MISCELLANEOUS

SMOKING ROOM STORIES

April 1 1911
MISCELLANEOUS

SMOKING ROOM STORIES

April 1 1911

SMOKING ROOM STORIES

That Nova Scotia, down by the sea, can boast of two R. L. Bordens was amply demonstrated during the federal campaign of 1908. A few days before the election of that year there reached Digby on a belated train from the interior of the province a commercial man bearing the same name as the leader of His Majesty’s opposition at Ottawa. He was bound for Montreal, and, owing to the delay, would not reach St. John until some time after the departure of the train for Montreal. lie was very anxious to reach that ity the following day. A happy thought struck him, and he sent the following telegram from Digby to the C.P.R. authbrities at St. John:—“Am delayed at Prince Rupert. Very anxious to reach Montreal in the morning. Is it possible to hold train?” Thinking the telegram came from the Conservative leader the train was held, much to the annoyance of the passengers. She pulled out of the Union depot fifty minutes late, and on her was R. L. Borden, but not R. L. Borden, the leader of His Majesty’s opposition at Ottawa.

Ex^f|kor Crosby, Halifax, now M.P., with R. Ii. Borden as his running mate, has a quiek wit, which he turned loose vpon Id.-Col. Hugh Clark, M.P.P. for

Centre Bruce, not long ago. It was in the Commons dining-room at Ottawa on St. Andrew’s night. The Prince Edward Island members gave an oyster supper that night. There was only one toast, but it was responded to by one man from each province. The Colonel, replying for Ontario, referred to the grace with which Scotchmen will make and take jokes levelled at themselves. “They are so sure of their position,” he said, “that they can stand for jokes at their own expense.” Replying for Nova Scotia, Mr. Crosby referred to these remarks, and said, amid laughter, in which none joined more heartily than Col. Clark himself, that “a joke is about the only thing a Scotchman will stand for at his own expense.”