BACKGROUND

Will success spoil Mary Morrison’s campaign?

RAY TULLOCH June 30 1962
BACKGROUND

Will success spoil Mary Morrison’s campaign?

RAY TULLOCH June 30 1962

FOOTNOTES

About jazz musicians: Three University of Pittsburgh doctors have studied 30 of the world’s top performers and found them as far out as the music they play. In youth, the musicians turned to jazz to escape conformity and a dominant parent — usually mom. Aggressive types went for the loud brasses and percussion instruments while the passive rebels took up reeds and strings. Most were married and divorced early, and four out of five had a record of indulgence in liquor, drugs and promiscuity. The doctors found one note on the upbeat; some of the musicians married good women later in life.

About native industries: A New

York department store recently advertised “imported Canadian baby carriages . . . the world’s best.”

About neuroses: They can be “contagious” within a family, according to a report given to the Society of Medical Psychoanalysts in New York. Dr. Jan Ehrenwald, who studied four generations of a single family, said the "pattern of contagion" was formed by the relationship of paired opposites—fatherson. mother-daughter, brothersister. “One partner of a family pair transmits his neurotic attitudes to his opposite number,” he reported.

About adult entertainment: In

Manchester, England. Malcolm Patton, a 16-year-old actor who starred in the movie A Kind of Loving, was barred from seeing the film. It was ruled unsuitable for teenagers.