Mailbag

Mailbag

What We Like About Birthdays

November 26 1955
Mailbag

Mailbag

What We Like About Birthdays

November 26 1955

Mailbag

What We Like About Birthdays

Congratulations on the special anniversary issue (Oct. 15). I have been reading the magazine for several years, but this issue was one of the best. The article by Hugh MacLennan (What Kind of People We’ll Become) was especially good. A lot has been said in this article that thousands across Canada are thinking but have not had the courage to do anything about. —Harley E. Bye, Montreal.

• The anniversary number is an outstanding achievement in journalism. I have come across nothing that conveys so effectively our emerging nationhood. The Leacock sampling was of special personal interest. That your magazine should continue to progress is important to the northern half of this continent.—Gladstone Murray, Toronto.

• Congratulations on The Best of Maclean’s over 50 years. The "best” short story—the short story I enjoyed most-—was published some years a\o, titled, Woman, You Put No Salt In The Porridge!—Mrs. Lome Bower, Stoughton, Sask.

• I remember when you had a monthly called the Busy Man’s Magazine, then changed to Maclean’s. I have several bound volumes of those issues. 1 have been a subscriber for fully forty years. After I have read the whole magazine I lend it to several of my friends, then mail it to a pal in Bradford, England. So you see I am proud of my Maclean’s. — C. E. Smith, Windsor, N.S.

• My wife and I have celebrated our golden wedding, Saskatchewan and Alberta their golden jubilee and now Maclean’s has arrived at its fiftieth milestone of brilliant achievement. The make-up and contents of your special issue make my heart swell with pi ide for Canada. Your editorial independence makes me still more proud.—J. T. Dawson, San Diego, Calif.

• Of special interest to me was A Nostalgic Album of Old-Time Magazine Art. But Hugh MacLennan’s article, What Kind of People We’ll Become, was tops.—C. Nickel, Waterloo, Ont.

• S. Leacock’s On Modern Business never fails to intrigue me . . . And a word of praise to Hugh MacLennan. He is one of our finest Canadian writers. The whole of the magazine was teeming in interest.—Geo. Robertshaw, K il -worthy, Ont.

• During your fifty years of growth 1 have never missed an issue for thirtysix years. During all those years every copy has been a good buy. Above all it is Canadian, and you must have made many friends in other countries. I happen to be a public-school principal . . . Most of Maclean’s editions find a spot in my classroom, after I’ve read them, and the children enjoy them until the pages are dog-eared. And many of your articles have formed a background for social studies; some have been used

for talks to young people. Keep up the good work.—R. L. Hyslop, Stoney Creek, Ont.

• To rhymer P. J. Blackwell, as one Halfway Marker to another:

Brave folks, we hide beneath a smile, Wounds made by kids wide-eyed with guile

Who wonder how we still can say We’re youthful.

There’s comfort in the thought that soon As “lean and slippered pantaloon,” We’ll need no argument to prove We’re truthful!

— Margery De La Mare, Victoria, B.C.

• I cannot wait to congratulate each member of your staff for this splendid

issue.—Mrs. E. H. Sanderson, Toronto.

• Congratulations ... it should be required reading for all native-born and new Canadians, both young and old.

My sincere thanks for the generous reference to my father, Senator George

T. Fulford, who was killed in a motor car accident at the height of his career just when Maclean’s Magazine was starting its long and useful life. But please correct the impression that father lived in Toronto. His greatest boast was that Brock ville was his home.—George T. Fulford, Brockville, Ont,

• . . . We have enjoyed the magazine since 1935. Your editorials have always seemed fair and straight from the shoulder, although occasionally cutting painfully close to my chauvinistic quick. Your articles have always been slightly terrific . . .—Fred M. Wren.

• ... 1 want to tell you about two old issues of Maclean’s I resurrected from the attic of the old farmhouse where I was born near Wingham, Ont. The magazines are dated March and May of 1913 ... In each issue there is a section entitled The Best Selling Book Of The Month. In March Corporal Cameron came first, followed by Rhymes Of A Rolling Stone. Sunshine Sketches Of A Little Town was sixth. There is a fine portrait of a young lad called Robert W. Service ... In May the best seller in Canada was Jeffery Farnol’s Amateur Gentleman, and it was second in the

U. S. where The Heart Of The Hills was first and fourth place was held by Booth Tarkington’s The Flirt.

There were no radio or television advertisements, but several ads for Grafonolas, Gramophones, Victrolas, and Graphophones! . . . Incidentally, even then Edison had predicted the coming of sound in motion pictures . . . —Michael Foran, Toronto. ★