Highest Trees Are In America

Stories of Astounding Trees on Other Continents Prove False When Investigated.

NEW YORK TIMES November 15 1930

Highest Trees Are In America

Stories of Astounding Trees on Other Continents Prove False When Investigated.

NEW YORK TIMES November 15 1930

Highest Trees Are In America

Stories of Astounding Trees on Other Continents Prove False When Investigated.

NEW YORK TIMES

STORIES of prodigiously high trees growing in foreign lands have often been told, but upon investigation none of them have proved to be so high as trees which now stand in North America. In pointing out that the highest of all the known high trees is in California, The New York Times states:

“A few tree species are noted for the great heights attained by them, but as a general rule heights tend to increase in proportion to the distance of the trees from possible sources of verification. Thus, stories are told of gum, ash and oak trees in remote sections of Australia and Tasmania reaching and exceeding 500 feet. An American forester who lately visited Australia investigated some of these tales. Three hundred and ten feet was the height of the tallest tree he measured, and he found that the tallest tree of which there were authentic records on that continent was a swamp gum, belonging to the Eucalyptus genus, 346 feet high.

“The eucalyptus of Tasmania and Australia do, however, commonly reach the enormous height of 250 feet with a diameter of 14 feet, requiring 400 years and more to arrive at these dimensions. Yet compared with some native trees of North America these foreign species must take second place.

“The Douglas fir of the Pacific slope occasionally grows more than 300 feet high, and the United States Forest Service is reported to have records of trees 350 feet. The tallest tree in the world of which there are authentic measurements is a giant redwood growing in Bull Creek Flat, California. Its height is 363 feet. The big trees also attain great heights, but not as great as tourists, estimating with the unaided eye, and guidebook figures would have one believe.

I Probably the greatest authentically known height of a big tree is 365 feet, measured after the tree had fallen.

“The largest and most magnificent true pine in the world is the sugar pine. David Douglas, the first botanist to describe the species, reported asugar pine in Southern Oregon 245 feet high. None of equal size has been reported since, but stems 200 feet tall have been found.

“The East produces one champion among the trees, the yellow' poplar, or tulip tree, the tallest hardwood tree native to this country. Yellow poplars approaching the 200-foot mark have been found. The sycamore, another native to the East, does not grow as tall as the yellow poplar, but it attains the largest diameter of any hardwood of the United States.”