Background

Background

YANK $ $ GO HOME

July 19 1958
Background

Background

YANK $ $ GO HOME

July 19 1958

Background

YANK $ $ GO HOME

The cry is "Come Back, Yank!” not "Go Home!” in St. John’s, Newfoundland, which will lose $15 million a year with the closing of Pepperell, the nearby U. S. Air Force base. Some 1,700 residents will lose jobs that pay them $6,743.000 a year, businessmen will drop $4.300,000 spent by the U. S. supplying the base and another $3,000,000 spent by airmen. Pepperell’s radar duties will be absorbed by Harmon Field in the west of Newfoundland.

St. John’s hopes the Canadian Army will move in.

TRUTH ABOUT SAUCERS?

You don’t see flying saucers; you dream them. This is the opinion of eminent Swiss psychologist Carl Gustav Jung, who thoroughly debunks one of the leading phenomena of our age in a new book. Ein Moderner Mythus—A Modern Myth. Jung’s idea: unable to cope with our troubles, we create in our minds mystic tales about approaching heavenly forces. Saucers, he says, are “99% a psychic product and therefore suited for analysis.”

HELP WANTED: First-rate character actors. Apply CBC and National Film Board—both slightly disillusioned with native thespians after watching a pilot film for a TV series

on W. O. Mitchell’s Jake and the Kid. Mitchell's folksy characters emerged so colorless they thought of shelving the series but are scouting moneymaking possibilities in U. S. and U. K. Trouble? “Canadian character actors can’t play anyone except themselves,” says an NFB producer.

NEW NORTH GHOST TOWN

Shed a tear for Aklavik, Canada’s newest ghost town. Cry too for Christina Norris’ boardinghouse— most famous in the far northwest —the Aklavik Hotel and the town’s two coffee houses. They’re boarded up now. The reason: everybody’s moving to East Three, the new Mecca on the Mackenzie River delta — soon to be known as Arctic City.

It has hot-and-cold running water, army and air-transport facilities. True to tradition, however, Hudson's Bay Company will stay in Aklavik.

BOOM IN BRITISH BUTLERS

Butlers have become a modest rival to sports cars among British exports. London calls it a “butler boom” with about 400 moving to the U. S. — and a few to Canada — in the past year. If you want a butler you undergo a tough screening. “Our butlers have very high standards,” says Peter Hunt, head of one exclusive London agency. “Manners are more important than money.” Nevertheless, butlers come high — boat fare plus $250 a month plus room and board.