Women and their Work

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON September 15 1927
Women and their Work

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON September 15 1927

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON

NOTE : When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must 3ign their names, faUh°r puk^cat*on’ but as a guarantee cf good Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

Question—I.L.: I am interested in

dress-making, but am in a place where it is impossible to learn it except by a correspondence course. Do you know of a reliable and not too expensive course?

Answer—I can recommend an excellent, simple one, the address of which I have sent you.

Question—G.S.: Will you kindly tell me how long it takes to become a dietitian?

Answer—You can take the four year course at Macdonald College, McGill University, or at the School of Household Science, University of Toronto. An excellent two year course is given in Macdonald Institute, Ontario College of Agriculture, Guelph.

Question—E.D.: Can you tell me how to build a sun dial? Or can one buy them already built?

Answer—In a King Street shop here I saw recently some delightful garden accessories—bird baths, fountains and sun dials. The latter cost $70 for the tall design, and less for the shorter ones. The only directions I can find for making sun dials are contained in a magazine dated February 1917. This is in the reference library here, but you could have the article copied for about two dollars.

Question—Mrs. V. B.W.I. In the last MacLean’s to reach me, someone asks how to get on the teachers’ exchange in order that she may teach in the West Indies. If she will apply directly to Mr. Arthur Lynborg, St. Thomas, Virgin Island, she will get quick results, especially if she has domestic science. Mr. Lynborg told me recently he would be glad to place a Canadian friend of mine who, however, is unable to come. St. Thomas and St. Croix are the only West Indian islands employing white teachers except in a very few of the largest church schools. The schools in the British West Indian islands offer very low salaries. Principals receive eighty pounds a year and assistants from ten shillings to three pounds per month. I am living on a British island, twenty-five miles from St. Thomas.

Another correspondent asks for directions for French polishing of furniture. I have picked up a lot of fine old mahogany down here and French polished it myself with good results, and as it is very simple, I shall pass it on.

After removing all varnish, etc., with Takoff, I sandpaper and scrape with glass. Next I make a pad of cheesecloth, dip lightly in orange shellac (strained) and quickly and lightly rub a small piece —say half of a table top, then leave that till you do the second half. Now dip your pad, just touching the surface, in boiled oil, and quickly go over the slightly tacky first half, then rub fast and furiously for about five minutes, then go on to the next piece. Do one leg at a time, so as not to let the shellac dry. Leave it for several days, lightly sandpaper and repeat the process. I find four coats about right. Only a very little oil should be used, merely touch the pad to the oil.

Answer—Thank you very much for these helpful pieces of information. I know everyone will enjoy your letter. The directions for French polishing are well worth filing for future reference.