REVIEW of REVIEWS

Wives Wanted

In the Arctic, Hundreds of Bachelors Would Marry If They Could Only Get Girls

July 15 1935
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Wives Wanted

In the Arctic, Hundreds of Bachelors Would Marry If They Could Only Get Girls

July 15 1935

Wives Wanted

In the Arctic, Hundreds of Bachelors Would Marry If They Could Only Get Girls

SOME observations made by Robert Cromie, publisher of the Vancouver Sun, when he took a vacation trip to the

Arctic, are reprinted herewith:

The hospital work the Catholics and Anglicans are doing in there is commendable. But I cannot see where you can improve the Indian’s environment beyond trapping, and too much schooling and education and soft living will unfit him for that, and spoil him for anything else.

At Fort McMurrav you see the tar sands where they get natural asphalt, and you see the salt mines. They are closed down, they say around the village, because the Waterways railroad, owned by the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railways, would not give them reasonable freight rates and accommodation . . . “because they did not want a mine in the West to supply Western Canada and the Coast market and thus do away with the long haul from the salt mine at Windsor.”

“Caribou meat,” said a resident, “is a complete diet in itself. Because of what the caribou eats, lichens and moss, its llesh is like eating vegetables.”

Our 750-ton cargo of supplies and machinery is worth about $-100,000: the freight on it alone will be close to $75,000; five cents a pound, or $100 a ton on 750 tons equals $75,000. But the cost to the Hudson’s Bay Company, who operate these steamers, is terrific.

The Eskimo is a fine, big. upright, robust fellow, walks up to you, shakes your hand and looks you right in the eye.

The Indian slinks around, looks at the ground, mumbles and has not the personality or get-up of the Eskimo.

The mother pool at 1,100 feet at Fort Norman shows there are unlimited quantities of crude oil there. But here you are limited in production to the little oil and gas you can sell in that country.

The same is true of a copper mine. They have huge mountains of native copper at Coppermine, near Bear Lake, but there are only six weeks when you can ship it out.

Most people in the Arctic have radios. One Flskimo schooner I visited had a radio.

Reception is poor in summer, but excellent in winter.

Sitting down in Arctic homes, listening in, being part of the world but not in it, these people of the North are able to see and get their minds around trends and events much clearer than those of us who live in cities. They see the world and see things in perspective; it is too close to us who are in and part of it.

In that North country there are easily 500 available young bachelors—trapjxtrs, traders, miners, wireless operators—who need wives; they are sticking needles into their fingers, doing their own cooking, living in untidy houses, wishing they knew where and how to go about landing a wife.

The records show that most single girls who go to the North country are soon snatched up and married.