TALKBACK

TALKBACK

August 1 1969
TALKBACK

TALKBACK

August 1 1969

TALKBACK

Stanley Gray: why pay to have freedom abused? / Quebec: butt out, Anglais / Airports: make them safe—fast

YOUR EDITORIAL concerning reaction to the award of a Canada Council grant to McGill’s Stanley Gray (The Disturbing Backlash From The Campus Revolt) calls for a response. Many of us recognize that a democracy needs to include the right to dissent. However, surely this does not include giving public money to “a radical, an avowed Marxist, and Marxist goals” — as you point out — “are not simply educational reform but the total overturn of our way of life.” Gray has lived up to this rather well, and you suggest we should ignore this to prove our love of freedom. This is a high form of naïveté. Freedom, with all its virtues, cannot stand unlimited abuse.

G. R. MORRISON, ESPAÑOLA, ONT.

>k I fail to see why the System should finance the aims of those who wish to destroy the System. Furthermore, if Gray is as clever as reputed, he should be able to make it on his own, without dipping into the purse of the taxpayer who is already being gouged beyond reason.

J. S. VANDERPLOEG, TORONTO

* Stanley Gray is described as a Marxist, but his actions stamp him for what he actually is — a Stalinist, who wants to create a master-slave state. To suggest that the opposition to a Canada Council grant for Gray is an “anti-student backlash” is nonsense. The only backlash involved is that of common sense against stupidity.

H. C. LEWIS, WILLOWDALE, ONT.

sk What disturbed me most was the muddled thinking about democratic rights to dissent and what Gray stands for. I defend the right to express one’s opinions in a democracy. However, we are committed in attempting to change our society to democratic means. It is Gray who advocates change by violent and totalitarian means. If we followed his philosophy, we would return to the law of the jungle.

DR. I. Et. UPMALIS, KITCHENER, ONT.

“Get off our backs!”

Re René Lévesque: The Anglais Cheer As He Calls For Canada’s Break-up: When is English Canada going to rid itself of its French-Canadian hang-up? It must be horrible for all those people occupying the nine provinces to have to pin their security on one province, on us all-too-human French Canadians. It’s time they got off our backs and started acting like real men. It's time they worried about that vast territory they occupy and figured out exactly what they're going to do with it. The Americans have been doing the job for them too damn long and aren’t going to be able to continue for much longer. — FRÉDÉRIC CÔTÉ, OTTAWA

* Lévesque speaks of an independent Quebec dealing with the rest of Canada. What

would we have to deal about? What would they have to offer us that we don’t already have? We could get along without them much better than they could get along without us. Their wiser and more responsible leaders know it.

ALBERT KATHAN, EDMONTON

k So a Trent University student is thinking of coming to Quebec after he graduates to work for Lévesque’s Parti Québécois. I am sure that French Canada is eagerly awaiting this heroic “white man” to show the natives how to win their freedom. Poor little English-Canadian students have discovered that their society is so thoroughly Americanized that, instead of staying home and fighting their own political battle, they cop out and try to join Quebec’s. What possible use could French Canada or Mr. Sincerity Lévesque have for losers, idealistic ones or not? - LORNE STE. CROIX. MONTREAL

* I read with interest Walter Stewart's article on the problems being faced by the non-French in Quebec (A Place To Stand?). I am married to a French Quebecker. I don’t think Quebec is going to go for only one language — that would kill any hope it has for new industries. We need both languages for the economy’s sake. If we drop one — English — Quebeckers can say goodby to work and alio to unemployment. We English Quebeckers are not worried for ourselves, but for our French-Quebecker friends. What will become of them if they drop English?

MRS. DORIS CARRIER, STE. FOY, QUE.

The mess in our skies

I support the validity of Walter Stewart’s article on the crisis in air-safety systems at our airports, We’re Cracking Up Down Here! But I can only consider Stewart naïve if he seriously believes that a “godawful” midair collision would initiate the much-

needed reform. Some poor controller would end up carrying the can.

J. M. ROBINSON, REGINA

=k I would hope this most shocking article brings awareness to many people of the intolerable strains placed on the controllers, and that the recommendations made to alleviate these problems will generate activity before the calamities occur that have been predicted. Wouldn’t some of the many millions budgeted for bilingualizing the federal civil service be better spent on a cause more useful and less emotional — such as airtraffic safety?

G. B. HILL. NORTH VANCOUVER

ík Money, should not be a factor when lives are at the other end of the scale. Surely the $46 million spent on the National Arts Centre in Ottawa would have gone a long way toward providing better air - safety equipment and training.

MRS. C. B. MARTIN, BRANDON, MAN.

>k Hats off to Walter Stewart for his dramatically revealing account. I am presently in my “check-out” phase of training after returning from the five-month course in Ottawa. The morale spoken of is extremely low. — G. H. CLARK, WILLOWDALE, ONT.

The hidey-hole caper

Re Walter Stewart’s article on the Diefenbunker, A Hush-Hush Report On Ottawa's Top-Secret Hidey-Hole (Reports): Is Mr. Stewart planning to go into journalism when he grows up? — w. j. MCWILLIAMS, REGINA

Freedom — for taxpayers?

In The Lively Arts, Mavor Moore recommends that there be no restrictions on what can be performed on stage, or shown on the screen. Before all limits are abandoned.

all projects that include theatres and are financed even in part by public funds should be frozen until a referendum is held to see if taxpayers are interested in supporting a form of art that accepts no legal or other limits. With all that freedom kicking around, they might like to be free from compulsion to support the arts.

HERB MARTINDALE, CALEDONIA, ONT.

* If we just sit like goofy chickens, too paralyzed for even a last struggle, we deserve what is surely coming. The Roman Empire passed to the point of no return by sliding into this same slough of moral degradation. Our “new” generation of sneering perverts, will, of course, laugh at that, calling it “narrow-minded.” But if all decent people sit idle while degenerates destroy our society, we all go down.

DAVE LENT, YELLOWKNIFE, NWT

T Mavor Moore says: “Your true summer festival works only in a place next to impossible to get to.” With full air service restored to Vancouver Island, Victoria’s new summer festival may fail Moore’s inaccessibility test. From July 11 to August 30, Victoria Fair will present a professional repertory company at the McPherson Playhouse in Hamlet, The Merchant Of Venice and Tartuffe. Also scheduled are 14 recitals, five art exhibitions, and recorder rallies in Centennial Square. - DAVID H. DUNSMUIR, DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES, UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

“Men name the game”

The women who picketed Maclean’s offices in protest against The Natural Superiority Of Men only proved the truth hurt. Men are born superior. If women would only try to be themselves instead of trying to be men, the war of the sexes would be over and women would enjoy greater fulfillment in their lives. Face it, girls, you can’t destroy your biological heritage with placards and slogans. As long as there is human life on this planet, men will name the game.

GILBERT DION, PARRY SOUND, ONT.

* The implication of the word “natural” is that one acquires certain characteristics or skills through birth. For the most part, about 90 percent of human behavior is learned behavior. I tend to agree with Dr. Fionel Tiger that there appears to be a possible bonding propensity in societies and that this may have universal significance. However, bonding is a human capacity — not exclusive to males. When women obtain the opportunity to band together, they do it effectively and well. There is a plethora of women’s organizations in all parts of Western society. Substantial research has shown that there is nothing “natural” about man’s ability to be aggressive, warlike and power-seeking.

PAT BUCKLEY, LECTURER, COLUMBIA JUNIOR COLLEGE, VANCOUVER

* Men bond with each other as often as not through fear of their own inability and deficiency. The false masculinity exemplified by so many male clubs all too often offers little more than violence, aggression, selfishness. Man can only act as a man in the true sense when he is alone or when bonded with a woman and with children. The baboons have too long tried to run things. As a man, 1 am about ready to let the female of our species take over.

DR. DEREK C. ASKEY, BURLINGTON, ONT.

* Women have been too passive, credulous, conformable. But today thinking women are rejecting man-invented deities and institutions — they want action; an end to human slaughter and the wanton destruction of animal life, an end to slums, to poverty for the many. Women seek to advance beyond this barbarism imposed on humanity by “men in groups.”

MRS. A. S. HARRIS, TRURO, NS

Now let’s have some more progressive pieces, like: The Natural Superiority Of The Wealthy Classes, by J. Paul Getty; The Natural Superiority Of The White Race, by George Wallace. I must apologize for offering my opinion: I am only a woman. MARIAN CANTY, VANCOUVER

I am a 16-year-old, grade-11 student. Dr. Tiger has never visited this “primitive” community or he would not be calling it Cat Harbour. It was renamed Lumsden more than 50 years ago.

CHRISTINE GIBBONS, LUMSDEN, NFLD.

“No” to Greece

Of course Greece is a wonderful country for a holiday, as Robert Thomas Allen points out in Journey To Another Planet: Greece. However, it is a dictatorship of a particularly brutal nature. The fact that projected tourism in Greece was down almost 50 percent in 1968 indicates that some people, at least, on moral grounds, have said “No” to a holiday in an exquisitely beautiful country marred by concentration camps, the use of organized torture, rigid press censorship, and all the hateful apparatus of dictatorial regimes.

DR. J. RICHMOND, CANADIAN COMMITTEE FOR DEMOCRACY IN GREECE, MONTREAL

Edmonton scores more than 20

The New Learning —It Starts When The Walls Come Down, by Alan Edmonds, gives an excellent portrayal of what goes on in the new open-area schools, but it tends to minimize progress in other parts of the country. The Edmonton public-school system alone has more than a score of such schools and educationists from many parts of Canada and the United States have visited Edmonton to see what is being done. — G. H. STOUT, INFORMATION OFFICER, EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOL BOARD, EDMONTON

“Poor hockey”? Poor us

J. D. Adams says, “U.S. colleges offer poor hockey competition to Canadian universities” (Talkback). Cornell and Toronto in the east, Denver and Alberta in the west boast the top four hockey squads on the continent. Last year Cornell beat U of T 1-0 and this year 7-2. Denver bested Alberta 5-1 and 3-2 and the Canadian Nationals 5-3 and 3-2. It all adds up to this: the best hockey talent is finding its way into U.S. universities. —

MURRAY DRYDEN, ETOBICOKE NATIONALS’ HOCKEY CLUB, TORONTO □