Mailbag

Mailbag

September 27 1958
Mailbag

Mailbag

September 27 1958

Mailbag

See that you are requesting comments on the cover, whether we like cartoontype covers or a billboard (In the Editors’ Confidence, Aug. 30). Frankly, I like it just as it is. The cover is distinctive and, may I say, exclusive. It has a charm American magazines that print their contents on the cover do not HAVE.-JEAN GUY HOUDE, GIFFARD, QUE.

* The very thought of you denying us the covers of Macpherson and Hill has set me raging. To think that you have the audacity to consider substituting them with a pseudo-American hog-call-

Should we remodel our cover? Most say “No!"

* Our “hated cops": would it hurt them to smile?

ing-type cover makes the maple leaves in my blood turn to bourbon. Don't you DARE!-ROBERT C. WILLIAMS, BRAMPTON, ONT.

* Stop making our rivers “highways of sewage"!

* ... A cover should be a picture depicting humorously or dramatically or even satirically some aspect of life around us. You have always done that superbly well. Why change IT?-H. W.

S. SOULSBY, VICTORIA.

* North, South, East or West,

Your front-page covers are the very best.

No change is needed, they are really fine;

That’s why I had to tell you so in RHYME.-MRS. VERA ISNOR, HALIFAX.

* ... If I receive a Maclean’s with a poster cover I promise not to peruse that highly amusing contributor, Simpkins (Jasper), and not to renew the subscription to Maclean’s which expires in 2061. If this threat is not sufficient I’ll creep up to your place on my stomach and shake my fist at you.—i. M. RIIANT, WINNIPEG.

* . . . We enjoy Franklin Arbuckle’s paintings, and our daughters are especially appreciative of Peter Whalley’s work.—MRS. K. D. MCGEE, CARP, ONT.

^ Give me a cover to make me smile, then let me have the fun of leafing through the magazine. Just like reading a menu and savoring what is to come. —MRS. W. CARLTON MCCALL, OKANAGAN

FALLS, B.C.

For goodness sake, for your sake and for my sake, please keep your regular type of COVER.-LORNE WANZEL,

VANCOUVER.

v “Punch” has been called the historian of his own times. I propose the simile, “As Canadian as MACLEAN’S!” Cover designs as before, PLEASE!-D. L.

WHITBY, TRURO, N.S.

Leave your cover alone . . .-GORDON ELLIOTT, OTTAWA.

* Please stay as you ARE.-MRS. MARY

BLAIR, VANCOUVER.

* Contents cover for Maclean’s? No,

No!-MRS. J. WATT, BEVERLY, ALTA.

*■" . . . Your cartoon covers were just a bit different from any other magazine. —EVA LYMAN, VANCOUVER.

Our “highways of sewage”

I wish to commend your editorial, The Princess and the Don (Aug. 30). As a child I used to play in the old Don. It was always a great concern to me that we allowed both the Don and the Humber to become simply highways for sewage. It is hard now to believe that in the 1880s Atlantic salmon were caught in the DON.-REV. CANON J. C. CLOUGH, WINNIPEG.

* The deplorable mess of dumped garbage along the banks of many of our lovely lakes and streams seems unpardonable. I trust editorials such as yours will serve a very necessary purpose.—

MRS. M. MaCLEAN, STELLARTON, N.S.

Tip for the police: Smile!

Why Do We Hate the Police? (Aug. 30). Answer: I haven’t met a polite or smiling policeman. They are brusque, bullying and bad-mannered. Inaugurate courtesy campaigns. Focus public atten-

tion on the policeman’s ability to be polite. Have him SMILE.-R. T. BUCKLEY, OTTAWA.

^ Are the police not having enough trouble trying to defend law-abiding citizens without you advertising the ridiculous suggestion that WE hate them? . . .—FRANK C. HIGHFIELD, LADYSMITH, B.C.

* Why Do We Hate The Police? Don’t you think that our geographical position has quite a lot to do with that question? As long as Americans are so indifferent to law-breaking and continue to tolerate the Lucky Lucianos, the Licavolis, the AÍ Capones, then we can look for trouble here . . .-L. MCDONNELL, VANCOUVER.

What Callaghan missed

As a former Torontonian in Montreal, close to the haunts Morley Callaghan visited on his recent Holiday Weekend in Montreal (Aug. 30), I thoroughly enjoyed his reminiscing. I have dined in many of the places he mentions and am only sorry he did not discover Café André on Victoria St., just south of Sherbrooke. It is crowded here in the typical French-Canadian manner . . .— G. L. BRISLEY, MONTREAL. +