MAILBAG

Toronto the Cool: where’s that? / The law on trial / Charity is not for Nazis / No joy in our schools

January 1 1969

MAILBAG

Toronto the Cool: where’s that? / The law on trial / Charity is not for Nazis / No joy in our schools

January 1 1969

MAILBAG

Toronto the Cool: where’s that? / The law on trial / Charity is not for Nazis / No joy in our schools

IN SAYING that “William Dennison . . . thought out loud that the Prime Minister of Guyana came from Ghana,” writer Ron Haggart is being unfair to Toronto’s Mayor (Fast, Fast Relief From City Hall!). Dennison’s question to the Prime Minister was whether his country planned to join the Caribbean federation. Since Guyana is a Caribbean state (though not an island), and Ghana is not, it is obvious from the context that Dennison did not make an error, but merely a slip of the tongue. He clearly knew what country he was talking about.

BERNARD G. KAYE, TORONTO

You made me wonder if I ever did live in what you call Toronto The Cool. Swinging, vital, creative and exciting Toronto ain’t. Reading the panegyric, I almost forgot that Toronto is the place where Liquor Board outlets close early on Saturday nights, where a steno would have to search hard for any downtown job that pays more than $80 a week, where the downtown shopping is limited to two department stores and a few cheap “shoppes,” where I did not ever see a truly well-dressed woman. Toronto is a hoax, a bore and an eyesore.

MRS. L. WRIGHT, EDMONTON

* Thanks for the kind words about Versafood’s restaurants in the TorontoDominion Centre (A Status Guide To Toronto). But when you referred to the Heritage as being “probably Canada's most expensive,” I suspect you were thinking of The Fifty-Fourth, our rooftop restaurant. Heritage prices are moderate. Fifty-Fourth prices are higher but, we like to think, good value — and no higher than those of other fine restaurants in Toronto. — JAMES P. HOOKS,

VICE-PRESIDENT, VERSAFOOD SERVICES LTD., TORONTO

Law & order

In The Law On Trial you are critical of the severe sentence for shoplifting handed down by Magistrate T. R. BeGora. What you neglected to report was that some time ago BeGora gave ample and repeated warning in his court (and it was reported in the press) that he was going to progressively increase the penalties for shoplifting to the legal maximum in an endeavor to stop it.

JOHN H. PARK, ST. CATHARINES, ONT.

* Your initiative in promoting public discussion of the administration of justice is to be welcomed. Your readers will be interested in knowing that there is a keen and active interest in taking politics out of judicial appointments in this country. One of the suggestions advanced by the Canadian Judicature Society is the estab-

lishment of independent nominating commissions to provide names of qualified persons to the Minister who would retain the ultimate appointing power Pub lie support for this kind of proposal would go a long way toward eliminating the public dissatisfaction evidenced by your questions to the Minister of Justice.

W. A. STEVENSON, DIRECTOR. THE CANADIAN JUDICATURE SOCIETY

* Your report, in these days of increas-

ing disrespect for law and order, was, I think, a disservice to the country. Like so much of the soft thinking of today, it was slanted in favor of the wrongdoer and against the forces trying to preserve order The police have a difficult role to play and, by and large, they do exceeding well - DOUGLAS M. BROWN, ST.

MARTINS, NB

For charity — only

Having read How One Red Cross DoGooder Thwarted The Hunt For 806 Wanted Nazis (Reports), my donation shall go to another charitable organization, so I shall be sure it is being spent on charity work.

C. LESLIE BOOTH, MONTREAL

Add A, B & C

Reading Alexander Ross’s article, Mutual Funds For People Who Aren’t Terribly Hip About Money, we were a little surprised that Royal Trust’s three Managed Funds — A, B and C — were omitted from Ross’s list of “good” trust-company investment funds. Our group of three different types of funds for the individual investor is the second largest in the trustcompany section ($41 million) and the funds have enjoyed a growth and performance record matching, or bettering, comparable funds referred to in your summary. - T. R. LEE, GENERAL SUPERVISOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS, THE ROYAL TRUST COMPANY, MONTREAL

The Ron Gostick file

Jon Ruddy’s article, Ron Gostick Makes A Living Telling People Trudeau Is A Comsymp . . . , could not rouse within me one iota of anger. Its content, written in a bourgeois style, is too absurd and asinine.

L. L. CLEMENTINE JAHRAUS VICTORIA

* Very soon we shall be looking for many people like Gostick to lead us.

JAS. THORSON, LONDON, ONT.

* You neglected to state that Gostick also accused Trudeau of belonging to an organization opposing the war effort. Gostick’s big mistake was to send out his pamphlet. It contained nothing that

would not win votes for Trudeau Gostick was just too old-fashioned to know that such things are no longer considered detrimental, but praiseworthy.

J. A. SPENCER, MAGRATH, ALTA

* To make Gostick look ridiculous, Jon Ruddy refers to an article written approximately 18 years ago. This is very weak argumentation. Gostick may make many mistakes, but he dares stand up for the well-being of this country and is willing to take abuse for it.

H. GROEN, DUNDAS, ONT.

Who needs failure?

Re your Editorial, The Invaluable Lesson Of Failure: Pedantic failure, which you basically describe, has no place in any field of education — not even in relation to the Pavlovian method of conditioning for animals. Intentionally or arbitrarily, a pedantic teacher is the only individual who succeeds in failing a child. Let us try to remember that we want the child to learn, not to pass or fail our oftentimes irrelevant stimulus-response system Let the system respond to the needs of the individual, not the individual to a precast system.

REGINALD A. COMEAU, PAWCATUCK, CONNECTICUT

* Apparently you do not understand why the “familiar yardsticks of a child’s progress in school” are used. Examinations, grades, class standings, the strap and the idea of failure, all are used as threats to force the child to learn. What many adults do not realize is that it is not necessary to force a child to learn if he is provided with an environment that enables him to learn. Our children have a right to the joy of learning, and this our public-school system has failed to give them.

MRS. H. GRILLER, WINNIPEG

Bull for Britain

In The Canadian Bull Who Is Energetically Backing Britain (Reports), Jon Ruddy says that a Hereford bull, which is a beef-breed animal, was turned over to the British Milk Marketing Board. Why? Surely it would have been more sensible to have sent a Canadian dairybreed bull. If this Hereford bull is as good as your article suggests, it seems wasteful to cross it with milk - breed strains.

W. M. WILSON, WEST VANCOUVER

Jon Ruddy replies: ‘‘The British Milk Marketing Board deals with beef animals also. The British Hereford herds were hardest hit, and the Canadian bull will be used to build them up.”

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MAILBAG from page 14

No need to strike

It's been some time since I have seen an Editorial more concise and to the point than One Guaranteed Wage We ALL Need. I can only hope that it will have the same favorable reaction from those we elected to govern us and who should by now have realized that the “right” to strike in the civil service has turned to an abuse of the public’s rights.

M. DIMENTBERG, COTE ST. LUC, QUE.

Voice for People Out There

Could TV critic Douglas Marshall’s CARPOT (Canadian Association Representing People Out There) become a reality, with membership cards and a roster spreading across Canada? Such a group could provide to program directors and advertisers tangible evidence of how well-liked or disliked their programs are.

CHARLES H. MORSHEAD, ROCKINGHAM, NS

Think tank

Re These Men . . . Want To Drain Lake Erie: I was reminded of a little song my mother used to sing when I was a small boy in the 1890s:

They are going to drain Lake Erie They are going to start in June And when they get done You can tell by the sun There’ll be whiskers on the Moon. Surely some way can be found to save this beautiful lake. How about this: stop the release of pollutants and keep the bottom of the lake stirred up by pumping immense quantities of air into the sludge and flushing it away.

GILMOUR YOUNGS, CHIPPAWA, ONT.

* Keep the new thinking coming to us! The article presented the audacity needed to carry this land into its future, to possess its heritage.

REV. LIONEL F. ROWE, BALCARRES, SASK.

New Left: inexplicable explained

Where have all the flower children gone from your editorial staff? Your Editorial, A Strange, Inexplicable Silence From The New Left, sounds like an afterdinner speech at a Manufacturers’ Association banquet. You assume that members of the New Left were duped by Soviet propaganda, simply because they did not demonstrate before the Soviet embassy. They knew that parading could only harm Dubcek’s cause: you don’t help a weak, defenseless friend completely under a bully’s control by embarrassing the bully. What’s more, the New Left believed that, if East-West Cold War tensions could be eased by our chief friend, the U.S., withdrawing from Vietnam, a further thawing might take place. They believed they might have influence over a friend, whereas they had none over Russia, an apparent enemy. Now, of course, they are angry at both great powers, frustrated because the Soviet Union can use Vietnam as justification (or at least as an excuse) for her own aggression, and discouraged because it would seem the Cold War deep-freeze is returning. - DAVID P. REIMER, VICTORIA □