Parade

Parade

And baby makes three

June 21 1958
Parade

Parade

And baby makes three

June 21 1958

Parade

And baby makes three

Remember when bribery was the only way to get an apartment—and then only if you were prepared to put your children in an orphanage? Things have certainly changed in London, Ont., where the Free Press recently carried

One-bedroom apartment. East L.ondon, upper duplex, well decorated, laundry, parking facilities. One infant welcome or would furnish same for good reliable tenants . . .

this advertisement in its To Rent column:

* * *

Out for a stroll in a residential section of Montreal she refuses to identify, in order to protect the victim of this story, a local resident spied an alertlooking constable spying on traffic with his notebook at the ready. FI is eyes would follow a car and he’d make an entry in his book; a moment later he’d peer after another driver and make another entry. Our woman stroller couldn't resist peering into the constable’s little black book as she drew near him. Folded neatly between its pages he had the crossword puzzle from the morning paper, and he had it half done.

* * *

Talk about your days of real sport! Luckiest grade-niners in Canada are the

Saskatoon Collegiate classmates of a

lad whose father is a doctor and an

instructor of medical students at the city’s University hospital. If you're a good pal of the doctor's kid you can volunteer to be a guinea pig for medical science, get an arm or a leg put in a demonstration cast, swank around the neighborhood like a hero—and get paid by the hour.

* * *

A fellow in a big fintail special went roaring in and out of a line of Toronto traffic, annoying everybody and infuriating a guy in a little foreign car whom he

almost sideswiped. The little car roared after the big one and thanks to a snarl of traffic caught it at a traffic light at the brow of a hill. The pursuer got out of his little car to tell off the guy in the big car for being a careless thoughtless driver who was going to hurt somebody, but he was interrupted by a loud crunch. He’d been so mad he'd forgotten to put the brake on and his own car had rolled

back down the hill into another.

* * *

Money isn't the only thing you’re liable to have less of after retirement and we don't know which consideration prompted the sign in a Hamilton, Ont., barber shop: “Haircuts 75c—Old Men’s 50c.”

* * *

A Parade scout in Yarmouth, N.S., says she thinks there may be a story in a postman down that way whose run

starts at West Dublin and whose first

stop is the Bush Island post office. To get there he drives along a road that clings to the top of the sand dunes on a narrow neck of land with the sea on both sides. Then he takes off in a onecylinder dory for a thirty-minute ocean voyage to Bush Island where he dumps his mailbags. Our Scout promises to flash the word the first time she hears about the postman getting bit by a dogfish.

* * *

A little thing like a little unemployment isn't going to dampen any westcoast spirits during Centennial year. Why, there's a big sign in the window of a union hall on Vancouver’s Pender St.,

where the jobless come looking for work, and the sign bids them “Smile! ! —life in British Columbia is wonderful!"

* * *

There's a modern home in Hamilton. Ont., equipped with every known laborsaving device from an electric cocktail mixer to an automatic laundry, and its occupants include a ten-year-old girl who came home from domestic-science class wide-eyed. “Teacher has the most wonderful gadget for doing your washing with—she calls it a scrubbing board and it just makes washing so much fun!’’

S5 LO S10 for true, humorous anecdotes reflecting the current Canadian scene. No contributions can be returned.

Address Parade, c/o Maclean's Magazine, 481 University Avenue, Toronto 2, Ontario.