MAILBAG

Life with a tiger / Make us honest!

May 1 1967

MAILBAG

Life with a tiger / Make us honest!

May 1 1967

MAILBAG

Life with a tiger / Make us honest!

I FULLY AGREE with Blair Fraser’s The Chinese Civil War That Never Was? (Reports). Don’t believe everything you read in the papers. I have seen Russian Communism in action. Communism, Russian or Chinese brand, is built with guns, bayonets, chains and blood and stands on terror, hate, propaganda and lies. Russian Communists built a “New Soviet Man.’’ fully indoctrinated and brainwashed to serve the purpose of Communism, while eliminating all their opponents. The Chinese are doing the same thing today, leaders in Russia have changed, but not their ideology. Leaders will be changed also in China, but Communism will remain. All because of Western ignorance. An old Chinese proverb says, “Co-operation with a tiger is only possible inside the tiger.”

V. RANDMAA, KIRKLAND LAKE, ONT,

The Pill

“Refreshingly different" describes Douglas Marshall's The Surprising Social Revolution We’ve Started With The Pill. The astounding thing is that all this revolutionary family planning is still against the law in Canada. Section 150 of the Criminal Code brands any kind of birth-control advice as an offense tending to corrupt morals. When is parliament going to repeal this law, and make an honest woman out of Canada?

MRS. BARBARA CADBURY, TORONTO

5k Geneticists have used hormones to induce changes in heredity. They observe at least two generations before forming conclusions. The Pill should be similarly tested before being pronounced safe. Historians of the future may record I960 as the start of the Pill Plague, when women inflicted many and diverse genetic defects on their grandchildren. Why? They thought that they should be free to indulge their sexual drive whenever their hormones moved them.

IRENE B. MILLS, KAMLOOPS, BC

5k I predict that in a century or so, our society will be flourishing with mobs of educated women whose bodies and souls will have lost all dignity through the constant use of the Pill. They will have become so aggressive, so independent and so selfish that men will be terrified of them. The words “womanliness,” “tenderness” and “self-discipline” will have disappeared. The Pill is making women into things and toys. How can a thing or a toy reach the quintessence of womanhood?

MRS. CLAIRE CAMPBELL, MONTREAL

“The old whammie”

Thank you for June Andersen’s fine article on Yvonne Anteile, the author of How To Catch And Hold A Man (February Reviews). I think the reason we teenagers like her so much is that she takes our problems seriously. In my book, she is No. 2 (next to the Monkees, of COURSE).-LYNN BELL, TORONTO

=k The reason teenagers like Miss Anteile is because her tricks really work. They teach us how to act like ladies instead of like bums.

RUTH MICHAEL, RICHMOND HILL, ONT.

5k Say, why doesn’t somebody send Miss Anteile to Quebec? Maybe some of her sympathique would make some of those separatists forget about politics!

GEORGE DAGG, AGINCOURT, ONT.

>k Men react to her methods as though somebody put the “old whammie” on them. But I do not share my friends’ admiration for her. All 1 can say is that you adults have created a pretty sick society for us to go into. Unfortunately, my fellow teenagers appear to be quite willing to carry on your tradition of phoniness.

SUZANNE DELI, TORONTO

UC2?

In Roy Peterson’s Peterson On The Prowl (Reports), we are shown a sketch of an American dollar bill and a Canadian dollar bill. On each is a serial number. Do I detect a Peterson joke, and have I decoded it properly? On the Canadian bill: T42-24T00 (Tea for two — two for two); on the American: 0071CU2 (007, I see you, too). — B. BARTON, VANCOUVER

You do, and yon have.

Free speech and Mr. Lewis

1 hope David Lewis, deputy leader of the New Democratic Party, takes to heart your Editorial, Tell Us, Mr. Lewis: What's A Democracy For?, in which you say in part: “It was a mistake, he argued to apply the principle of free speech to a spokesman for neo-Nazism,” adding, "People who resented [the CBC interview with Adolf von Thadden] should be demanding to hear more, not less, from and about von Thadden.” I hope Lewis realizes how many votes his party will lose by his irrational, hateful speech. I for one will not vote for his party any more unless the NDP shows through actions that they are against any kind of expression of hate against any group of human beings.

VILMA EICHHOLZ, CLARKSON, ONT.

5k The best thing in your January issue was David Lewis’s "We Are An Echo Of Washington.” Here where 1 am working, in Lesotho (formerly Basutoland), there is a situation similar in some respects to that Canada finds itself in in regard to the U.S. A small, desperately poor country has the choice between selling out to wealthy South Africa and so sacrificing the independence she has just received, or remaining proudly free but subject to an increasing degree of poverty. Canada has no such drastic choice, but we Canadians should prefer to drop down to fifth or sixth in the list of most-prosperous nations and to call a halt to our rising standard of living in order to preserve our independence and to play an independent role in world affairs.

G. M. HALIBURTON, LESOTHO

Pith and pother

In The Caribbean: Our Sunny New Frontier, a photo caption begins, “Pith helmets once symbolized white supremacy . . .” Rubbish. White people wore, and wear, helmets to protect their craniums from the sun. Actually, “pith helmet” is a misnomer when applied to the military helmet. A pith helmet is strictly a civilian article, made of a pith and much thicker than the army helmet, made largely of cork. The white-supremacy angle has been overplayed by misinformed writers. - G. F. LAYNE, SUTTON, QUE.

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Caribbean: partnership, not charity / “Sheer provincialism”

>k You just made a home run — Nicholas Steed’s The Pleasures Of Paradise was it. — H. E. FULLER, WINNIPEG

* We really should help these people, even if it means taking them into union with Canada. But do you think French Canadians would like to have so many more English-speaking people joining

US?—I). MARSHALL, SCARBOROUGH, ONT.

* Superficial articles . . . That high rate of literacy didn’t just happen. Five generations of business, government and church leadership left a legacy more significant than Harry’s Nitery. Nowhere do we read of the splendid University of the West Indies whose campus spreads from Jamaica to Trinidad, of the community-development programs, the sugarworkers’ welfare and self-help housing programs, the scores of colleges and hundreds of schools. This too is the Caribbean and looks not for condescending and patronizing charity, but a vital and viable partnership based on mutual understanding and RESPECT.-REV. LAWRENCE A. PURDY, PORT CREDIT, ONT.

* We do not owe the Negro a place in our society. We are under no obligation to the Jamaican immigrant. Granted, there must continue a sense of tolerance. ANGUS G. CLARRY, TORONTO

No offense — comedy

Solange Chaput Rolland's “A Stranger hi My Own Land” didn’t offend, wound or sadden me. 1 found it a mixture of terribly boring clichés and hilarious comedy. What could be more boring than the whining tone and ehip-on-theshoulder attitude, both of which are wearing very THIN?-E. TAYLOR. OTTAWA

ík She. like many of her friends, demands the right to live her life as she pleases, but denies others the same privilege. Since she is not likely to be able to replace Canadians outside of her beloved province with her stereotyped, test-tube, mail-order brainchild, she will have to learn to live with us, or be an outsider. People, for some reason, insist upon being themselves, which I think is a great idea.—,i. LOEWEN, WINNIPEG

=k If these people do not leave Confederation soon, the English will find a way of emancipating themselves from this race. — JAMES WAIT, GALT, ONT.

* She says, “This kind of international bilingualism has no Canadian reality,” referring to Toronto’s France-oriented French School. Here we have the crux of the matter. Such an attitude is not one of cultural progressiveness, nor pride of race and language, nor even selfpreservation. It is sheer provincialism, which I suspect the rest of Canada has now, however reluctantly, foresworn.

A. GORDON WICKENS, BEAR POINT, NS

* After reading the article, I now see Quebec as being a province of pampered paranoids.

MRS, FAYE EDEN, PRINCE GEORGE, BC

4? So much hogwash, written by a typically biased Canadian of French extraction.— M. G. BELCHER, GREENWOOD, NS

It ain’t easy, baby

Re Jeannine Locke’s Health Is Beauty, Baby: Health is work, baby. It is gutpulling, leg-dislocating, bone-scrunching work. Boring work, too, by the time you do 50 or more sit-ups, side-bends and hip-rolls. Beauty is out of the question for most of us. But, yes, I do feel fairly fit!—MRS. W. MUIR, ISLINGTON, ONT.

Death of Christ

In A Scientist's Post-Mortem On The Crucifixion (Reports), Derek Cassels says, “For nearly 2,000 years Christians have believed that Christ died of exhaustion on the cross of Calvary.” This is what Christians never believed. Matthew 27, 45-56 describes the passing of Jesus Christ. Twice that section mentions the strength of His voice. And finally: “But Jesus gave one more great cry, and died.” The last sounds of a man who dies of exhaustion would be a whisper or a whimper, not “a great cry.” Jesus said, “No man taketh it [my life] from me, but I lay it down myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again.”

F. A. MILLER, MAPLE CREEK, SASK.

=k What Dr. Jacques Bréhant has to say, as reported by Cassels, had already been said by Jim Bishop in his book, The Day Christ Died, which was published in 1957. Said Bishop: “The cause of death, in Roman crucifixions, was never loss of blood. It was almost always asphyxiation.” The details provided by Bréhant — about the breaking of the legs of those being crucified, the portion of the cross carried by Christ, where the nails were driven in — all were given by Bishop. Has Bréhant discovered anything new?

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After Bishop, what’s Bréhant got? / Why wait for tragedy?

MRS. J. DALTON, GUELPH, ONT.

* The details of Christ’s crucifixion were reported in a book, A Doctor At Calvary, by Pierre Barbet, MD, 17 years ago. Also, it is misleading to label an artistic conception as “tradition.” - REV. F. J. POWER. SJ, EDITOR, CANADIAN MESSENGER, TORONTO

George Sinclair replies

You owe a round of apologies for misleading and offensive journalism in your April issue (These Gays Are Trying To Sell Yon Something, by Jack Batten). First, you owe an apology to the members of the Special Joint Committee on Consumer Credit (Prices) for describing them as “these rubes” and as “carping nit-pickers” — name-calling for which there is no justification whatsoever. Secondly, you owe a personal apology to one member of that Committee. Mr. W. Warren Allmand, MP, for sneering at him with “oh Lord — this Warren Allmand,” “Allmand smirks,” and attributing to him “silly nit-picking.” Your third apology is due to me for interjecting all your attacks among quotations from the Hansard report of my testimony before the Special Joint Committee. It is impossible for any reader not to believe that your attacks upon the Committee are. in fact, mine. This is utter misrepresentation. For the record, Mr. Batten had one brief interview with me, during which there was no mention of the Joint Committee whatsoever. The criticisms of the Committee are entirely his and yours. —

G. G. SINCLAIR, PRESIDENT, MACLAREN ADVERTISING CO., LIMITED, TORONTO

Jack Batten's article (in oar opinion a first-rate piece of journalism) examined the role of the modern advertising man hy describing the operations and the people of Canada’s biggest advertising agency. In the itassage referred to by Mr. Sinclair, statements attributed to him were taken from the Hansard record and were placed in quotation marks. Statements not in quotation marks were, of course, those of the writer.

A terrible price

Re The Lonely Death Of Charlie Wenjack: What a terrible price the poor child paid for a bit of education! The needs of our Indians have been ignored far, far too long. What are the federal, provincial and municipal governments waiting for — more child tragedies? MRS. NORMA HIGGINS, NIAGARA FALLS, ONT.

* This is only one of 10,000 similar stories which could be told about Indian people right now. Indian lands arc being stolen from Indian people every day. The attempts to move Indian people ahead have failed because the communitydevelopment officers are useless when they come under the religious head of the reserve, who is always a white man; if the development officer does not follow the orders of the religious, then his character is ruined and he is fired. The long string of failures of ministers of Indians in the government has been a black mark and a tragedy. One was worse than the other. Now we have a man who seems capable, Arthur Laing, but he seems to find his hands tied, his wishes being blocked by political and religious considerations from outside, and by the basic hostility against Indian people by the “bilingual” employees of his department! — KAHN-TJNETA HORN,

CAUCHNAWAGA INDIAN LAND (QUEBEC)

T I cried. To take young children and send them many miles to an alien environment is horribly cruel.

MRS. L. RITCHIE, NIAGARA FALLS, ONT.

T The school is anything but “bleak” and “institutional.” A large red-brick building, it faces on Round Lake. The students have large lawns, play areas and an outdoor rink. Integration into the local school system allows these children to learn and develop on an equal footing with “whites.” They are hardly cut off from their families; even in Charlie’s case, three of his sisters were also living there. Why did Charlie Wenjack die? Because the white man made an attempt to provide him with an education which would enable him to earn a decent living and to provide himself and his future children with some of the better things in life, which would enable him to pass on his culture with dignity— not a culture of drunkenness and semistarvation? Or did Charlie die because adult members of his own race let him set out for a destination 400 miles away with only matches in his pocket?

MRS. R. J. MORION, KENORA, ONT.

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Who’s crying now?

/ $15 makes $100

Logic?

in commenting on the proposed removal of the Canadian coat-of-arms from Post Office equipment (Is This The Winter Of Our Discontent?, Reports) Alan Edmonds states: “But 15 years ago a

similar proposal . . . created the sort of public outcry that can only be mounted by pressure groups dedicated to preserving our ossified divorce laws, to banning booze, opposing corporal punishment — and to retaining the Union Jack as the national flag.” Edmonds is employing the classic technique of the smear. Applying Edmonds’ logic and concern for truth, one can conclude that those in favor of removing the Canadian coat-of-arms are all divorcees, alcoholics, convicted murderers and frenzied anarchists.

JOHN M. MONK, OTTAWA

Bet to win

As a systems writer and racing speculator, I’m inclined to believe the method used by Mike Kolton would be slow poison to most bettors (If You Can’t Beat The Horses, Why Is Mike Kolton So Rich?). Risking $100 to gain $15 —although perhaps a nice profit in other forms of investment — is not what I would recommend to most horse bettors. Far better, I think, is for the bettor to go for a price and invest $15 to make $100. This can be accomplished with one win payoff of seven to one or more. I suggest bettors adopt a few sound principles of handicapping, then refuse to invest on any horse at under, let’s say, four to one. And bet to win only! — D. A. DAVY, NEW WESTMINSTER, BC

Operation feather ruffle

Oakley R. Fanning, of Buffalo, NY, says Uncle Sam is “fighting for Canada’s interests” (Mailbag). I am one Canadian who is tired of hearing how wonderful Uncle Sam is, and I think Canadians should ruffle the Eagle’s feathers more often. - MRS. E. BEACH, ANCASTER, ONT.

Out the window?

I protest vigorously the content of the controversial TV program Sunday (Nov. 27). I protest vigorously the TV program Nightcap, described in Maclean’s by Sandra Peredo. I likewise protest all other destructive TV programs to which youth

today are so frequently exposed. I protest vehemently the publication in Maclean’s (recommended reading in Canadian school libraries) of author Nicholas Monsarrat’s distorted views on sex, teenagers and divorce. Are our spiritual values slipping out the window? - CLIFFORD E. EDWARDS, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS FOR ANNAPOLIS COUNTY AND DISTRICT OF DIGBY, BRIDGETOWN, NS

Don’t miss “magika”

Greatly enjoyed Alexander Ross’s article on the Czech effort at Expo (How To Sell A Little Country Big!). I have been twice to Prague and heartily recommend it to tourists. But Ross dismisses in one sentence Joseph Svoboda’s invention, laterna magika. I’ve seen it and was enormously impressed; the mixture of live actors with filmed material was simply stupendous. I would advise all visitors to Expo not to miss it. If you're going to Europe, see it in Prague.

F. M. CAVILLER, TORONTO

Who is Nancy?

Re School Is For Nancy, by June Callwood: I am a former “Nancy,” now in the third year of university. High school taught me this: get those marks, or no one will give a damn about you. You drive yourself to the verge of a nervous breakdown, you get those marks—and then you discover that no one gives a damn about you anyway. Your achievement is a laurel for the school.

RUTH NICHOLS, VANCOUVER

5k Miss Callwood is wasting her time. Most of your readers are the parents of Nancys and quite satisfied with the plodding progress of their progeny.

MRS. LINDA GAUTHIER, TORONTO

In a word

Hooray for Michael Field and his new cookbook, Michael Field's Cooking School, as described in The Food Lover’s Library. “Gourmet cooking” is a misnomer and the misuse of a French word: first, because a gourmet is a person, and second, because many things termed gourmet cooking are applied to food which in the most lenient sense could only be called bourgeois cooking. The throwing of a glass of wine into a stew does not move it into the realms of haute CUISINE.-MRS. MARY BULLOCK,

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND ★