THIS FORTNIGHT

NEW BOOKS

RF November 17 1962
THIS FORTNIGHT

NEW BOOKS

RF November 17 1962

NEW BOOKS

THE CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTION OF 1957: It was only five years ago that Canadian voters made John Diefenbaker prime minister in the most dramatic upset of our political history. Here Professor John Meisel of Queen’s University describes Diefenbaker’s path to power and examines the stream of events which make up a general election in Canada. As an exercise in contemporary history, this is an invaluable contribution; as an example of lively prose writing, however, it falls short of the stature which might have added it to the small shelf of readable volumes on Canadian politics. Meisel is at his best in contrasting the dynamic organizational elements that made up the Tory campaign with the arrogant disorder of Liberal tactics. He has managed to obtain a frank disclosure of Tory election costs (Diefenbaker’s magnificent campaign, at $3.5 million, cost only one third as much as the sloppy, foredoomed effort of the Liberals) and his statistical research provides insight into the election results of unprecedented clarity. (University of Toronto, $6.50, 327 pages.) PCN

139“ A FRAGMENT OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY: John Gunther, who started out as a newspaper correspondent and still calls himself a reporter, has recently deposited his manuscripts and papers with the library of the University of Chicago. This immediately puts him in the class of literary man and thereby entitles him to write a book about how he wrote his books. This one is subtitled, “The fun of writing the Inside books.” It’s a lively account of covering, sometimes breathlessly but always efficiently, Europe, Asia, Latin America, U. S. A., Africa, Russia and Europe (again). Next? Gunther has talked about doing Australia for a long time, but he also mentions the possibility that he might try Inside Canada sometime in the near future. (Mussen, $3.85, 116 pages.) RF