Woman and the Home

Christmas Menus

A few timely suggestions on the art of arranging breakfast and supper menus that will supplement, and not overshadow the Christmas dinner

HELEN G. CAMPBELL December 15 1930
Woman and the Home

Christmas Menus

A few timely suggestions on the art of arranging breakfast and supper menus that will supplement, and not overshadow the Christmas dinner

HELEN G. CAMPBELL December 15 1930

Christmas Menus

Woman and the Home

A few timely suggestions on the art of arranging breakfast and supper menus that will supplement, and not overshadow the Christmas dinner

HELEN G. CAMPBELL

Director of The Chatelaine Institute

THE night before Christmas may be a time of hushed expectancy, but the joyous music of children’s laughter and the patter of little feet greets the dawn of the happy morning. Long before the usual waking hour, bulging stockings are turned out and the mysteries of gay packages explored. When at last each box is opened, and the house is strewn with wrappings, bits of ribbon and greeting cards, the call to breakfast is a welcome sound. Rosycheeked, bright-eyed children, and the more sedate but happy grown-ups realize all at once that appetites are keen. The first meal of this merry day is a jolly informal one. There are no limitations of time or menu. Though, if dinner is to be served at mid-day, it will not do to eat too heartily now. Choose instead a simple menu; some fruit, a little cereal, perhaps a hot bread and jam. Or you may prefer to forego the cereal and have instead a light, foamy omelet, or a slice or two of crisp bacon with jelly or marmalade. Perhaps a waffle iron is among your Christmas gifts. If so, it will be a gala meal indeed if you use it to make the waffles suggested in the recipe given below. There will be coffee, of course, well made, fresh and steaming hot.

The Evening Supper

TF DINNER is at seven, breakfast may be a more A substantial meal with a light lunch in the early afternoon. Usually the Christmas dinner is served at one or two o’clock, and it is so abounding in good things that supper is likely to be a light affair.

Nevertheless, it requires some thought and planning to make supper happy ending to the holiday. Do not make it elaborate, but choose simple dishes which are appetizing and easily prepared. A friendly fireside meal will bring your guests together in pleasant conversation and mirthful informality, and will make but small demand upon the hostess. Sandwiches, cake, and hot coffee are ample and appropriate and are likely to be more enjoyed than heavier fare.

Or try serving your supper in buffet style. The guests will help themselves and take from your shoulders much of the effort of serving. Moreover, you will be quite in the fashion, for buffet service has caught the fancy of smart hostesses. To do this successfully, get out your prettiest cloth, arrange a low centrepiece of flowers or fruit, and group knives, forks and other necessary dishes in as attractive and as convenient a manner as possible.

Just before the meal, place the food upon the table. If you have decided upon a dessert, such as ice cream, or another dish such as will deteriorate in appearance and flavor by standing in a warm room, it is wise to bring in only those foods to be served in the first course. With a simple menu, it is often convenient to arrange all the dishes at once, though those required for the first course should be removed after they are used. The maid or the daughter of the house, or indeed, one of the guests may collect the soiled dishes, while the hostess pours tea or coffee at the service table, and places the cups where the guests may easily reach them and help themselves to cream and sugar. Sometimes, the teapot or coffee urn and cups and saucers are placed at one end of the table for the guests to pour their own beverage.

Arranging the Table

TN THE arrangement of the table, the hostess has scope for her artistic bent. With gleaming silver and colorful china, she may make a charming setting for delicious food. Convenience, is, of course, a point to keep in mind; plates, serviettes, forks, spoons, and knives, should be set out in a way which will avoid confusion and unnecessary searching for the required articles. See that the food is placed in more or less logical fashion. First, the serving dishes, then the main dish with its accompaniments close at hand. Dessert, if it appears on the table at this time, may be at another end of the table, or grouped with the dishes for this course, at one side.

It is best to provide card tables, or make some arrangement which will not necessitate the endeavor to manipulate too many things at once. What wonder that dresses are ruined when one tries to eat cold meat and salad, or other food which requires both knife and fork, from a plate held in one’s lap.

Many hostesses have served their first buffet meal with misgivings, but are soon convinced of its advantages. Who could be too staid and dignified in the jolly informal atmosphere which is invariably created? And what a saving to the hostess in time and effort!

Breakfast Menus for Christmas Morning

Baked red apple Shredded wheat biscuit Fig muffins Honey Coffee or cocoa Fruit Juice Rolled oats with cream Hot biscuits Jam Cocoa Half grapefruit Parsley omelet Toast Conserve Coffee or cocoa Buffet Supper Menus for Christmas Night Jellied veal Potato cakes Hot roll ; Sweet pickles Pear and jelly salad Christmas cake Tea or coffee Cold sliced ham or turkey Potato salad Brown bread and lettuce sandwiches Maple bisque Cookies

Tea or coffee Devilled egg salad Toasted cheese sandwiches Peppermint stick ice-cream Tea or coffee Japanese eggs Cabbage and green pepper salad Rolled sandwiches Assorted relishes Cranberry tartlets Christmas cake Tea or coffee RECIPES Waffles 2 Eggs 11 $ Cupfuls of milk 1 Tablespoonful of sugar 3 ¿ Teaspoonful of salt 2 Cupfuls of flour 4 Teaspoonfuls of baking powder 3 Tablespoonfuls of melted butter

Beat the eggs thoroughly and add the milk. Mix and sift the dry ingredients together, and add to the first mixture. Beat well until there are no lumps, add the melted butter, and pour the batter into the centre of the hot waffle iron. Serve hot with honey or maple syrup. This recipe makes four large waffles.

Fig Muffins 1 Cupful of bran llA Cupfuls of flour 2% Teaspoonfuls of baking powder y2 Teaspoonful of salt 1 Egg 1 Cupful of milk 1 Tablespoonful of melted butter y2 Cupful of chopped figs

Mix and sift the flour, baking powder and salt, and add to the bran. Add the milk to the beaten egg, and combine with the dry ingredients. Add the melted butter, and stir just enough to blend the ingredients. Pour into well greased muffin tins and bake for twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven (375 degrees). Maple B squet 1 Cupful of maple syrup 2 Egg yolks iy> Tablespoonfuls of gelatine 3 Tablespoonfuls of cold water 1 Pint of whipping cream Y Cupful of chopped walnuts Beat the egg yolks into the maple syrup and heat sufficiently to cook the eggs but do not boil. Pour this hot mixture on to the gelatine which has been soaked in the cold water. When it begins to set, fold in the whipped cream and add the chopped nuts. Turn into a cold mold and allow to se.. Rolled Sandwiches With a very sharp knife cut thin slices from a loaf of fresh bread. Remove the crusts and spread with creamed butter. Roll some of the slices around a stalk of asparagus, some around small stalks of stuffed celery, and others around sprigs of fresh water cress or parsley. Jellied Veal Loaf 1 Knuckle of veal 1 Pound of lean veal

1 Medium onion Boiling water to cover Have the veal knuckle wiped and cut in pieces. Put into a kettle with the lean veal and the sliced onion. Cover with the boiling water and cook slowly until the veal is tender. Drain, and save the liquid in which the meat was cooked. Chop the meat finely and season well with salt and pepper. Line the bottom of a mold with slices of hard-cooked eggs, sprinkle with chopped parsley, and cover with a layer of the chopped meat. Then cover with another layer of the hard-cooked eggs, sprinkle with parsley and add the remainder of the meat. Over the contents of the mold pour the liquid which has been reduced to one cupful by boiling it down. Cover, press and chill, and serve turned out on to a platter and garnished with parsley.

Peppermint Ice Cream l/2 Pound of peppermint stick candy 1 Cupful of milk 2 Cupfuls of whipped cream Dissolve the candy in the milk in a double boiler. Chill, and when very cold add the cream, which has been stiffly whipped. Freeze in the tray of a mechanical refrigerator or in a freezer. If a freezer is used turn the handle very slowly and only enough to ensure freezing evenly, This makes ten medium servings. Japanese Eggs 3 Hard.cooked eggs y2 Cupful of rice 1 Cupful of medium white sauce 1 Teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley Cut the eggs in half lengthwise, remove the yolks, mash and add one teaspoonful of butter, a little salt and pepper and enough warm milk to moisten. Refill the whites with this mixture and keep hot for serving. Cook the rice, drain it and dry it. Spread about one and one-half inches thick in a hot casserole, press the prepared eggs into the rice and cover with the white sauce. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and serve.