Letters

Letters

January 29 1979
Letters

Letters

January 29 1979

Letters

Sowing seeds of famine

The article, Sowing the Seeds of Suspicion (Dec. 18), alarms and perturbs me greatly. We operate a small privately owned seed business and have been involved in the industry since 1950. We know from experience and from historical records just what improved varieties of plant life have done to help feed the masses. However, your article makes no mention of improvements in world food supplies as a result of these new and better strains and varieties. To persons unknowledgeable in agriculture, the article plants seeds of fear, mistrust and famine in a world needing increased amounts of food for human survival.

N. M. ROTHWELL, ROTHWELL SEEDS LIMITED, LINDSAY, ONT.

Kinder calendar

I am grateful for Warren Gerrard’s cover story, Kids Without Rights (Nov. 20). Here in Germany, Canada is known as dreamland, but for Canadian children realities seem to be much harder and colder than the stuff dreams are made of. The report, Admittance Restricted: The Child as Citizen in Canada, is indeed well timed. However, I hope the individual effort in Canada in establishing the rights and bringing about an understanding of children as individuals—not as underdeveloped adults—is as strong as that which is taking place here. In Berlin, profits from calendars sold in the name of Kinder in West Berlin are directed to ameliorate and provide programs and there is a list of events and activities organized by the Kindertag Committee. We are living on top of one another in this city, but perhaps we are finally learning to stand side by side with our children.

J. M. JOYAL BAMBERG, BERLIN, WEST GERMANY

Who’s manipulating whom?

The article, Big Stick, Slow Burn (Jan. 1), on the Asbestos Corporation takeover appears to imply that the pauvre Quebec government, in its attempt to buy into Quebec’s asbestos industry, is suffering from the manipulative practices of a foreign capitalistic monster— General Dynamics Corporation. However, Quebec has yet to make an offer to purchase to either majority or minority shareholders. The Quebec government’s report on the value of Asbestos Corp. shares is much less than the $100 per share that was calculated by the consul-

tants hired by General Dynamics. The facts of the matter are that Asbestos has a replacement value in excess of $150 per share; the pre-tax cash flow of the company approaches $17 per share; the working capital alone, less all debt, approaches $25 per share; and that the market price of the shares should not be a meaningful ingredient in the government’s desire to acquire the company. The minority shareholders caught in the middle of this crossfire, are selling their 100 to 1,000 shares of stock and determining the value of 2.8 million shares by so doing. Both sides should be required to release their reports to shareholders and knowledgeable Canadian security analysts and only then will you be able to say that the market price in this situation is meaningful.

NED GOODMAN, SEYMOUR SCHULICH,

BEUTEL, GOODMAN & COMPANY LTD., INVESTMENT COUNSEL, TORONTO

Kaleidoscope shroud

If I could afford 100 copies of the Is This Jesus? (Jan. 1) issue, with its extraordinary Shroud of Turin cover, I would hand out every blessed one to our congregation. This issue is a veritable watershed, kaleidoscope and spectrum of the changing social scenery, plus what happens behind the scenes.

PASTOR WILLIAM GLENESK, RUNDLE MEMORIAL UNITED CHURCH, BANFF, ALTA.

Send me your bigots

When I read the article, Bigots in Bedsheets ... (Jan. 8), on the Ku Klux Klan, I was appalled to learn that they have members in Canada. How dare they enter our beloved country and spoil its

image. To me these people are nothing but reincarnations of Hitler, Mussolini and Eichman. The only people they love are the reflections in their mirrors.

ED BUNDT, ARMSTRONG, B.C.

Roll those credits again

As the director of the film, Skip Tracer, I was greatly flattered by Lawrence O’Toole’s perceptive review, Crime and Punishment Credit-Card Style (Dec. 18). Unfortunately, the press material erred in crediting me with composing the music. The music director was J. Douglas Dodd, who spent untold hours composing, producing, and performing his distinctive score. The piano theme was composed and played by Linton Garner. I would hate to rob these gentlemen of the credit they so richly deserve.

ZALE R. DALEN, HIGHLIGHT PRODUCTIONS LTD., VANCOUVER

Motherhood issue

As a Tolkien enthusiast, I found the article, Mythful Thinking (Dec. 4), on the film, The Lord of the Rings, to be offensive. The statement, “For those whose love for J.R.R. Tolkien and his furry-footed little Hobbits is superseded only by memories of their mothers’ breasts,” which refers to Tolkien followers, was uncalled for. Criticism of the movie is a matter of personal taste; but attacking the book and its supporters through the movie is unfair.

STEPHEN TURNER, HALIFAX

Upsy-downsy democracy

Bravo Barbara Amiel—the article, This Was the Year the Future Began to Unfold . . . (Jan. 1), was a timely warning against encouraging our politicians to administer our morality for us. The prospect of having our standards of behavior delivered by government programs is unsettling enough, but the notion that a flood of political decrees designed to appease various pressure groups should take the place of the individual moral judgment of Canadians surely is democracy turned upside down.

GUS BEHNE, OTTAWA

Question the questionners

I can imagine some of the responses you must be receiving concerning the article, The Study of the Mind ... (Dec. 11), on psychologists. In an age of deification of the various experts my generation has declared fit to guide us, I am encouraged that someone is still questioning their usefulness. As a university student for the last few years I have developed a healthy distrust of much of the research and the experiments a lot of our knowledge is based upon. There is a need for people who question the knowledge and its proponents.

KIM TAYLOR, GUELPH, ONT.