MAILBAG

December 1 1967

MAILBAG

December 1 1967

MAILBAG

Bankruptcy / Babies / and blowup

THANK YOU for How Laurier LaPierre Stays I'amous. If more of our politicians had such humble beginnings, it might make them more concerned about the needs of average Canadians.

ROSS W. MAJOR. CHARLOTTI-TOWN

Governments, take note

In Does It Pay To Go Bankrupt?, the administrator of a welfare fund observes, “Why can’t people see that the cost of these bill-payer loans is greater? No man ever borrowed his way out of debt." What a pity our governments do not take note. It would save us taxpayers a mighty sum. — CECILIA L. HILL, PARKSVILLE, BC

Agony, no — ecstasy, maybe

Re There's a New Way to Have a Baby?": The Childbirth Education Association of Toronto is presently sponsoring classes in psychoprophylaxis. While some women undoubtedly do have an "ecstatic" experience of childbirth. we do not suggest this as our goal. It is our feeling that the "ecstasy" experienced by some is often in direct contrast to the "agony" of a previous experience and grows with the telling. We are much more concerned with avoiding the latter than promoting the FORMER.-SUSAN E. M. PORTER, CHAIRMAN,

THE CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OE' TORONTO

* The ardor of zealots seems to have blinded La Méthode crusaders to all that has gone before. I am afraid Dr. Grantley Dick Read is not even being read properly by PPM proponents, and he is being greatly maligned by their propaganda. 1 have searched every article I’ve read on PPM, and never yet found out just what "new" wrinkle La Méthode introduces. As long as the majority of women clamor to be whisked away on a sterile, painless cloud, to be presented with their pink and blue bundles by godlike physicians, don’t look for any sweeping changes. Climbing a mountain may give you a euphoric sense of accomplishment. Most people still will take the ski lift.

ADRIENNE POLLAK, PORT ELGIN. ONT.

“Everything” isn’t good enough

What a blowup you gave Professor Clare Graves’ shallow analysis of human nature and what constitutes its greatness! His "theory that explains everything" surely carries the self-satisfaction of individualism. the American fetish, to its reductio ad absurdum. Try again. Professor GRAVES!-G. G. HARRIS, RAPID CITY, MAN.

* It cannot be a coincidence that Graves has arrived at seven levels of human existence. I suspect that he is a student of occultism, particularly the theory of reincarnation, and has used this as the background for his rating scale. I trust that all readers who have modestly rated themselves Seven on the scale, are now in "seventh heaven.”

MRS. DOROTHY YEMEN, SHAWVILLE. QUE.

* I wonder how many humans could be neatly slotted into seven categories on the basis of the examples given. Most of us are a hodgepodge. Graves wistfully hopes that, when he has his financial

security solved, he will be able to operate at a Six or Seven level. What an aspiration, to live a life of utter selfishness and noninvolvement. May his theories and formulae perish.

EVELYN HOWE, TORONTO

* 1 beg to differ. The people of Four, Five and Six — if one uses Graves’ definition — are the ones responsible for most of the evils in the world. They are the ones who use every technique possible to extract money from others, then spend this money on themselves. They gratify their senses and leave others impoverished. The highest form of man is not the narrow genius who sits in his room thinking out ridiculous theories. The highest form is the intelligent. strong-minded man who devotes his energies to loving and serving his fellow man. If Graves would combine types Three and Seven with a genuine concern for ones neighbor, that would be the ideal man.

MISS S. HALIBURTON, OTTAWA

* A professor named Graves from U.C.

Pigeon-holed all of humanity;

But somewhere he went wrong.

Because I don't belong —

He’s described everybody but me!

S. E. A. DARLING, BROCKVILLE, ONI.

The vanishing Scots

What an interesting cartoon! Question: How many men do you see? Answer: It depends how you count! Three abreast, by four deep: 12 men. Counting heads: I I men. Counting legs: 14 divided by

two — seven men. Our loyal platoon's casualty list includes the loss of not only one kilt, but may also include one head, and 10 legs. Keep up the good work in the humor department.

C. F. PRONG, BEAUPRÉ, QUE.

Canada’s bigger than both

You head a story about a telephone survey conducted in Montreal and Toronto this way: The Vietnam War: What Canadians Really Think (Reports). What CANADIANS think! Really, now . . . Maclean's may be published in that part of Canada isolated to the east by the Precam brian Shield, but it does have circulation and readers beyond that limited scope. No more of that nonsense and provincialism.

ALLAN SCHROEDER, WINNIPEG

Nanook — of Nova Scotia, too

Northern Development Minister Arthur Laing and his 1964 tour group, inspecting Arctic schools, were “struck by the grotesque anomalies in the textbooks” prescribed for the northern school children ( Why Nanook of the North Still Cant Read. Reports). Would that he continued on page 88

MAILBAG continued

The dog that paints / Laing’s late look / Barbour’s barbs

arid his party visit Nova Scotia for a look at the prescribed grade-one reader! Fskimo children may be unfamiliar with grandfather's farm, but Nova Scotian children arc confronted with a boy in full cowboy regalia, riding "Pony" down a city street and playing cowboy! They also read of a dog painting a garage with his tail and. another time, chasing airplanes at the airport. This reader sup-

posedly presents real situations — situations likely to have happened in sixyear-olds' lives. Absurd! In my six years of leaching. I have presented many different series of readers to first-grade pupils. The present prescribed text in Nova Scotia is the most unreal, uninteresting. unprofessional text yet. Neither teachers nor pupils enjoy it.

MKS. .1 N. I OUlil . HAI It AX

* Until there is a curriculum based upon the needs of the northerners and their culture, until there is adequate supervision und assistance to see that this curriculum is implemented in the most isolated place, until teachers arc adequately prepared before going north (usually they arrive totally unprepared and confused, and. giving up by Christmas time, slide along unsupervised for

the rest of the school year), and until there is co-ordination and recognition of the great work northern teachers do (Ottawa educational bureaucrats shelve good ideas and treat the field staff well if they remain anonymous), then Nanook of the North still won't read!

OK I. AND LARSON, PETITE RIVIÈRE, NS

* Following his 1964 visit to Arctic schools. “Laing ordered some changes made." we are told, "and about a year later he was given to understand these things had been done." It would seem that the least he might have done was to follow the matter closely, and. if necessary. get rid of the obstructionists. Why did he not return to inspect the purported progress earlier? 1 am not reassured by Laing's "state of considerable wrath" in August, nor by the fact that he was appeased by the "encouraging answers" from his department. This style of government is definitely passé for any selfrespecting country of this day and age. J. C. VRANA. ST. BRUNO. QUE.

Don’t trifle with the Queen

I consider your disfigurement of the Queen’s picture appearing on the twodollar bill (In the West $2 Hills Are Funny Money, Reports) an outrage and a direct insult to the Queen.

W. ROSS WHITTON. KEMPTVILLE, ONT.

* A disgrace and completely irrelevant.

JOHN COOKE, VANCOUVER

* Her Majesty has nothing to do with Canadian monetary designs. If your portrait was ornamented with horns and a tail to illustrate something with which you had no connection at all, you would immediately and rightly start a libel action. WALTER MILO. GRANVILLE FERRY, NS

* Two-dollar bills are always in demand at Christmas and are never condemned.

MRS. J. W. HACKETT, PRINCE ALBERT. SASK.

What women are for

In Mailbag, both Mrs. Mary MacMillan, of Ottawa, and Jeanne Sakol. whose Grump article is quoted in part, argue for legalized abortion. But as far as I can see. the only occasion when abortion should be considered is when the fetus is already in proven danger, or when the mother's life is in danger. Women were not put on earth to be "more mature, enjoyable and rewarding partners for men,” as Mrs. MacMillan suggests, but to ensure the continuation of the human race.

MRS. M. W. PRITCHARD. SACKVILLE, NS

’By-’by, Barbour

I must say that the joke by comedian John Barbour (The Comic Who Cuts Up Canadians, Reviews), in which he compares homosexuals to Mounties. is far from amusing. I do not think Barbour is appreciative of his Canadian citizenship, and the sooner he relinquishes it the BETTER.-MRS. J. A. FRENETTE. ST. BRUNO, QUE.

* He can stay in the U.S. as long as they can stand him: we certainly do not want him back in Canada.

MABEL SAUNDERS, OSHAWA. ONT.

* In my opinion, the RCMP is one of the most respected police forces in the world, and allegations of this sort are not only completely unnecessary, they are dangerous in that they could undermine the public’s confidence.

P. T. MCELLIN. MONTREAL if