MAILBAG

MAILBAG

Mystery of Vancouver / Canada duped?

September 1 1967
MAILBAG

MAILBAG

Mystery of Vancouver / Canada duped?

September 1 1967

MAILBAG

Mystery of Vancouver / Canada duped?

CONGRATS to Jack Batten. Vancouver — Its Message Is: Live! has to be one of the funniest articles I have ever read, and yet through all the outrageous humor and mirth one could still sense that vital, probing, mysterious and perplexing question: Why doesn’t everybody live in Vancouver? A good question and when I thought about it I saw that aside from the smog, the rain, the slums, the rain, the crime, the rain, the bush-league atmosphere. the rain, the drug addicts, the rain, etc., the only reason 1 don’t live in Vancouver is because I have a small aversion to the conceitedness of les bons vivants, and really, if one considers it, that is such a small thing. So again, mes félicitations to Batten, and 1 hope he has opened up other Canadian eyes as he has opened mine. — JOHN H. LAURENCE,

PRESIDENT, IDLE GENIUS CLUB, CALGARY

T In Its Message Is: Live!, Jack Batten says, in describing the Vancouver way of living: “No one in the office after four if the bay is calm and the boat’s refrigerator is heavy with a little lager.” Maybe the guys aren’t in the office after four, but the gals sure are — to five and five-thirty. Besides, they don’t make enough money to buy boats.

ELLEN RANDE LES, NORTH VANCOUVER

Don’t fumble the torch

To me. the punch line in Return to a Killing (¡round — 25 Years After

Dieppe is Major Brian McCool's comment: "It doesn’t matter whether [the Dieppe raid| had any point or whether it was badly planned . . . What is important is that a lot of good men believed in something enough to die for it, and you can’t belittle that and you shouldn’t try to.” Few others have made the point. Unless it is made again and again, all our “Remembrances” are not so much honoring our dead as making mock of them — we merely prove that we have not caught the torch that they counted on us to carry forward.

K. E. EDGAR, VANCOUVER

Eaton’s, where are you?

I would like to add yet another to the list of Eaton’s collapsed building plans, which were catalogued by Sheila H. Kieran (An Eaton’s Catalogue of Promised Dream Towers, Reports). In the late 1920s Eaton's planned a department store in downtown Windsor, Ont. They even persuaded the city to expropriate land and open up a new street for them so that their store could be located on a corner. The "new" street is still there but Eaton’s is not.

J. C. SINCLAIR, MARKHAM, ONE.

The miners: a Canadian problem

I compliment you on The Forgotten Miners, by Ian Adams, about the miners who are dying like flies as a result of radiation exposure at St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. I sincerely hope that you will not let this matter drop. Victor K. Nelson, formerly of Saskatoon, Sask., now living in Denmark, spent 37 years in Canada. He worked 27 of those years in the mines. He tried, unsuccessfully, to secure a pension for disablement from silicosis, but was statute-barred by all provinces and territories in which he

worked. In 1963 he returned to Denmark. On arrival he received a pension of 50 percent and in May 1965 he received the full disability pension. He had not been in Denmark for 37 years! The miners of Canada are itinerant workers generally; they go where the work is, and yet, because they move too much from province to province, they find themselves at the end of their useful lives denied any consideration for their disabilities. It is high time the workmen's compensation, especially as it relates to silicosis, radiation effects and Raynaud’s phenomenon, be removed entirely from provincial jurisdiction and made Dominion-wide, under federal jurisdiction.

E. L. WALKER, COMPENSATION OFFICER, WESTERN DISTRICT, INTERNATIONAL UNION OF MINE, MILL & SMELTER WORKERS, VANCOUVER

Somebody likes you archy

Re toujours gai archy your day has come (Reports): I am glad to see that, at last, some use has been found for the cockroach. I don’t believe I have ever actually seen one. but I have a profound sympathy for the poor unloved creature for many years, as expressed in my poem The Cockroach. Bless the biology students of Okotoks High School for their Centennial PROJECT.--MRS. T. F. WRIGHT.

ST. MICHAEL’S RECTORY, CANMORE, ALTA.

Don’t brush off the Arabs

Re your Editorial, 1 Vital Aqaba Means to Us and Us to Aqaba: It will be to the everlasting shame of all nations if they brush the Arab contentions into the waters of Aqaba. The people of all countries concerned should be polled on what they expect their respective governments to do. For too long Zionism has been creeping ahead by urging snap decisions be taken in the assemblies of many countries. If Israel is allowed to carry on in the present belligerent character, there will be no benefit for the other peoples of the world, and only shame and remorse can follow.

D. D. FRASER, PRINCE GEORGE, BC

T Your Editorial would appear to be transparently sanctimonious. The practical result of the Pearson policy during the Suez, crises was to supplement the efforts of the strange alliance of Dictator Khrushchov and McCarthyite John Foster Dulles -—e.g., saving the Nasser dictatorship in Egypt and halting the attempt to internationalize the Suez Canal. The only purpose of the Canadian presence in the Sinai, according to Nasser, was to permit him to rearm his forces for the purpose of annihilating Israel. The Canadian troops played ny. peace-keeping role whatsoever, but wefe the dupes of the Nasser dictatorship.

NATHAN GANS, MONTREAL

Greene with envy?

Jon Ruddy, author of your recent article on Lome Greene, appears to have been born with a plastic spoon in his mouth, like most of the rest of us. However, it was not necessary to be so blatantly envious of Greene. Greene is now in a financial position, through his own hard work, to afford a swimming pool and the house and grounds to go with it. Certainly, Bonanza and Greene are not on an artistic par with the Old Vic and Olivier, but the Cartwrights provide entertainment for a huge number of people. Ruddy did not do Greene justice, and his petty attitude suggests that his plastic spoon has dissolved in his tears of envy, leaving nothing in his mouth but his foot.-JOHN BARCLAY, OROMOCTO, NB

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MAILBAG continued from page 8

Canadian publishing

I was very interested in Douglas Marshall’s piece on the Canadian publishing industry. The Rapid $50 Advance of Canadian Publishing (Reviews). However. a few corrections and comments are in order. The title of Morton Shulman’s book isn't How To Make a Million; it's Anyone Can Make a Million. It isn't Longmans Green: it's Longmans Canada Limited. Jack McClelland’s Preview Book Society isn't projected; it’s already in operation and has been for several months, successfully I am told. Marshall says that “only sensational bestsellers can recover production costs on the Canadian market alone.” This may have been true at one time, but certainly shouldn't be today. Our own little publishing house, only two years old, has recovered production costs and paid full royalties on each of the eight books we have published so far.

IM 7 I K MARTIN. PRESIDENT, PETER MARTIN ASSOCIA I I S L I D.. TORONTO

Bourgault and separatism

In Is This Man Already the Most Dangerous Politician in Canada2, separatist-party chief Pierre Bourgault is quoted as saying that women “call me at night and say, ‘1 want to go to bed with you.’” All I can say is the males must be an ugly-looking bunch down there in Quebec. It surely isn't his looks that attract them.

IRENE SMITH, VANCOUVER

Not so many years ago one traveled in Quebec and lived there as one did anywhere in Canada. Today this is no longer true. Who even dares to invest in Quebec? It is all because of this separatist spirit, which receives all the press attention it could ever have hoped for. T. SMITH, TORONTO

T Hurray for M. Bourgault. At last a separatist has admitted they are adolescent exhibitionists. The country is trying to grow — why must they drag it down for their insular, senseless little “cause”? In other words, why don’t they grow up? - A. M. OBRIEN. HALIFAX

Unwanted inheritance

“The youngsters of today,” writes A. I. Crawford, of Montreal (Mailbag), “are better off than young people of any generation since history began.” This is only partially true. We have more luxuries than ever before — but from our parents we will inherit atomic bombs, nuclear weapons, germ warfare and genocide. We didn’t ask for things. Our parents created them. Some of us are bad-mannered, most of us are not. We rebel; some of us go off the deep end. We are an ungrateful generation. But who wants nuclear warfare, bombs, segregation. and all that? We don't.

KATHIE WATERHOUSE, RENFREW, ONT.

* Some adults have created a very sick society for us. Modern art could never have got started had not adults liked it first. And the music — adults own the recording companies. Adults made this situation. Now it has backfired on them. We like the situation now. bad as it may be. and as long as we are all not blown up we will fight you capitalistic old phonies to the end to keep our position.

MARTIN I. BOWERING, BRANTFORD. ONT.

* I go along with Mr. Crawford. Could anything be more phony than the screaming and yelling by teenagers over some unkempt, long-haired yowlers strumming guitars? They behave like demented halfwits instead of civilized human beings. More to the point is their terrible ignorance on most vital matters: especially the teenage girls. They give the impression they know all about sex. But the reports keep coming about the thousands of unmarried mothers.

GEORGE SALVERSON, SR.. TORONTO

Don’t count MacEachen out

In Party Puzzle: Follow Wliat Leader'.'. Blair Fraser curtly dismisses Alan MacEachen as a potential Liberal leadership candidate. MacEachen is academically in the forefront of his cabinet colleagues. He is acknowledged as the foremost debater in the Commons. His wide comprehension of the intricacies of parliamentary rules and his good rapport with the Opposition are acknowledged by all members of the House. Geographically, one can assume that the majority of delegates from PEI, NS, NB and probably Newfoundland will be supporters of their "native son" at any leadership convention. - GAYLE GIBSON. MANOTICK, ONT.

Step forward to peace

A loud hear-hear! to Major McKenzie Porter's timely Argument. Why Stop at Unification'.' Here's Our Chance to Build the World's Biggest Cominando Force. We can only hope the appropriate powers will take heed. It could be a step forward to establishment of a world peacekeeping force and world government by a real United Nations.

JANE Y. SHERMAN, ROBERT 1. SHERMAN. CHURCHILL. MAN.

You can’t beat Saint John

I enjoyed The Boating Bit. but I was disappointed that nothing was said about Saint John, NB. We have waterways unequalled anywhere else in Canada. I am a member of the Royal Kennebecasis Yacht Club, the second oldest royal club in Canada. We enjoy over 250 miles of navigational water on the Saint John River and the Kennebecasis River, which join at Saint John.

JEAN-LOUIS LEMOINE, SAINT JOHN WEST

Nongrading for a graded world?

Re June Callwood’s rather sweeping castigation of the present-day educational structure, in High Schools: Holdouts in the Classroom Revolution: If the present projection of education is to emphasize nongrading or streaming, in what way does this prepare the student for a definitely graded adult world in which he has to compete? If exams are not compulsory, where does the student learn to handle crises, or summon that extra aliquot of energy which will often be the fine difference between success and failure in the world?

NEIL COLVIN, FORT SASKATCHEWAN, ALTA.

From the Continent, a husband

Re The Unchaperoned Girl's Guide to Europe: It's interesting to know that the Grand Tour. job-in-London year, as described by Bonnie Buxton, is, even in 1967, hardly more exhilaratingly beset with hazards for the properly brought up Canadian girl than it was in the Dim Ages of 17 years ago. (More affluent, however. I earned five pounds a week in a respectable publishing house, and crumbling London rooms already cost four guineas.) The ideal solution to the parent problem is to bring home a Continental-born husband, who. nevertheless, turns out all right in the end. - SIRS. HERMAN G. VAN DER TAK. WASHINGTON. DC

* My main impression of Europe is that I did not meet Miss Buxton there.

.11 RM A IN CU1LLERIER, TORONTO

Good show, Canada

On the occasion of the centenary of Canada, I would like to express my congratulations and admiration for your nation's progress and the magnitude and diversification of its development. By general consensus Australians feel that Canada’s future is assured and knows no bounds or limitations. Grasp it and fulfill it — we have every confidence in you.

ALLAN ELLIOTT. NOWRA. NEW SOUTH WALES. AUSTRALIA

Hot Scotch

In Reports you refer to new electric golf greens at the Banff Springs Hotel golf course, and suggest that the same technique might be used to create all-weather football fields. There is such a field in Scotland. The Scottish Rugby Union installed an "electric blanket" at their Murrayfield International Ground, Edinburgh, in 1959. It has proved very successful. The same idea is used to keep bad hills free of ice in winter.

DAVID KID. ABERDOUR. SCOTLAND it