RECORDS OF SUCCESS

Louise M. Carling—“Daughter of the Experimental Farm”

A Sketch of an Interesting Personality

Madge Macbeth July 1 1917
RECORDS OF SUCCESS

Louise M. Carling—“Daughter of the Experimental Farm”

A Sketch of an Interesting Personality

Madge Macbeth July 1 1917

Louise M. Carling—“Daughter of the Experimental Farm”

A Sketch of an Interesting Personality

Madge Macbeth

THEORISTS and statisticians and speculators cry “Back to the land!” They loose a flood of figures over us and try to prove the advantage of country over city life. They glibly speak of intensive farming and its lure—then they sign their lease for another year in town!

The fact is that women are afraid. To the city-bred the thought of a farm conjures up an unpleasant picture of Piers the Plowman, of a field sown with Giant’s Teeth, or of some gentle-lierceeyed-crumple-horhed cow at dawn and milking time, and they cling to theselfcontained kitchenette six flights from the street as pertinaciously as did our hairy forebears cling to the tallest sycamore trees. A woman who is doing much to eradicate this fear and to put other women on at least a partially familiar footing with bees, berries, melons and poultry, is Miss Louise M. Carling, of London, Ontario. She has been called by one of her friends “The daughter of the Experimental Farms.” Miss Carling is a daughter of the late Sir John Carling, “Father of the Experimental Farms.” In early childhood no shadow stretched its length toward agricultural ventures and gave a hint of the part she was to play in Canada’s farming future. By her own confession, she was a lazy youngster about gardening, and preferred to see others work rather than do any of it herself. She says. “I can’t think of anything unusual about my childhood. I probably cut my teeth in the ordinary manner, and passed through the variou% stages of infancy in an entirely unspectacular way.” This may be so. but it did not prevent Miss Carling’s personality from being felt even at an early date. Her ability, her enthusiasm toward the undertaking in hand, and her rare charm all tend to make her a splendid organizer. When Sir John and his family moved to the Capital after his appointment to the Cabinet, Miss Carling threw herself energetically into the life of Ottawa— social, artistic and philanthropic. She

was one of the organizers of the Morning Music Club to which she was elected honorary president foj life. The Club is flourishing to-day, after a record of many years’ successes, due in no small measure to Miss Louise Carling. Her tastes are catholic and her mind is broad. She encourages all forms of Art, including the dance. This breadth of view has met with disapproval—as upon an occasion when having been asked to arrange an entertainment for the church, Miss Carling varied a programme of singing, playing and recitations by a skirt dance! The horrified clergyman did not scruple to call her attention to the unsuitability of the attraction—but neither did he scruple to accept the funds Taised by the entertainment!

When Sir John began his life’s most interesting work—the establishment of the Farms—his daughter, too, gave a good deal of time and thought to the study of farming. She used to drive out

to the Ottawa Experimental Fàrm al most daily and watch the stumps being dynamited and the ground madè ready for sowing. Magically, it seemecl, onder her very eye, houses and barns I sprung up where woods and fields had been bot yesterday. In her words, “Ther grew like healthy children, as did thejshrubs and hedges in the Arboretum. | There were always hundreds of things and hold my attention, and I ways feel as though that fá: my very own. I look upon it the farms as a monument to father’s foresight in preparing

millions of people who will come fair Canada of ours. Indeed,

draw

all aiwere nd all dear r the this granas a ng to this

Car-

aries of the North-west are no' result of scientific methods, hel feed multitudes of foreigners dun: great war.”

Returning to London to live. Mi ling took up organization work!there. She started the Morning Musici Club and was elected its honorary président for life, as in - Ottawa. She was the founder of the Seventh Regiment {Chapter of the Daughters of the Empire; she was, and is. connected with so] many other clubs and societies that a list of them would make this sketch loolc like a catalogue. And because she {really worked for the organizations of {which she is a member, and she was a member of so many—her health became impaired and she was ordered to take a rest.

That destiny which shapes our|.ends, led her to a'-farm—not the fa the Gilded West, where fields of grain stretch away as far as can reach, but an intensive farm acre’s dimension, operated solely b| young girls.

They raised chickens. The “bi as they are called, had paid fo home in a few years and put eabh of the sisters through Macdonald College.

Miss Carling rested in a sense; at the same time her alert brain was^ceasplessly busy with schemes and plans whereby other women, grinding out colorlesaj lives in office or factory, might be assisted to

the healthfulness and the freedom and tile financially successful life of these two young women. She advanced a scheme by which the Government might offer certain small tracts of land to “homesteaders”—women; she made a pretty exhaustive study of small farming, both in theory and practice. She lectured and she wrote. She put herself personally in touch with women who were interested and collected an amazing amount of data. Of course one can find data anywhere. . . the magazines are

pretty well stuffed nowadays with “How I—” articles (500 words and photo—pay on acceptance). We are all familiar with them. . . . “How I made fifty

pounds of butter out of a spoonful of milk and a pinch of salt.” Or, “How I put my „three children through college on one bee.” Personally, I have never been inspired with a passion to follow any of these simple methods as a means of livelihood; journalism is so sure and lucrative, one could hardly ask for more —even of a bee. And I venture to say that many another women is no more convinced than am I, of the desirability of farming, after a reading of these delightful bits of literature. But Miss Carling convinces and helps. She has been the means of establishing several women on farms—and like a good fairy godmother, keeps in touch with her farming god-children.

Due largely to this practice of hers, combined with a certain definite influence which she possesses, the “Daughter of Experimental Farms” was elected President of the Women’s Gardening Association, of London. The object of this organization is to assist women in the most practical ways either tb start farming operations, or to give help to those already established on farms. They are given opportunities to hear good lectures, and the Association sells seeds as well as teaches the food value of vegetables.

This part of the work is especially interesting to the President who leans to vegetarianism, and who is a firm believer in the old Mosaic law which forbids us to partake of the flesh of an animal with a cloven hoof. She was speaking one day somewhat forcibly on the subject to an old man who happened to be particularly fond of pork.

He listened attentively for a while and then remarked, “Yes, I suppose pigs ain’t just what they used to be, before we caught and tamed ’em—before we put ’em in pens and fed ’em any old mess nothing else would eat. Seems to me they’ve dee-teriorated by associQtin’ with man—seems to me everything’s deeteriorated by associatin’ with man—even woman !”