Mailbag

Mailbag

July 19 1958
Mailbag

Mailbag

July 19 1958

Mailbag

I READ WITH greatest pleasure Thomas Raddall’s story of Barrington Street (June 7) . . . filled with lively word pictures, warm feeling and wit. But oh! the late Angus L. Macdonald would surely revoke his permission for Tom to “wear any tartan you like— even the Macdonald!” if he knew that the feather bonnet was referred to as a "plumed black busby,” and the kilt was mentioned more than once as “kilts.”— HELL DOUGLAS TAYLOR, MONTREAL.

^ Should you call a feather bonnet a busby?

^ Is Thomas Raddall correct in using the expression “kilts” (worn by Ralph Connor in the pulpit)? Should it not be "the kilt”? Also I understand the Black Watch Pipers wear feather bonnets, not

^ $1,000 if you can prove there’s featherbedding ^ It’s a tie between Mowat and Callaghan

busbies. The latter headgear is worn by such regiments as Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Welsh Guards, Irish Guards. - M. I. PARR, LACHINE,

OUE.

Mr. Raddall stands corrected on the kilt but insists on “busby” for the Black Watch: “It’s nothing like a bonnet and no more highland than my Aunt Emma. It’s just a feathered imitation of the bearskin. Out of sheer cussedness / call it a busby.”

The record of refugee college

I read the article, Backstage at Refugee College, by Frank Walden (Preview June 21), with much interest. While I do not quarrel with the general accuracy of the statements made, I feel that Mr. Walden has been less than kind ... in respect of our Hungarian students. The circumstances under which they left Hungary, the decision to come to Canada, and the problems of adjustment . . . must be unusually difficult for the best of human beings to accept and overcome. Dean Roller, his colleagues and the Hungarian students have been exceptional in every respect, and the fact that they have not complained or created any problems for the rest of us in the university is the best evidence of this. I am certain that, given time, they will make a valuable contribution over the years to the Canadian economy, society and nation.—

N. A. M. MACKENZIE, PRESIDENT, U.B.C.

“No proof of featherbedding”

There is no doubt in my mind that your article. The Fear Behind Featherbedding (June 21). will rouse many comments. I would like to add mine. Contrary to the myth, there is no limit except human endurance to the number of bricks that a bricklayer may lay in a day. Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers International Union HAS A STANDING OFFER OF S 1,000 TO ANYONE WHO CAN

SHOW PROOF OF SUCH A POLICY ON THE PART OF ANY SUBORDINATE UNION LOCAL. — KEN THOMPSON, SECRETARY, BRICKLAYERS’ LOCAL NO. 1, EDMONTON.

Mowat vs. Callaghan

Please accept my congratulations on the article by Farley Mowat (Let’s Get Tough with the U. S., June 7). His phrases are blunt and to the point. We have had a surfeit of such writers as Morley Callaghan (Let’s Go Easy on the U. S.). It has become fashionable to be ashamed to be a Canadian . . . Mr. Callaghan’s article makes me ASHAMED.-G. E. HOLTBY, MONO ROAD, ONT.

^ Your publication of Farley Mowat’s fanatical, belligerent attack on Americans is a disgrace to Canadian nationalism.-J. N. MCDONALD, DENVER, pOLO.

^ ... \ heartily agree with Mr. Mowat’s suggestion of the spineless nonentity of too many Canadians ... —

EARL A. LASHER, CRESTON, B.C.

** To Morley Callaghan’s emphasis on Canadian nationalism I say nuts. There ain’t no such thing. . . - LINACRE BUTCHER, WELLINGTON, B.C.

^ Cheers for Morley Callaghan. It’s almost time Canadians started to grow

up. . . - JOE BARR, SARNIA, ONT.

Mailbag’s up-to-date box score of letters received on the Mowat-Callaghan argument: For Mowat 18; against Mowat 16; for Callaghan 7; against Callaghan 7; neutral 14.

Is peeling spuds hateful?

Your Preview note on the potato business (“Housewives hate to peel ’em,” June 21) isn’t appreciated by housewives I know. We’ll gladly peel potatoes when we can buy good ones. (Or

we can always bake them, more nutritious, taste better, no peeling.) . . .— MRS. D. JOHNSTON, NORTH VANCOUVER.

Benburb battle no myth

Regarding Alan Phillips’ article, The Last Angry Tory (June 7), he does not say if Gratton O’Leary let Donald Gordon get away with the idea that there was no battle of Benburb. Benburb is a village in the Irish county of Tyrone. There in the sixteenth century the Irish followers of "The O’Neill” met and decisively defeated an English army belonging to Queen Elizabeth. Irish history cannot be a strongpoint of Gordon’s. — J. HENDERSON, WILLOWDALE, ONT. ★