MAILBAG

Lightfoot: genius/New Left: speechless

November 1 1968

MAILBAG

Lightfoot: genius/New Left: speechless

November 1 1968

MAILBAG

Lightfoot: genius/New Left: speechless

I CONGRATULATE Marjorie Harris on her fine article on composer-singer Gordon Lightfoot. For once, a writer has given us an insight into the soul behind the guitar, and the genius of Lightfoot, rather than a criticism of his arrogance or bad manners. An article such as hers was a joy to read, as 1 m sure all Lightfoot fans will agree.

JULIE MALONEY, OTTAWA

From the New Left, silence

Your outstanding Editorial. A Strange, Inexplicable Silence From The New Left, should be reprinted in every newspaper in North America and Europe. Their response to the recent events in Biafia and Czechoslovakia reveals to the world that the New Left’s convictions and motivation are not only shallow but somethin^ less than altruistic. The onl\ thing more inexplicable and dangerous than the silence from the New Left is the deafening silence from the average God-fearing, tax-paying citizen caught up in a vacuum of indifference and apathy. It will indeed be a sorry day for democracy when its citizens lose the ability or desire to articulate their concern about the world and its problems.

R. J. FENLON, PORT ARTHUR. ONT.

* The silence of the New Left is neither strange nor inexplicable: they had no reason for taking to the streets for mass protests. This affair is strictly a Rightwing flap and if any mass protests should have taken place, they should have been organized and mounted by the Rightwing-hawk elements who were pleased at this opportunity for anti-Russian propaganda. Czech officials had asked their citizens at home, and their friends abroad, not to demonstrate or resist: it was an internal dispute, to be settled internally between two Communist countries. Anyone who disturbs the status quo in Europe is doing so at the risk of starting a nuclear war. The New Left is certainly not going to hold mass rallies and parades in favor of a nuclear war!

J. E. MCKINNEY. VANCOUVER

* The Editorial read loud and clear. I’m with you, man. Cheers!

J. KENT SIMPSON, VICTORIA

Love affair

Re Maclean’s Interviews Nathan Cohen: Early he sent a Cupid’s dart Piercing one breast, his own;

So, evermore, he must impart Cohen's romance with Cohen!

MARY AKSIM. CARP, ONT.

No-knock network

In her article, The Gloves Are Off In The Ad Game . . . (Reports), Pat Annesley writes: “The CBC has a firm rule against derogatory statements in advertising, and it tends to interpret this rule very broadly. Just how broadly was best demonstrated the time CBC’s commercial-acceptance office refused to carry a Volkswagen commercial which knocked (are you ready?) Volkswagen." It is true we have firm rules against derogatory advertising. It is possible that, in applying these policies, we would turn down a commercial which knocked the product being advertised or another product of the advertiser. It is possible, but to my knowledge has never happened. It certainly did not happen with the Volks-

wagen commercial referred to in Mrs. Annesley’s article. While it would be indiscreet to discuss this commercial in detail, 1 can assure you that it made what were in our opinion derogatory allusions to competitive automobiles, not Volkswagens, and that anyone who took any other meaning out of the remarks we made on the script completely mis-

understood OUT point. — B. C. DONNELLY. ASSISTANT SUPERVISOR. COMMERCIAL ACCEPTANCE. CRC, TORONTO

Who’s downgrading women?

I agree with Sheila H. Kieran that the investigation into the status of women in

Canada is rather a silly performance as well as a useless expense (Who's Downgrading Women? Women). Mrs. Kieran missed one of the women elected to parliament: 1 am sure she could have found little fault with Agnes MacPhail, who had no easy row to hoe as the first woman in the parliament of men. We older women do not like to see her forgotten, for she was an outstanding pioneer in the rights of women.

PAMELA H. HURLBURT, VERNON. RC

* Sheila Kieran is unfair to women. The

them nothing.

LILLA M. HARRIS, TRURO, NS * I will not deny that women must accept responsibility for their own lives, roles and aspirations. But at the same time let’s not lose sight of the social pressures that damn women if they opt for a career and damn them if they choose to remain at home. Sooner or later we must come to grips with prob-

lems like the back-room abortionist, the

battered-baby syndrome, broken marriages and emotionally disturbed children. This we cannot do till we realize that we have in our midst people, many of whom are women, living in a kind of quiet desperation of anxiety and frustration, whose roots they cannot even identify. Who’s downgrading women? Sheila Kieran! — MRS. CAROLYN E. SMITH, HAMILTON, ONT. * I was most shocked by the implication that not only do women share the misfortune of other minority groups (which they do), but also that discrimination doesn’t matter because women are whiny and lazy and don’t pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. This is precisely BY THEIR OWN BOOTSTRAPS.

which is largely responsible for the mess

the United States is in today. When I move to Canada in the fall, I hope to find very few people who think like Mrs. Kieran, and a lot more who realize that the women’s liberation movement is one of the most crucial civil-rights issues of our time. — MRS. PATRICIA DEWDNEY, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Okay, planes fly — but how? Having spent much time perusing the books on aerodynamics (The Secret World of Jack Havey, Scientist), I would agree that they substantiate his claim that the lifting force of an airplane is the vacuum created on the upper surface of its wing. UPPER SURFACE OF

a liquid column supported above by a

vacuum indicate that the height to which

this column rises is dependent on having the vacuum above, but is varied by changes in external pressure, supporting in part David MacRae’s opinion (Mailbag) that pressure under the wing is the sustaining force. 1 believe that both opinions are correct, but only in part. In my view, the laminar flow of air over an airfoil is affected by the configuration of both the upper and lower surfaces. The lift force is supplied by the vacuum created on the upper surface in combination with the pressure exerted on the lower surface. GEORGE S. BADAME, TORONTO :k The ultimate force that holds up the aircraft is. paradoxically, the earth’s gravity, acting on the atmosphere. ALBERT TROOST, BOUCHERVILLE, QUE. 5k The lifting force produced by a wing is derived from the pressure difference between the upper and lower surfaces acting on the area of the wing. To speak

of the lift being produced by either the

low-pressure region at the upper surface, as Havey maintains, or the high pressure region at the lower surface, as MacRae

claims, is sheer nonsense. The important

thing, I reiterate, is the pressure difference, which depends on both. H. JANZEN, CHIEF FLYING INSTRUCTOR, RIDEAU GLIDING CLUB, KINGSTON, ONT. * A vacuum can do nothing as a vacuum is a void. It is the pressure below the wing — or as it is called, the displacement — that lifts the airplane. When you pull out a piston in a pump

you produce a vacuum, but it is the air pressure on the other side of the piston

that must be pushed against to produce the vacuum. If there were no air pres-

sure below the wing, an airplane would not go up. ALEX WOODS, SALMON ARM, BC Show that isn’t there In his article, Truly Canadian TV? It All Boils Down To Suds And Stammers (Reviews), TV critic Douglas Marshall points out that about 60 percent of those watching the CBC National News stay tuned to watch Viewpoint, which follows. One reason why fewer people watch it

than the National News is that many of

us don’t get the chance. Here in Kingston

we receive CBC only through its local commercial affiliate (CKWS-TV). The proprietors of the station substitute four or five commercials for Viewpoint. I don't really blame them. I do blame the CBC executives, however. They should insist that all such national-news and public-affairs programs are carried by their affiliates, which certainly carry every U.S. situation comedy they can get through the CBC. H. M. LOVE, KINGSTON, ONT. 5k Here in London, the National News is followed by a flood of commercials, interlaced with weather reports, local news and sports results. The local CBC affiliate does not carry Viewpoint. How many other Canadian cities with affiliates are in the same boat? Concern with the show’s style must take second place to

concern with its availability.

W. M. DOBELL, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, TALBOT COLLEGE, DEPT. OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO, LONDON Credit goes to Guelph You give credit for the development of a low-calorie dairy spread to a milk cooperative near Kitchener, Ont. (Forecasts— Reports). This is incorrect. This

spread was in fact developed in 1965 by Dr. D. H. Bullock of the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph. The co-operative is merely pro-

ducing it on a commercial basis. — A. M.

PEARSON, PROF. & ACTING CHAIRMAN, DEPT. OF FOOD SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH, GUELPH, ONT. And what’s wrong with Ulster? Your book reviewer, Mark Nichols, remarks: “You may have started life in some awful place like Nova Scotia (the only thing worse might have been Northern Ireland).” Kindly ask that mental

midget what exactly is wrong with Northern Ireland. Nichols sounds like a minibrained Irishman to this Ulster-

man. I do not like the way Maclean’s

slices up Canada’s ties with Great Britain, nor does your anti-American stance appeal to me. RICHARD J. MCCAMMON, KENORA, ONT. continued on pape 105 Medico 2V filters do it give pleasure and peace of mind MEDICO’ FILTER PIPES 66-baffle absorbent replaceable Medico Filters trap juices, tars, nicotine — keep your

mouth cleaner, coolei*. Change filter and your

pipe is clean. Selected, imported briar; nylon

Templeton: spare us

Alan Edmonds’ The Sweet Smell of Charles Templeton was a clean-cut exposé. Not mentioned was Templeton’s abject failure as liaison manager for Lester B. Pearson’s last campaign. May Toronto be spared Templeton as a mayoralty candidate.

REG. B. RADFORD, TORONTO

* Am reasonably sure many people will feel like myself that he is a Jekyll and Hyde. Let’s pray he doesn’t get to be a politician.

IAN N. RUSSELL, BURNABY, BC

The big ones die harder

I wish to correct an apparent misunderstanding on the part of Mr. Kenneth C. Veitch (Mailbag), who comments on my letier regarding trapping (June). I did not say that no humane trap has been devised to kill wild animals. 1 did say thaï no humane trap has been devised to kill animals such as lynx. The Connibear trap, to which Mr. Veitch refers, is effective and humane for killing beaver and muskrat, but at present it cannot be recommended without reserve for larger land-based animals such as fox. fisher, lynx, etc. The Canadian Association for Humane Trapping has distributed thousands of Connibear traps free of charge to trappers, most of whom, as Mr. Veitch says, are interested in more humane methods of trapping. - MISS S.

STEVENSON, CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, CAHT, TORONTO

Chairs are sexier

In A Brief to the Royal Commission on the Status of Women, you raise the question: should women wear trousers? 1 looked carefully at the photographs of those “devastating females" modeling them. Good heavens. The chair I’m sitting on has more feminine qualities than those odd-looking creatures dressed like something out of a horror movie. I cannot imagine any normal male wishing one of those stunned-looking females to be the mother of his future children.

J. SMITS, PITT MEADOWS, BC

* After studying the dreary - looking fashions and the even drearier - looking models, I can finally understand why Canadians look so unhappy; with their lot. A look at the prices makes it even more apparent. Perhaps the perpetrators of these monstrosities are secretly hoping we will actually wear them, in which case I’m sure all the beholders will be rolling in the aisles. - MRS. VICTORIA SIDDON, VICTORIA

British shows are best

So TV critic Douglas Marshall doesn’t understand British slang (Reviews), thus British import comedy is no good. That's tough! Old though they undoubtedly are. I think the British comedy shows, and some of the others, are a whole lot better than that American trash we get thrown at us. I blame the CBC, not poor Michael Bentine, for that extremely unfortunate and unforgivable lapse in screening those assassination shots right after Robert Kennedy was killed. Doesn't the CBC look at what it is going to put on the screen first? Are they really as dumb as all that?

MRS. E. WAKEFIELD, VANCOUVER if