Review of Reviews

France Distrusts Mass Production

Guards Against it as One of the Main Causes of Unemployment

January 15 1934
Review of Reviews

France Distrusts Mass Production

Guards Against it as One of the Main Causes of Unemployment

January 15 1934

France Distrusts Mass Production

Guards Against it as One of the Main Causes of Unemployment

OTHER NATIONS may well leam a lesson from France, where unemployment is low, and where the government keeps an unceasing watch against mass production, writes S. Harcourt-Rivington in The National Review:

In France the interests of the State are paramount. Individual freedom is a limited thing. Personal gain must always give way to the needs of the community at large. One of the abiding ideals of government policy is to maintain all her people in full and profitable employment. Consider unemployment statistics as they exist today. Of the total working population, the percentage unemployed in Britain, the United States and Germany is respectively 13.4, 26.1 and 11.2. In France it is w'ell under two per cent.

To the end of full employment for all her people every part of France’s policy is thought out. Nothing is left to chance. All aspects of the trend of affairs are considered and steps taken to prevent circumstances arising that will defeat that ideal. In this connection, France has been acutely concerned about mass production, and from the first, viewed it with suspicion. For, as France sees it, mass production can become one of the chief causes of unem ployment.

The development in France of its principles—whether applied to the soil or factoryhas been watched with unceasing vigilance. When M. Deladier. at the Work! Economic Conference, stressed the overcoming of the evil of unrestrained mass production and rationalization, he knew that the failure to grip this economic evil in our own and other countries is primarily responsible for most of the world's employment troubles.

He wras putting his finger on the industrial world’s weak point. He was pointing out that the negligent disregard of the inexorable law of supply and demand had extracted its logical penalty; that unrestrained mass production had created foodstuffs and manufactured goods beyond the requirements even of modem civilization; and lowered price-level which all now agree is one of the chief obstacles to the return of prosperity.