PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

August 30 1958
PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

August 30 1958

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

^An Iraqi mystery: Can Canadian wife get out? ^Why people get old—Ontario to study ageing

NOW THAT THE SEAWAY'S NEARLY FINISHED, the next big hand-in-hand chore for the U. S. and Canada may be paving the Alaska Highway, but this time the U. S. will have to talk us into it. Inspired by statehood for Alaska, the U. S. pressure to pave the road (now administered by the Canadian Army) is mounting. But Canada, bold bridegroom of Seaway negotiations, is a reluctant bride now. Objections: The cost (estimated $250 million) is too high; Americans ought to pay more than their proposed 50-50 share; Canada’s already up to its eyes in bills for the South Saskatchewan Dam and roads in the tar north.

ONE OF THE QUESTIONS IN IRAQ that's still waiting for an answer: Will Saskatchewan-born Sarah Powell Jamali get out safely? Her chances look fair. Maclean’s Blair Fraser reports from the Middle East. Her husband, deposed foreign minister Fadhil Jamali, is in jail but Sarah and son Abbas “are hiding in the home of Baghdad friends. Few know where, fewer still have seen her since the revolution. Despite assurances by the new government that it won t harm wives of members of the old regime, she prefers to keep out of sight.” Her best hope: ‘Her parents Sarah were American; she has maintained her U. S. citizenship.

When or if she decides to leave she's entitled to American protection."

A NEW KIND OF ACCIDENT INSURANCE will be offered through some schools this fall in an effort to meet the growing cost and frequency of children's accidents. It will be oflered to parents tor around $4 a year and will protect youngsters 24 hours a day except during holidays. Accident insurance now available through schools costs $1 to $2 (laige school districts usually get the cheaper rate) but protects children only during school hours on school property. In addition, most school hoards carry liability insurance (they pay $22 for the first tour classrooms, $2.50 a class after that for coverage up to $5,000 for one child). One uninsured Ontario board recently had to pay $30,000 to a boy injured swinging.

WHAT MAKES PEOPLE GROW OLD, and why do some grow old quicker than others? The Ontario government intends to find out by selecting 2,000 men and women (age 45) and keeping monthly tab on them for up to 20 years. Sociologist Lawrence Crawford will supervise the survey starting this fall. His experts will get answers to such questions as. Do the people stay in one place, in one job? Do they live a quiet lite or burn the candle at both ends? Does wealth bring health and seienity or is the opposite true? “We don't know what we 11 lind, says Crawford, “but it will he brand-new.”

CANADA’S PIONEER ADVENTURERS may ultimately rival American frontier marshals as film heroes if the movies passion tor C anadian history keeps growing. With the stories ot Pierre Radisson and the RCMP already on film, Toronto's Michael Sadlier will soon start shooting Tales of Hudson’s Bay for United Artists, with a lot of the script material from HBC’s long-locked files. Scenes will be northern Canada; writers and most actors will be Canadian. Next subject being scouted tor films:

HBC’s fur-trading rival, the Northwest Company.

CYRIL THE SEA LION’S MEMORABLE SWIM

in Lake Erie is going to enable London’s Storybook Gardens, from which he escaped, to buy more animals and build new zoo settings (animals are shown in exhibits such as Old MacDonalds Farm, Jack and Jill’s Hill). In the first month after Cyril’s return he was such a big attraction that more than 110,000 paid $22,500 to get into the Gardens to see him. Receipts for the whole summer at the zoo this year had been budgeted at only $10,000 before Cyril went swimming. Cyril had something to show the crowds: 150 lamprey hites. Among newcomers joining lordly Cyril: two more seals.