Parade

Parade

School bells go for round one

September 26 1959
Parade

Parade

School bells go for round one

September 26 1959

Parade

School bells go for round one

A motorist in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., pulled up obediently at the signal of a school-crossing guard. Then he noticed there were two youthful guards on duty, one marching to meet the other and his convoy of little charges in the middle of the street. But he further noted that one guard also handed over the cigarette he was smoking to the other lad, who puffed his way back to the curb and returned it on his next trip.

* * *

A family moving into a new Montreal suburb on Labor Day were overwhelmed by the courteousness and eagerness to help of the five sturdy young sons of the family next door. When the neighbors were discovered to be recent arrivals from Germany the Canadian couple said to each other knowingly, “Hah — that’s sound Teutonic discipline for you!” Early next morning, first day of school, they noticed the German father line up his brood on the front lawn with a few short words of command, and the Canadian couple crowded the window expecting to watch a well-drilled session of family physical jerks. Then as the lads all snapped to attention in their fresh white shirts and neatly pressed pants, the proud father produced a camera and snapped their picture.

* * *

Autumn is a glorious season but in Western Canada the blizzard warnings were out before summer ended. Adilman’s department store in Saskatoon,

Sask., was advertising a mid-winter sale in early August. And one day while the temperature stood at 101 in Winnipeg a motorist found himself stuck behind a truck on the rear of which was a sign: “Detour — standing by to thaw frozen hydrants.”

* * *

We trust a sister is back at her firstgrade post in a Quebec City school, despite the shattering experience she suffered just before school closed. Teaching her class about the mystical body of the church she enquired, "Can anybody tell me what is the name of the large family

of which all the members help one another, are always happy and love each other all the time?” A little girl in the front row brightened, flapped her arm excitedly, and chirped knowingly, “The Plouffe family.”

* * *

Few teachers have gone back to their blackboards more confidently than the woman from this side of the border who now, having married a Texan, finds herself facing pupils in a Dallas school. What did it was a note from a seve.i-

year-old: “Dear Mrs. R.....: I think

your the best arithmetic teacher I have. And for a Canadian I think you speak the best English.”

* * *

All went well on opening day in a school in Red Deer, Alta., right up to dismissal time when teacher chose a boy and girl who had been in the same junior classroom the previous year to lead the class safely out of school. Bobby got the boys out all right, but you can imagine Margaret’s mother’s surprise when she looked out the parlor window to see her daughter firmly leading fifteen other little girls up the front steps and into the house.

* * *

School bells are ringing, as teachers again take up the unequal struggle between pedagogue and pupil, not to mention the PTA. One newly retired principal is sitting happily at home in Edmonton, however, reflecting that never again will he get into trouble with the Home and School Association for keeping a little brown jug — which looked like a whisky container — on his desk. Why. the fuss didn't die down until the school board issued brown Betty teapots instead, to be used in all schools for refilling ink wells.

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