REVIEW of REVIEWS

Germany Dreams of Revenge?

Dangerous Passions Are Being Stimulated in the Youth of Germany

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW September 15 1922
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Germany Dreams of Revenge?

Dangerous Passions Are Being Stimulated in the Youth of Germany

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW September 15 1922

Germany Dreams of Revenge?

Dangerous Passions Are Being Stimulated in the Youth of Germany

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW

AN ARTICLE from the pen of a writer who has just returned from a tour in Germany and who signs himself “An English Traveller” deals with the German attitude to France and England.

“There are two main currents of opinion in Germany at the present hour,” he says; “one held in financial and industrial circles mainly, is to the effect that a fresh war must at all costs be avoided; the other, held almost universally among all classes outside those limited circles throughout the country, has adopted and assimilated the view that a sudden and even partially successful campaign would relieve the embarrassments of the country, and further baffle the Allies, who have already been circumvented on so many occasions since 1919 by their obtuseness to the devious ways of Teutonic mentality. At the head of the first school are several great capitalists, of whom Stinnes is the most notorious, and they possessed an abie and plausible spokesman in the recently murdered Dr. Rathenau. They have also found a useful collaborator in President Ebert, whose popularity has grown with each proof of his pliancy. Such jetsam and flotsam easily disappear in heavy weather. At the head of the other body of opinion is Ludendorff and his group of Generals conning their maps, noting their resources, increasing the stores of poison gas, striving by every art of cajolery to terminate the occupation of the territory pledged for the fulfilment of German promises, so that they may carry their offensive, whenever the time for it arrives, outside German territory, and extending their intrigues east and west, so that a renewed struggle for Teutonic supremacy may again wear the aspect of a world war. This is the party that has the secret good wishes of all Germans, by whatever name they may call themselves in politics, many of whom are only waiting for an encouraging signal to break out in a passion of white heat, rage, rancour, vindictiveness and frightfulness to establish Pan-Teutonism over the few Allies who may then still hold together. The leaders are cool and calculating, but for hot-heads the dopes they are instilling into the youth of Germany may prove too potent for selfrestraint.

“I can absolutely aver that from no German of any position whatever could I obtain an admission that Germany was under any moral obligation to pay a single mark to the Allies. She might have to pay something of necessity, but the national resolve was to repudiate the responsibility at the very earliest moment.

“Berlin, as the chief objective of all visitors, commercial, curious or mere

passers-by, has, for the present, discarded its former military aspect to associate itself chiefly with business and pleasure. In Berlin the superficial side of the Germany of which President Ebert is the nominal head is the only one visible. No foreigner will get behind it, and, whatever secret measures may be concerting throughout Germany, no clue will be found to them in the capital. There are many reasons for this, but not the least important is apprehension of the Socialist Party, which is certainly not monarchical.

“We must go further east than Berlin to get at some idea of the truth. East Prussia and Upper Silesia contain the bases on which a movement corresponding to that of 1813 is being prepared. Under the designation of Arbeitgemeinschafter (the Workers’ Guilds) a vast organisation, composed of veterans of the Great War, has been created, and these men, trained in the severe Prussian system, have fallen quite naturally and without attracting notice, into the places assigned them by the directing intelligence. They have been formed into agricultural colonies distributed among the vast unoccupied estates and forests of the great landowners in East Prussia, Pomerania and Silesia. They form, by training and experience, a military caste which is to serve as the nucleus and rallying centre for a national movement ¿vhich is’ to be composed mainly of the youth of Germany. This military body, which is not concentrated but distributed in groups large enough to provide the cadre of a regiment, is by its nature reactionary, monarchical and vindictive. It requires no prompting or stimulant, and is ready to obey implicitly and at the first signal the orders it may receive from the authority it alone respects.

“Its efforts and proceedings have a distinct place and definite purpose in the programme of the German National and Monarchical Party, which is rapidly acquiring complete control of all the country’s resources, and arranging all its forces not only for the restoration of the monarchy and the violent suppression of the Republic, if its heads prove obstructive, but for a new war of revenge based on repudiation of the Treaty of Versailles.

“The only comment I shall venture to make in bringing these observations to a conclusion is that Germany, by teaching, organisation, and incitement, has created a dangerous position for the peace of Europe, and that the societies named in this paper have set themselves, by malice prepense, to the task of stimulating the worst passions in the humanbreastamong their fellow-countrymen, and especially in the youth of Germany.”