WOMEN and their WORK

Cakes That Keep

Cakes that retain their freshness are among the necessities of the well-stored larder

MARGOT MACDONALD February 1 1930
WOMEN and their WORK

Cakes That Keep

Cakes that retain their freshness are among the necessities of the well-stored larder

MARGOT MACDONALD February 1 1930

Cakes That Keep

WOMEN and their WORK

Cakes that retain their freshness are among the necessities of the well-stored larder

MARGOT MACDONALD

THE kind of cake which may be packed away and forgotten, or at least overlooked for a few weeks in the knowledge that it is constantly improving, is naturally the first cake we think of when we want one which can be stored indefinitely and called upon when needed. Usually a rich fruit cake, it is frequently made only once or twice in a season; several loaves are achieved with little more bother than a single cake.

There are other rich mixtures which, without the longevity of the heavy fruit cake, may still be counted upon over a considerable period of time. There are also less elaborate fruited mixtures which will stand by for a week or two.

Scotch shortbread, rich cookies, spiced and fruited and nearly as rich as the shortbread, offer quite a different type of dependable cakes. Some of each of these groups are included in the accompanying recipes.

A Practical Fruit Cake

1 Cupful of butter

1 Cupful of molasses

5 Eggs

1 Teaspoonful each of cloves, allspice, ginger, cinnamon

34 Pound of candied citron

Additional flour

34 Cupful of sugar

134 Cupfuls of milk

2 Cupfuls of flour

1 Pound of seeded raisins

1 Pound of currants

34 Pound of candied peel

1 Pound of dates

1 Teaspoonful of soda

2 Tablespoonfuls of hot water

Cream butter thoroughly and gradually work in sugar; add the warmed molasses. Separate the eggs and add the well-beaten yolks, then sift in gradually the two cupfuls of flour wit which all the spices have been mixed and sifted several times. Add the milk gradually and the fruit which has been carefully cleaned, the currants well dried after being washed, and lightly coated with flour. Add sufficient additional flour so that the mixing spoon will stand upright when thrust into the dough. Dissolve the soda in hot water and mix in very thoroughly. Turn into a pan lined with greased paper and bake in a slow oven.

Rich Cherry Fruit Cake

1 Pound of washed and dried currants

34 Pound of citron

2 Cupfuls of flour

1 Pound of glacé cherries

34 Pound of mixed candied peel

2 Teaspoonfuls of cinnamon

1 Teaspoonful of allspice

1 Cupful of fine sugar

1 Pound of seeded raisins

34 Teaspoonful of salt

1 2 Teaspoonful of nutmeg

34 Teaspoonful of mace

Í CupfuT of butter

6 Eggs

34 Cupful of lemon juice

34 Cupful of orange juice

Red and green cherries make this cake very colorful and attractive. Cut most of them in half; tear the raisins apart. Wash currants and dry them thoroughly— this takes time. Shave citron and mixed candied peel as thinly as possible. Mix flour, salt and spices well and sift them several times; dredge some of the mixture over the well-mixed fruits, coating them all lightly.

Cream the butter; work in sugar gradually; add the well-beaten egg yolks. Add alternately the remaining flour mixture and fruit juices, then the well-floured fruit and finally fold in the stiffly-beaten egg whites.

Have cake pan greased and lined with heavy white paper, buttered. Put in a layer of the cake mixture about an inch thick and over this spread the thinlyshaved peel and a few additional whole cherries if available; put in another layer of cake mixture and repeat. Over the top layer of dough, arrange blanched almonds or nuts, cherries, citron and strips of angelica in any decorative pattern. Bake in a very slow oven, 250 deg. Fahr., about four and a half hours, if you have a thoroughly dependable oven which you can regulate with confidence. Otherwise, it is safer to steam the cake for three hours, then finish by baking three-quarters of an hour in a moderate oven, 350 deg. Fahr.

When the cake is finished, let it stand for five minutes before removing from the pan. Let it cool on a wire cake rack, and when cold wrap closely in wax paper and put away in a metal box with a close-fitting cover to ripen.

Apple Sauce Cake

In contrast to the rich and rather expensive fruit cake, the apple sauce cake offers a mixture so delicious that it may surprise you; and it will keep quite nicely for at least a couple of weeks.

2 Cupfuls of flour

1 Teaspoonful of soda

134 Teaspoonfuls of cinnamon

1 Cupful of seeded raisins

134 Cupfuls of apple sauce

34 Teaspoonful of baking powder

1 Cupful of white sugar

1 Cupful of chopped dates

3á Cupful of walnuts (optional)

334 Cupful of melted butter

34 Teaspoonful of salt

34 Teaspoonful of nutmeg

34 Teaspoonful of ground cloves

Mix dry ingredients well together and sift them; prepare the, fruits—stone and chop dates, tear raisins, break or chop nutmeats if used. Sift some of the flour mixture over the well-mixed fruit and ñutís, to coat them evenly; then add all the rest of the dry mixture, and when thoroughly combined, add the apple sauce into which the melted butter has been poured. Beat vigorously for two minutes, then turn into a greased loaf-pan lined with greased white paper and bake in a moderate oven, 350 deg. Fahr., fifty to sixty minutes, or until the cake shrinks from the sides of the pan.

Keep-well Drop Cakes

1 Cupful of butter

3 Eggs

1 Cupful of chopped dates

2 34 Cupfuls of flour

1 Teaspoonful of cinnamon

1 Teaspoonful of soda

134 Cupfuls of granulated sugar

1J4 Cupfuls of walnut meats Pinch of salt

12 Teaspoonful of mace

34 Teaspoonful of allspice

1 Tablespoonful of hot water

Work the sugar well into the butter with your mixing spoon, then finish blending them by squeezing and working with the hands. Break in one egg at a time, mixing it well into the butter and sugar.

Mix the chopped dates and broken nutmeats and dredge lightly with part of the flour; add them to the mixture.

Sift the salt and spices with the flour and work it into the mixture a little at a time. Dissolve the soda in the hot water and mix it in very thoroughly. Drop from a teaspoon on buttered and floured tins and bake in a moderate oven. Although soft when taken from the oven, the surface will become dry as the cakes cool. When cold, pack them away—they should stand least two or three days and will keep two or three weeks.

Almond and Cherry Short^rsai

1 Cupful of butter

3 Cupfuls of flour

1 Cupful of glacé cherries, red and green

% Cupful of brown sugar

34 Cupful of blanched almonds

Cream the butter thoroughly and gradually work in the sugar and the sifted flour; the mixture will become very thick and the flour will have to be practically kneaded in toward the end. Add the blanched nuts and the cherries, and press into a loaf pan so that the end surface will be about two inches square. Chill very thoroughly, then remove from pan; cut in slices and bake in a moderate oven, 375 deg. Fahr.

Spice Cake

This is another member of the simpler group of cakes, but it will keep quite nicely for about a week.

1 % Cupfuls of flour

y Teaspoonful of salt

% Teaspoonful of soda

1 Teaspoonful of cinnamon

y2 Teaspoonful of cloves

y Teaspoonful of mace

Teaspoonful of nutmeg

Y% Cupful of brown sugar

1 Cupful of seeded raisins or dates

1 Cupful of walnut meats

y Cupful of butter

1 Cupful of sour milk

Mix all the dry ingredients well and sift them two or three times. Add the torn raisins or chopped dates and the broken nutmeats. Melt the butter, combine it with the well-soured milk—or buttermilk may be used—and add gradually to the mixture of dry ingredients and fruit. Stir vigorously for a minute or two to blend well, then turn into a greased pan lined with greased paper and bake in a slow oven, 325 deg. Fahr., for about an hour.

If desired, instead of baking this mixture in a loaf-pan, it may be baked in one deep layer and covered with a boiled frosting and chopped walnuts.