Dear Special Register

In which a famous writer makes an imaginary attempt to crash Canada's newest catalogue of the upper crust

October 11 1958

Dear Special Register

In which a famous writer makes an imaginary attempt to crash Canada's newest catalogue of the upper crust

October 11 1958

Dear Special Register

In which a famous writer makes an imaginary attempt to crash Canada's newest catalogue of the upper crust

106 Clifferton Street, Toronto, Ontario.

The Editor,

The Social Register of Canada,

69 Bloor Street East,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Sir:

I feel it my duty to add my voice to the protests of those who are opposed to the publication of the Social Register, which I understand is to be issued this Fall.

This project is an affront to everyone who takes pride in the spirit and principles on which this country was founded. Although Canada, unlike its neighbor to the south, jealously retained its ties with Britain and the Monarchy, it was built by men and women who renounced the old-world tradition of inherited privileges and social position, to begin a new life in a land where a man was judged solely by his courage, industry and the skill of his two hands.

I don't know what the requirements are for being included in The Social Register, as 1 received no nomination form (actually, I find this rather amusing, as there was an Allen mentioned in Inglewood's Saxon Chronicles—Alan the Wake, a name he was given for alerting a town in Derbyshire to the Norman invasion by shouting “Awake! Awake!” or from someone shouting this at him) but I assure you, whatever the qualifications they are not those that were sought in the first men and women who settled these shores.

In disgust

THE SOCIAL REGISTER OF CANADA 69 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Canada.

Mr. R. Allen,

106 Clifferton Street,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Mr. Allen:

There has been a regrettable error in mailing the nomination forms for the forthcoming Canadian Social Register. Your application was supposed to be sent out five days ago, but as this is the first publication of its kind in Canada, you can understand

that there is bound to be a certain confusion and a great deal of unfamiliar territory to be covered. Please accept our apologies. The form is being mailed today.

We would be grateful if you would fill out the details of your family background, listing professional designation, honours, orders or decorations, academic degrees and club memberships.

Sincerely

Acting Secretary

P.S. I found the reference to Inglewood's Saxon Chronicles very interesting.

106 Clifferton Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Miss Linda Tyrell,

The Social Register of Canada,

69 Bloor Street East,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Miss Tyrell:

Extremely good of you to write. There’s no need for apologies. I fully appreciate the enormous task you have set yourself and realize that a project of this nature can't go through without a few slip-ups.

1 am beginning at once to collect the material you requested regarding my family background. In the meantime. I understand that The Social Register will be available only to those who have been selected for inclusion in the Register itself. I'd like to reserve four copies if 1 may and if you’ll let me know what the cost will be I will send a cheque in advance, by return mail.

With very best regards

106 Clifferton Street, Toronto, Ontario

I may be wrong about this, but didn’t you mention one time when you were at our place that someone in our family in Derbyshire had a title? Do you

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remember who this was, and how we are connected? I need this for a book I thinking of writing. Aunt Charlotte told me the last time she wrote that she read my Paton Place in Maclean’s and doesn't wonder that wtis banned in Canada. Ibis was just a take-off on Peyton Place, and had name that sounded something like it. Would Uncle Bert know anything about what I want to know—whether there was anyone in our family with title. Love Bob

93 Boyle Street, Montreal, P.Q.

Dear Bobsy:

Emily tells me that you are writing a book about your Uncle Bert. Your Uncle Harry could tell you more about him than 1 can. One thing I remember is that he came from a side of the family that had a peculiar formation of teeth that met at the back but didn't meet at the front. Everyone in the family used to have an awful time eating anything like a ham sandwich. You should get your Uncle Harry to tell you about it. He'd have you in stitches. He was always very strong and they say that when he was in the cartage business he could carry anything up a ladder that they could hang over his head. I don't know whether these things will be of any help.

We still all follow Gordon Sinclair. Have you ever met him? Are you getting much work?

Love from A tint Charlotte

103 Boyle Street, Montreal, P.Q.

Dear Bob:

Em told me about you wanting to know about a relative in Derbyshire with a title. He was a great uncle of yours and was known as a slabber. He used to be called in whenever any of those big families went on trips to Europe to pack their chinaware. He worked for the Connaughts for years. Slabbing has pretty well gone out now as they can't get apprentices.

Yours truly Uncle Perce

THE SOCIAL REGISTER OF CANADA 69 Bloor Street East,

Toronto, Canada.

Mr. R. Allen,

106 ClifTerton Street,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Mr. Allen:

I am extremely sorry, but since 1 last wrote to you it has come to my attention that you have been addressed in error, and the nomination forms 1 spoke of were intended for a Mr. Robert TytheAllen of DeChauncey Terraces, whom I'm sure you know. If we have caused you any trouble or embarrassment I am extremely sorry.

Sincerely Linda Tyrell

106 ClifTerton Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Aunt Edith:

I’m writing this in a rush, so I won't take time to write a letter, but would you let me know if anyone in our family lives at DeChauncey Terraces? It's a new apartment building in North Toronto. How’s Uncle Harry?

Love from all Bob

Brock Apartments, Torontos Ontario.

Dear Babe:

There’s none of our family that I know of who live in DeChauncey Terraces. Most of them are still out near the old turning basin. But it’s funny you mentioning it, as your Uncle Harry was just talking about DeChauncey Terraces last night. He says there isn’t a joist in the building with less than thirty-six-inch centres (you’ll probably know what this means) and that they just put one coat of tar on the roof. He laid bricks there, you know, so he should know what he’s talking about. There’s a funny story about that, too. The man in charge of choosing the color for painting the walls saw your Uncle Harry and pointed to his shirt and said that was the color he wanted. And that’s the blue they used, the same color as your Uncle Harry’s shirt. I don’t know if this is any help to you.

Love

A lint Edith

93 Boyle Street, Montreal, P.Q.

Dear Bob:

Your Aunt Charlotte says you wanted

to know something about me for a book. Will you be coming down this way? Did I ever tell you that 1 worked on the first trains that went through to Vancouver? It was my job when anything went wrong to crawl along a kind of platform and stay there no matter what kind of weather until I found out what was wrong. I could tel! you a lot of things, some of them that nobody would hardly believe, like the time I went in for raising pink-eyed rabbits. I've always thought I could write a book if 1 could just put it together. But we’d have to sit down together to do if right. Let me know if you want any more, will you?

Yours

Uncle Bert

106 ClifTerton Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Miss Linda Tyrell,

The Social Register of Canada,

69 Bloor Street East,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Miss Tyrell:

1 received your letter about my name being confused with that of a Robert Tythe-AIlen. This is the second time 1 have been annoyed by receiving material for The Social Register of Canada, about which there seems to be inordinate confusion. I wish you would get your files arranged as my time is as valuable as yours, and it is a nuisance to have to keep corresponding about a matter in which I haven't the slightest interest, and which, frankly, I feel reveals a rare bit of snobbery that has no place in Canada.

Yours very truly

Robert Thomas Allen