People

People

Jane O’Hara January 22 1979
People

People

Jane O’Hara January 22 1979

People

In many ways it has been a star-spangled bummer season for NFL pro cheerleaders, but the 36 members of the Dallas Cowgirls—veterans that they are—plan to put it all behind them when they shimmy into Miami Sunday for their third consecutive Super Bowl assignment. For some cheerleading squads it has been a disappointing year. And talk about casualties! The Denver Broncos’ Pony Express lost two members when they were charged with rolling an undercover policeman and the San Diego Chargettes were disbanded when one of them posed nude in a Playboy pictorial spread. In Washington, the Redskinettes were penalized for having too much backfield in motion and ordered to cover up, while in L.A. the Embraceable Ewes were told to clean up their titillating but tacky uniforms. Through it all, the Cowgirls have survived to the finals. After weeks of putting on their hot pants one leg at a time and spending hours on the pompom practice field, they’re ready to give 110 per cent when the Cowboys take on the Pittsburgh Steelers. What of the Steelers, who’ll have no girls on the sidelines? “Our fans don’t need other stimulation,” said Joe Gordon, publicist for the team.

□ t started as an experiment in behavior modification. It developed into a master’s thesis and an allergy, but only recently has it found its rightful place m outside the halls of academe—on CBC g radio. Some of My Best Rats are Friends is a two-hour radio musical | written by Cliff Jones (Rockabye £ Hamlet) starring Martin Short and “ Nancy White (to be aired Jan. 28 and 29) £ based on Jones’s experience of being ^ cooped up with 88 rats for 36 days in a lab at the University of Calgary. Although the little rodents didn’t talk and sing (as they do in the musical) they did give Jones a debilitating allergy which recurred recently when the 35-year-old songwriter posed with them for CBC promotional photos. What price publicity? “When we went in for the pictures I had forgotten I was allergic,” said Jones. “Then all of a sudden I recognized the smell and started sneezing, my eyes watered and my head was exploding. It took me a day to recover.” With rats like those, who needs enemies?

hen we last saw Rocky, played and written by Sylvester Stallone,

he had just gone the distance with Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers), his face resembling the topography of the Appalachian Mountains. In the upcoming sequel, Rocky II,the sentimental ideali-

zation of the little guy continues with Rocky recovering from plastic surgery and marrying his true love, Adrian (Talia Shire), who naturally wants him to fight no more. Rocky tries commercials, but he’s no Joe Namath. He tries to get a desk job, but alas, he’s semiliterate, so eventually he ends up working at the gym cleaning out sweat buckets. Meanwhile, Apollo is hankering for a rematch and Adrian falls into a coma after giving birth to Rocky’s child. When she recovers and finds they have been evicted from their house, Adrian admits the best thing is for Rocky to get back to the ring. Smart girl. Enter Burgess Meredith, the crusty old trainer, who whips Rocky into shape. “At first I was going to have the fight in the Roman Coliseum and get blessed by the Pope,” said Stallone, who also wrote the sequel. “But I figured I didn’t want to stray too far from home.”

©onservative fortunes being what they are in Quebec (the party holds only two of 74 federal seats) it’s not surprising that Tory MP Flora MacDonald recently took a busman’s holiday in la belle province, although it wasn’t her leader Joe Clark who advised: “Get thee to a nunnery.” MacDonald spent her vacation at the Monastère des Augustines, a Frenchspeaking Catholic convent of 20 nuns in St. Georges, where she brushed up on her French, skated, skied and kept a keen ear to the political permafrost. Since it was her second vacation there in six months, MacDonald was familiar with the lights out at 10 o’clock rule, complimentary of the sisters’ homecooked meals and simply rapturous about the tranquil majesty of the surrounding landscape. “I got a very good

rest,” said MacDonald. “I wasn’t actively politicking, but when I went to people’s homes for soirees, we talked politics. They know who I am.”

anadian journalist John Burns has been a bother to bureaucracies from Ottawa to Peking, causing the mighty at least to fumble if not to fall. A former Globe and Mail correspondent, the 34-year-old Burns has been The New York Times’ man in South Africa for the past three years, typing away at the problems of apartheid, black unemployment, alcoholism and violence. One of his recent stories, an examination of a black squatter settlement near Cape Town which the government had planned to bulldoze, brought cries of “vicious propaganda” from South African Foreign Affairs Minister Roelof Botha and prompted government offi-

cials to discuss his deportation. Although it’s highly unlikely he’ll be expelled, Burns doesn’t expect much sympathy from the Canadian government. Eight years ago, when Burns was transferred from The Globe and Mail’s Ottawa bureau to its Peking bureau, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau offered these parting words: “Don’t get into trouble over there, Mr. Burns. Because I won’t help you if you do.”

r lot of yelling and screaming LrA has gone on around here,” commented Canadian actor John Vernon (.Animal House) as he surveyed the $400,000 set of It Rained All Night the Day I Left, a $5-million Canada-Israël co-production recently filmed in the Sinai desert: an appropriate setting for adversary relationships. In one corner, actress Sally Kellerman (M*A*S*H*) was complaining about not being paid for a costume. “It’s a question of hon-

or,” shouted Kellerman. “I show up here every day.” Replied the production manager: “You turn up—but you turn up late.” In another corner, Canadian Lisa Langlois, 19, (Blood Relatives, Violette Noziere) was upset about her love scene with actor Tony Curtis, 53, being chopped. “It’s all very disappointing,” said Langlois. Curtis too, was not particularly happy, riled into silence by Hungarian director Nicholas Gessner, who insisted on telling him to “act wet, Tony. Act wet!” While Curtis was heard to mumble, “All I want to do is get out of here,” Vernon took a more responsible approach, announcing: “All right, let’s shoot this turkey.”

Dt’s the stuff of which Hollywood’s myths are made. In the tradition of Lana Turner’s discovery at Schwab’s Drugstore, 61-year-old Pierre Sévigny

was recently plucked from the lobby of Montreal’s Ritz Carlton for a bit part in the movie Agency. Sévigny, the former cabinet minister of John Diefenbaker (1959-63) who was implicated in the 1966 Gerda Munsinger affair, was exactly what Montreal movie producer Robert Lantos {In Praise of Older Women) was looking for to play the role of a “behind-the-scenes political mover”and boss of Robert Mitchum. Although the makeup department had a go at him, wardrobe didn’t bother since Sévigny’s own clothes—a dark overcoat, a lowslung fedora and the ever-present walking stick—were perfect for the part. As to his future in the flicks? Said Sévigny, who admitted he was apprehensive about the one-scene role: “There haven’t been any other offers. I’m not the great star overnight.”

Jane O’Hara