MAILBAG

“Sabotage” / “Chip on her shoulder”?

March 1 1967

MAILBAG

“Sabotage” / “Chip on her shoulder”?

March 1 1967

MAILBAG

“Sabotage” / “Chip on her shoulder”?

HOORAY FOR June Callwood's School Is For Nancy. She has voiced the feelings of thousands of frustrated parents, who have seen their children, and now their grandchildren, sabotaged over the past 30 years or more. Must we continue in this foggy, unreal system of “mediocracy” with this silly foible that everyone must be a high-school graduate for even a menial task, a PhD for a better position? Is there no way parents and teachers can organize a useful, meaningful education for children? — MRS. R. M. THOMSEN, DAWSON CR UK, HO

For June ('allwood's suggestions, turn to page 30.

* Any relation between our school system and education is purely coincidental, nil R MARR. TORONTO

4c June Callwood will receive the heartfelt gratitude of many parents. She speaks of many students being “crushed, rejected, and embittered." Parents must learn to instill such courage, confidence, and character in them that they will reach their goal, not because of repressive teachers, but in spite of them.

CARR IF: M. H1SII, NI W GLASGOW, NS

The difference

Patrick Douglas’s article asks. Has Whisky Turned The North Sour! (Reports). On the contrary. I feel the north is a land of hearty, adventuresome men and women who are different from the people in southern Canada. Sure they drink more, but they do everything more. —DUSTY HORNBY. YELLOWKNIFE PUBLIC SCHOOL, YELLOWKNIFE, NWT

Replies to a “Stranger”

I have just finished reading Solange Chaput Rolland’s "A Stranger In My Own Land,” and 1 have just one word for her: Nuts. 1 was born and brought up in Quebec; 1 am of French extraction. Mine Chaput Rolland went about English Canada with an oversized chip on her SHOULDER.-SOLANGE JULIEN. OTTAWA

T She shows the great pride, dignity, intelligence and satire so typical of some of our better French-speaking writers. We must regard our solid foundation of French and British culture to be potentially great, but only if we can retain at all times an open mind and learn to put aside our differences. — A. L. CARTER,

SCARBOROUGH. ONT.

4c We get no opportunity to practise speaking French, for nowhere in North America, other than Quebec, is French commonly spoken. If. as she says, the Québécois resent this, we can’t help it. That’s the way it is. Why must Canada be split because of a resentment over which other Canadians have no control? GEORGE DUNSFORD, TORONTO

She and others like her are so preoccupied by selfish interests and hurt pride that (despite all claims to the contrary) they are incapable of perceiving the many more common denominators than differences that exist between French and English Canadians.

E. N. BATE, VANCOUVER

4c I wonder why Mme Chaput Rolland selected “barren-’ as her adjective when describing the University of Western Ontario? It seems to me to be either a careless or slightly malicious choice.

Western has done a great deal in fostering good feeling and fine relations between French Canada and Englishspeaking Canadians. At least 30 years ago Western established a summer school at Trois-Pistoles. Que., to help Englishspeaking Canadians to become bilingual, and soon afterward it began to teach English to French-speaking Canadians. Since then it has taught thousands of

students (French and English) to work and study together in the interests of bilingualism and understanding.

HELEN M. B. ALLISON, HYDE PARK, ONT.

Rights—even for Nazis

I was shocked by a statement made by Peter Lust in his Argument warning

“that Hitler’s ghost still haunts Western Germany.” Says Lust, “We could have won the fight for political sanity if we had — after 1945 — systematically eliminated every teacher with Nazi ideas and background.” As a Jew, he deplores the slaughter of millions of his people by the Nazis, yet he is willing to change roles with Nazis and become the butcher. I sympathize with his concern, but he cannot deny that, if elected, the Nazis have as much right in the government as anyone else.

C. KEEN, TORONTO

Nazi resurgence?/Customers, arise!/Who needs Progress?

* While visiting scientific research establishments in West Germany. 1 spoke at length with several of West Germany’s outstanding scientists on Nazism. 1 got the impression that the majority of present-day German youth is thoroughly affected by Nazi thought. All the Germans I spoke to tried to rationalize Hitlerism as something which greatly benefited Germany at the time, and none

voluntarily voiced any regrets for the genocide practised by the Nazis.

OSWALD N. MORRIS. VICTORIA

T Peter Lust predicts that the Nazis will be back in power in seven years (Argument). 1 don't believe it: it is a far happier Germany than it ever was. Young people don’t have the need to march again, as my generation once

did in 1933. to demonstrate their need for "rights.”

MRS. ERIKA BEGEMANN, KITCHENER, ONT.

T Thanks to Irving Layton for a fabulously valuable article (Two Views Of Germany). Like tens of thousands of other New Canadians of German origin. 1 condone none of the atrocities of World War II, but I feel everybody is

entitled to another chance. It is always the small mind that is unforgiving.

MRS. JOHANNA WENZEL, CALGARY

=k It does not require his Laytonic genius to convince us that the present generation of Germans cannot be held responsible for the crimes of the Nazi regime. Many of us, however, are intelligent enough to realize that millions of Germans still exist who are only too responsible. Many of them hold important positions in the “new” Germany. I agree with Layton’s feelings toward the nice little German children he saw. but I would remind him of the children used for inhuman experiments, in which a special preference was shown for Gypsy children who, along with thousands of other members of my race, were the innocent victims of Germanic Kultur. Not one person was tried by the war crimes commission for the special crime of Romany genocide, and no restitution has been made to the World Romany Community by either Fast or West GERMANY.-RONALD I LE, DIT EGATE GENERAL IN CANADA, WOR1 1) ROMANY COMMUNITY, MONTREAL

Customer backlash

Congratulations to Robert Thomas Allen for declaring. It’s High Time Humiliated, Downtrodden Customers 'Took Those Taeeless, Unpleasant Sales Clerks To Task (Argument). It’s high time the customer struck back.

MRS. E. 1’. WILCOX, GALT, ONT.

5k We had to wait for about an hour for a salesgirl, who was chatting with a colleague. Hurrah for Alien!

MRS. R. WARD. TRAIL, BC

* Pleased to see Allen’s Argument. I had decided that the reason clerks gave me such a hard time was that there was something unpleasant about me. Allen has boosted my morale.

N. FITZPATRICK, GUELPH, ONT.

Four before

In Outstanding Canadians Of 1966, you mentioned that nobody other than Flaine Tanner, of Vancouver, had ever won four gold medals at the Commonwealth Games. Phyllis Dewar, of Moose Jaw. won four gold medals in the Commonwealth Games held in London in 1934. In Unforgettable Canadians, you mentioned that Arthur Albert Irwin, of Toronto, invented the padded baseball glove in 1884. The glove was introduced into baseball in 1875 by Charles C. Waite while pitching for Boston.

HENRY H. ROXBOROUGH, TORONTO

Good-by, Moose Jaw

In Ken Mitchell’s The City With Only Its Name (Reports), we’re told. “The west is booming, but Moose Jaw just sits and watches the trains go by.” Now you’ve done it. Trying to avoid Progress, I thought I had the ideal hiding place in Moose Jaw. But Mitchell has tracked us down. The town is laughing the whole thing off right now, but frankly I’m worried. A few have already taken on the first symptom of Progress—consternation. Others seem distracted. These are the people to watch. Once they switch to martinis, and begin to rise and fall with the stock market, I’m getting out. If Moose Jaw falls, how long will Prince Albert, Yorkton and Swift Current stand? Progress will sweep the province like a pestilence, killing that eccentric spark and healthy lack of interest in Marshall McLuhan we share with Corner Brook, Nfld. The open pores of Saskatchewan will be glossed over with the syrupy veneer that passes for sophistication among the urban afflicted. I?.. ROSS MILLER. MOOSE JAW, SASK.

England: with a glow on—and off/No good-bys for Gordie

Fact is, some have

1 enjoyed Alan Edmonds’ article. England Swings'.' However, neither three weeks nor two months is really long

enough to get the feel of living in the country. Edmonds' picture is no more adequate than would be that of an English visitor who spent two months touring Canada, and wound up with the conclusion that Vancouver is full of alcoholics, drug addicts, rioting football crowds and ugly buildings. Toronto full of ulcer-prone salesmen and white-faced executives, Montreal full of surly, over-

charging French and mad drivers, and that the country is constantly plagued by strikes in all the public services.

DR. D. C. ERASER, MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND, ST. JOHN’S

* Congratulations to Alan Edmonds. After tea at The Connaught or a brandy at intermission in the bar of Her Majesty’s Theatre, one gets a very expen-

sive glow, but it is soon dispelled when one realizes that Brixton, betting shops, and the stubborn council-house mentality are far more representative. The upper classes are beginning to agree that state schools offer equal education, but they still won't admit that all they are paying for now when they send their children away is the accent. Once they admit that. Britain will have a very promising future. - MRS. PAULINE FEDE-

SKI, NEWTON LONGVILLE, ENGLAND

Dutch treat

Re Montreal Style: Why It Swings: We were intrigued by Nicole Deslaurier in her gold-lame jumpsuit and duster, shown, according to the cutline, “on the superstructure of the Belgian Pavilion.” This is exactly the kind of outfit Rotterdam architect Walter Eykelenboom had in mind when designing his swinging . . . Netherlands PAVILION.-J. A. VAN ALPHEN, ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER GENERAL, NETHERLANDS PAVILION/EXPO 67, MONTREAL

Where there’s smoke

Re A Surprising Second Look At Those ‘'Facts' About Cancer And Smoking, by C. Harcourt Kitchin: If nine renowned medical authorities — including the U.S. Surgeon-General—are certain that smoking causes cancer, and one quackpot says it is not necessarily so, those who continue to smoke will embrace the one. not the nine.

R. E. REYNOLDS, VANCOUVER

* Most authorities are more concerned about its effect on coronary disease, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. It seems ridiculous to consider the opinions of the Canadian, American, and British Medical Associations as being unimportant.

DR. F. D. BARAGAR, WINNIPEG

* Kitchin points to the large quantities of harmful benzpyrene in the air as compared with the small quantities found in tobacco smoke. Yet where on earth can you find a greater concentration of smoke than in the lungs after a good drag on a fag?

J. E. GRIFFITHS, EDMONTON

Inferiority complex

Gordon Sinclair’s Mailbag letter casting doubts on the Canadianism of hockey’s Gordie Howe is a perfect example of how Canada’s national inferiority complex works. If a Canadian so much as sets foot in the U.S., he is judged immediately to have ceased to be Canadian, because we feel our national identity to be so weak that it succumbs at once to a stronger culture.

D. SCRIMSHAW, MONTREAL

T It is encouraging to think that being a Canadian doesn’t depend on the opinion of an egotistical old bore.

D. G. STUART, PORT HOPE, ONI.

T Howe has remained a Canadian; he has not taken out American citizenship PAPERS.-JOAN DUNN, SASKATOON, SASK.

Stopper

You report on a new electric shock treatment, behavior therapy, used to help over-eaters, alcoholics and sex deviates (They Learn To “Cure” Themselves With Shock). Great idea, but is it so new? For 40 years farmers have been using the electric fence to confine hogs.

MRS. R. J. HOWE. REGINA if