women and their work

TRAVEL LIGHT AND YOU TRAVEL IN COMLORT

For those who plan a long trip during this year’s vacation here are some suggestion as to how to keep the lug out of luggage.

RUTH SAYRE August 15 1926
women and their work

TRAVEL LIGHT AND YOU TRAVEL IN COMLORT

For those who plan a long trip during this year’s vacation here are some suggestion as to how to keep the lug out of luggage.

RUTH SAYRE August 15 1926

TRAVEL LIGHT AND YOU TRAVEL IN COMLORT

For those who plan a long trip during this year’s vacation here are some suggestion as to how to keep the lug out of luggage.

RUTH SAYRE

women and their work

ARE you going to London to see the Queen? Going to Paris to revel in . the shops and boulevards? Going by coach-and-four and Loch steamer through the wonder of the Trossachs?

You are? Lucky person! Then don’t mar the wonder of such a holiday with the worry and strain of too much luggage. Don’t, in fact take anything you can do without, nor anything you have a sort of a feeling you could do without.

What Is Essential?

A SSUMING that you are going for a sightseeing tour, and not in search of social triumph, I would suggest that, first of all, you possess yourself of a goodlooking top coat, a small tailored hat which harmonizes with it, and a traveling frock of balbriggan, or a knitted dress; something not too pale in shade, and of an uncrushable nature. Serge, flannel, silk or satin are easily wrinkled, and resting in a deck chair is not calculated to keep the creases out of such fabrics. Then, too, the woollen materials will be cosy on board ship, and will be more happily worn without a top-coat later, than would the less durable silk fabrics.

You will want a second hat, one that will fold or pack flat in your case and which you will only wear on board ship. Woollen hose, or silk and wool, and walking shoes with rubber heels complete the outer travelling ensemble. There are, of course, many who will say: “Why not a suit?” The reason is, that you would have to have a top coat in any event, and this would necessitate the packing of either the suit coat or the top coat and adding considerable bulk to your luggage. Last year when I went over I wore a very sensible traveling suit, and of course, took a top coat, and the result was that, everywhere I went, I was either carrying the top coat over my arm or the suit coat in my case, and I resolved that next time I would take only the always-useful top coat, L_j

What of Lingerie?

NOW with the outer apparel taken care of, it is time to think of the lingerie, accessories and toiletries. Lastly, because they will go on the top of your cases, the fragile like dinner and dance frock.

For wear on board ship you will want wool or silk and wool underwear. If money is not the dictator glove or knitted silk is the choice for general wear, not only because it clings clogely to the form and so gives the best line, but because it requires no ironing —and laundering is a problem when you are traveling —and also for the reason that it is not weighty to carry and is easily packed.

Many women who wear dark traveling ensembles, prefer black or navy vest and knickers of glove silk, but, constantly worn, there is the chance that the black will rub a bit and then milady’s corselette will not have as fresh and dainty an appearance as she might, quite naturally, desire.

Three sets of undergarments ought to be ample. You won’t ever be far from shops into which you will delight to go, should emergency prove your supply insufficient. One dark silk slip, and two light ones unless you wisely choose a dark evening dress, in which case, both formal and traveling dress being dark you will want the majority of your slips to be darker toned.

For wear on the train and ship, pyjamas of black crepe de chine or glove silk are ideal, but lighter shades are suitable for hotel wear, and three sets are quite enough to carry. It is essential for every woman traveler to have a dressing gown of some opaque material to wear in passing from her room to the bathrooms of hotels and ships, for it must be remembered that there are very few hotels in the old land which provide “room with bath” as we do here in Canada, and in the United States.

I saw negligees of georgette and lace, crepe de chine and ostrich feathers in my corridor wanderings last year, and they smacked more of a kitchen, bedroom and bath musical comedy, than the equipment of sensible, travel-wise tourists. Silk undergarments are not by any means the only light-weight or sensible ones. They are first choice, but voile, fine nainsook, silk broadcloth or dimity can be substituted, for the sake of a more slender purse. These garments, of course, look better foi the imprint of a hot iron after contact with the wash bowl, but there are tricks in all trades, and for voile, at least, there is a means of escape from the iron. Most hotel rooms have either closets or wardrobes containing full length mirrors, and there is nothing better to “iron” voile or fine linen than a glass surface. If you haven’t time to send your undies to the laundry, wash them in your room—every hotel I was in had running hot and cold water in the room—squeeze the water out of them, and then spread them smoothly on the mirror surface. It may be necessary to secure them at the top with a pin stuck very carefully into the edge of the frame-work, but you will be amazed at the dainty smoothness with which the garments will dry. Straight vests and step-ins actually require no other treatment, but knickers are more of a problem, although pyjamas and nightrobes react splendidly to the mirror treatment. Crinkly cotton crepe requires no ironing or pressing.

It rests, of course, with the individual

Handkerchiefs may be subjected to the same process, and soft collars respond to it beautifully, too. as to what supply of hose is taken, but silk hose can be bought as satisfactorily here as on the other side, both as regards price and quality. As for shoes, she is awise woman who carries only her traveling shoes and one pair of dress shoes and dancing shoes with her. In fact if the last two can be made to synchronize she is luckier still. Every one wants to bring home British brogues and Paris pumps, and should the customs officer begin to tumble out five or six rights before a left appears, he is apt to put his chalk back in his pocket and ask leading questions.

Packing and Placing

SO THERE you are, nearly ready to go.

In the bottom of the single suit-case are your two pairs of frivolous shoes, and between them the several pairs of new silk hose. In the bottom also are those “extras” which we carry for emergency sake . . . the third set of undies, the third slip and night-robe, and a fine, wool hug-me-tight to snuggle into should the deck be very cold. Then come the rest of the undies, the kimona, the pile of handkerchiefs and the crush hat for deck wear. Our dresses are ready to go in, the tailleur, which will have to be very carefully folded and pinned to its cardboard, slab to keep it from crushing too badly,, and the dinner and dance frock which being only a bit of fluff anyway, will go iifc last and be taken out first.

Before we pack them, however, there are the toiletries to think of, and herd again it is a sign of wisdom to carry a small stock. For a very small sum you can purchase a rubberized chintz apron which contains a multitude of pockets, and eyen though you expect to have a good-sized state-room you won’t find this manner of carrying and keeping together your toilet requisites an easy one to eclipse. Brush, comb, mirror, tooth-brush holder, nail file and scissors, talcum tin, cream, tooth paste, face powder—these all have their compartment, and it is the simplest thing in the world to tie this apron about your waist and have done with stooping and pawing and disarranging your case to find what you wish. By the way, it is a very good plan to have your face powder put into a screw top container. It saves spilling and is so much easier to handle. An ordinary cork fitted over the points of your scissors is another worth-while damage preventive, if you haven’t a scissors case. Save one pocket for a roll of bandaging gauze, the sterile kind, and a narrow roll f aodjesive tape for first aid.

One of those thimble and needle cases could be slipped into a small box with a couple of yards of black and white and whatever colors of silk thread you need, wound on bobbins or twists of stiff paper. A bodkin, several buttons and a couple of hooks and eyes or dome fasteners also go in this emergency box, and then the apron is folded over, a bathing cap placed on top of it—this to keep the marcel in your hair when you are luxuriating in the hot bath which takes the ache out of your tired limbs—your tailleur and dance frock are laid on top, two wire hangers secured in the canvas flap, and when you have put your boudoir cap in one pocket, your curling tongs in another and your thick note-book for keeping the diary you will always cherish in the last, you heave a sigh of relief and snap the lock on a good piece of work.

Umbrella, waterproof, rubbers, you ask? Wait until you need them. Last summer was another of those trick seasons in England, and while there were two or three days when I could have used the above mentioned articles I actually didn’t even buy an umbrella until the day I was leaving London for Scotland, and then the main reason I bought it was because I saw a purple silk one at so reasonable a price that I couldn’t resist it.

Another word to the wise. Don’t weight your bag with electric curling irons, for your attachment won’t fit, unless you wish to have it changed over there. *

Make out the list of what you think you ought to have, then prune it, and after you’ve done that prune it again, for the secret of getting the last ounce of j oy out of travelling is solved by the text:

“Travel light.”