PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

May 10 1958
PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

May 10 1958

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

MACLEAN’S

^ Big boom ahead in golf with 40 new courses ^ Clamp-down coming on mail-order job sharks

THERE WILL BE NO RECESSION IN GOLF this year; instead you’ll see the biggest boom in 30 years. Forty new courses are being built or are in planning stage in the country, more than have been built in two decades. Golf associations expect 350,000 players—a jump of 50,000— recording to a Maclean’s survey. There are 15,000 juniors and 40,000 women swinging clubs around the nation’s 631 courses. A fad likely to rival old-time miniature golf, say officials, is the Par-3 course, booming in the U. S. and now growing in numbers in Canada.

It’s shorter and cuts playing time in half.

PREMARITAL BLOOD TESTS, a burning social issue when prairie provinces and P.E.I. made them mandatory (other provinces merely recommend them), may soon be dropped by most provincial health departments. The reason: new cases of VD in Canada last year (16,000) were only one quarter the number in 1946, and few of these were brought *o light by premarital tests. Many provinces think VD will soon vanish as a health problem and detection can be safely left to pre-employment, pre-natal, armed services and other examinations.

LONG-DISTANCE SWIMS are heading for the limbo of donkey baseball and other crazes and may die altogether in Canada this year. CNE directors say they won’t sponsor a Lake Ontario marathon— for the first time in 31 years — and they’ll ignore anyone who tries the 40 miles across the lake. “Marilyn Bell killed interest by swimming the lake,” explained one director. “After that everything was anti-climax.” Montreal teen-ager Aloma Keen, being groomed to succeed retired Marilyn, has lost her sponsor. Dominion Dairies. “No interest in marathon swims,” said a company official.

LOOK FOR POST-OFFICE WATCHDOGS and better business bureaus to clamp down soon on mail-order job agencies capitalizing on the recession by offering “high-paying jobs” that in most cases never pan out. In the guise of “interesting work in foreign countries’’ one outfit sends you (for $2) a list of construction firms doing business in these countries. The old homework racket is back — with trimmings. You are now promised $50 a week as proceeds from growing herbs, selling baby boots, writing letters “if you are sincere and honest and send a $2 deposit.” BBB officials who have investigated say few make money and the deposit is never returned.

WORLD’S BIGGEST OIL FIELDS (Texas and Saudi Arabia) may sooner or later find a peer in Canada’s Mackenzie River delta, where Arctic’s first major oil rush is now gathering steam. Eight firms have applied for leases on 22 million acres; $25 million will be spent on exploration in the next two years. Government geologists say that structurally it could be the world’s richest field: Devonian limestone in which oil occurs is three times as thick in the delta as in booming Leduc’s fields; 75,000 square miles have heen proven favorable to oil (in all Alberta there are 124,000 square miles of oil-favorable country).*

DON’T BE SURPRISED if your short-wave this summer picks up “CBC is now joining the Eskimo network.” CBC is. Prosperous with DEWline earnings hundreds of Canada's Eskimos have radios, but chief entertainment is provided by Russian broadcasts since CBC reception is sporadic. Now CBC is negotiating program exchanges with Radio Greenland which will broadcast in Eskimo to our Eskimos. Chief announcer Frederik Neilson, a Greenland Eskimo, speaks Danish, French, German, as well as several Eskimo dialects. Via the powerful Greenland station Eskimos will also get Juliette and other CBC programs.

A NEW COMPUT ER will cut to less than two years the time we take for a national census, if DBS decides it can afford the $3 million it costs. The 1941 census took 10 years to complete and the 1951 census — partly mechanized — three years. The new machine would also be used to cut red tape and speed up work in other government departments.