Backstage

BACKSTAGE WITH THE GREATEST CRIMINALS IN HISTORY

Tranquilizer makers psychoanalyze an all-time rogues’ gallery / Why murder? / Why pillage?

September 13 1958
Backstage

BACKSTAGE WITH THE GREATEST CRIMINALS IN HISTORY

Tranquilizer makers psychoanalyze an all-time rogues’ gallery / Why murder? / Why pillage?

September 13 1958

BACKSTAGE WITH THE GREATEST CRIMINALS IN HISTORY

Backstage

Tranquilizer makers psychoanalyze an all-time rogues’ gallery / Why murder? / Why pillage?

IN WINNIPEG

CRIMES

arson, rape, murder

PERSONALITY

PATTERN

“classic”

juvenile delinquent, psychopath

CRIMES

systematic murder, seduction and perfidy

PERSONALITY

PATTERN

psychopath

CRIMES mass murder, terrorism PERSONALITY PATTERN paranoia

CESARE BORGIA CRIMES murder and assassination PERSONALITY PATTERN paranoid, deviant psycho-sexual make-up

GENGHIS KHAN CRIMES global war, mass annihilation

PERSONALITY

PATTERN

genius

WHATEVER EFFECT tranquilizing drugs are having on your neighbors, several eminent U. S. psychiatrists have decided what they would have done for some of the most famous wrong-doers in history. To do it, they first anal-

yzed the personalities of a list of big-time transgressors. In every case, they decided the miscreants would have led constructive lawabiding lives if they'd been slipped a tranquilizer now and then. Since the project was sponsored by a

drug company to promote a new tranquilizer of its own. this finding isn't surprising. What is surprising, and intriguing, is the descriptions the psychiatrists give of the men in their all-time rogues’ gallery. You'll find them at the top of this page.

Backstage WITH THE RECESSION

We re recovering faster than the U.S. / Here’s the evidence

CANADA is climbing out of the recession much faster than the U. S., Ottawa economists who'vc been studying the trends in both countries are now ready to state flatly. And their boss, Trade Minister Gordon Churchill, measures the Canadian recession as of "more moderate proportions” than the Americans’ right from the beginning.

This doesn’t mean the boom is back. Unemployment in both countries is still bad: 7.1% of the labor force in the U. S., lower in Canada but still, at 5.2%, twice as high as it was a year ago. Corporation profits in both countries are down 20-30%. But other yardsticks of business activity vary widely between the U. S. and Canada, with the edge on our side in most cases.

The American index of industrial production has plummeted

15% since August 1957. In Canada industrial production dropped only 7% between February and December of 1957, and has been rising ever since. Consumer spending has gone up considerably in Canada but has increased only slightly in the U. S. Canadians kept right on spending for pleasure; this summer they bought $30 million worth of pleasure craft and boating equipment; hi-fi sales are up 25% over a year ago.

Housing starts are up barely 2% in the U. S., a spectacular 84% here. The volume of building permits, commercial and residential, being issued by Canadian municipalities, is up by 35%. Canadian builders predict they may complete

150.000 new homes this year, compared with a previous record of

138.000 in 1955. This could mean sales of a quarter billion dollars in appliances and furnishings.

Trade boss Churchill: going up?

Steel ingot production, one of the most reliable indicators of economic activity, has been running at only 60% of capacity in the U. S. Until the strike closed the Steel Co. of Canada blast furnaces in Hamilton. Canadian steel mills were making use of 72% of their capacity.

These figures look hopeful and are. But Canadians can’t crow too loudly about our recovery edge over the U. S. Economists warn our recovery can only go on gaining strength as long as the U. S. business machine keeps getting healthier at the same time.

-PETER C. NEWMAN

Who’ll win the flaring supermarket war? Nobody knows, but housewives can’t lose

WHEN four thousand people snake-danced into a. new Loblaw supermarket in Winnipegs suburban Fort Garry last July, the noisiest retail war in local history was touched ofi with a bang. I he prize: the $88.4 million Greater Winnipeggers, some 455.000 strong, spent on groceries last year. I he adversaries: Loblaw’s. Safeway Stores, Dominion Stores. A & P. Shop-Easy and 1.400-odd independent neighborhood grocery stores. The weapons: bands, banners, tree groceries, give-away draws for everything from cars and mink stoles to cocker spaniels, cut prices and cops to keep the customers moving.

The hoopla and razzle-dazzle have been mounting ever since and show no signs of reaching a peak before next spring. Loblaw’s opened a second supermarket in nearby St. Vital within days of the first and revealed plans to spend $10 million on eight more in the Winnipeg area alone, $25 million all told in

the west. Dominion Stores was hot on Loblaw’s heels with the field-day opening of a million-dollar Winnipeg market, and has five more on the way. Safeway’s. the biggest entrenched local chain, is reportedly rushing plans for three new giants to join its 39-store chain. A &. P is drafting additions to its five-store group. A host of independents have closed ranks to buy in bulk and pool advertising budgets.

Where will the dollars come from when the giveaways and fancy cut rates give out? A month after the cannonade of give-aways started, a check of all the leading combatants produced a standard answer: "We don't know about the other fellows, but we’re doing fine.” Earlier, Loblaw president G. C. Metcalf, in Winnipeg (which he called “the most exciting city in Canada") to help whoop up his company’s first store opening, feinted one answer: "From new population and newly married people.” Plus, he admitted, customers of his competitors.

One rich new vein is being tapped. Increasing numbers of rural Manitobans within reasonable driving distance of the city are shopping for their groceries in Greater Winnipeg. In case this worries Winnipeg shoppers who are getting used to being wooed away from their grocery money by generous suitors, Maclean’s learned at press time that there’s probably at least one more round of give - aways ahead. By the time the Canadian chains have settled down an American store group, as yet unnamed, plans to jump into the fight with a series of shopping centres built around big grocery supermarkets. Loblaw President Metcalf:

—ROBERT METCALFE give-aways brought crowds