People

Blood will tell

Marsha Boulton November 26 1979
People

Blood will tell

Marsha Boulton November 26 1979

Blood will tell

People

When Susan Hogan was playing in the David Cronenberg horror film The Brood, she found the master of terrifying schlock to be “a bit sick.” As a kindergarten teacher beaten to death by dwarf nasties, Hogan discovered that Cronenberg had an eerie way with makeup. “He knows exactly where to put all the blood,” she shudders. After The Brood, 32-year-old Hogan moved into the wholesome role of a coastal pilot in the CBC adventure series Ritter's Cove, but now she’s back in terror, minus the blood. Hogan is teamed up with Paul Michael Glaser (aka Starsky of TV’s Starsky and Hutch) as a successful sculptor in Phobia. Hogan’s role is “emotional and scary” but this time she doesn’t have to cope with Cronenberg gore—just five death-row murders.

As a rhinestone cowboy, Glen Campbell made his mark on middle-ofthe-road music and, at 41, the babyfaced crooner has decided to take a political stand. A Democrat-turned-Republican, Campbell recently declared himself a political “agnostic.” His reason is as simple as apple pie. “I think the political situation in America sucks.”

The streets of Montreal have been witness to some unusual sights and, recently, the harlequin duet of comic Buddy Hackett and blossoming starlet Yasmine Bleeth has been turning fash-

ionable heads along St. Catherine Street. Bleeth, 11, and Hackett, 55, are paired in a film called Babe, which tells the tale of a downtrodden vaudeville star who imparts his “trade secrets” to a young girl who wants to be a disco star. The problem now is finding an ending, and producer Rafal Zielinski has decided to ask Montrealers to help out. So far three scenarios have been set: Hackett strangles Bleeth because she becomes too successful with his old material; or Bleeth strangles Hackett to put him out of his misery; or, a real tearjerker, Hackett dies of natural

causes and Bleeth has a psychic death flash in the middle of a disco song, which causes her to faint with grief.

When Jimmy Carter cancelled his trip to Ottawa he left Governor-General Ed Schreyer with a freezer full of ducks, but there was no such problem in Winnipeg where Rosalynn Carter showed up last week to receive the fourth International Award of the St. Boniface General Hospital Research Foundation. More than 2,500 guests, including Maureen McTeer and U.S. ambassador to Canada Kenneth Curtis, paid $50 each to attend the event and tuck into avocado and seafood cocktails, Canadian prime rib with Madeira sauce and flaming baked Alaska. “We had hoped to dim the lights and have waitresses carry the dessert with flaming torches,” says Klaus Fuerniss, who orchestrated the feasting, “but the Secret Service didn’t like that idea.”

S lAfhat has brunette pigtails, a ragged I WW kilt, bright yellow banana-shaped £ Wellington boots and is no blood-relation to Farley Mowat? It’s the “mad Scot,” Billy Connolly, who will be exposing his self-styled “vulgar lavatory humor” across Canada for the next few weeks. In Scotland, Connolly is known as the “Big Yin” (big one) and he has become the cult hero of a nationally syndicated comic strip called Bring On the Big Yin, in which the protagonist celebrates such “national pastimes” as watching football, drinking whisky and vomiting (usually in that order). Connolly, 36, is soon to be seen in a film called Absolution in which he co-stars opposite Richard Burton. “My role is very close to the Billy Connolly image,” Billy says with heavy-brogued

irreverence. “I play a freewheeling, banjo-playing corrupter of young schoolboys.”

The childhood memories of rock star Elton John, now 32, are littered with hoofprints. Long before John himself became a pop icon, he idolized Roy Rogers, still twanging away at 67, and remembers a prepubescent meeting with the fresh-faced cowboy as “a big moment in my life.” Recently John was shocked when he was told that Rogers has his golden palomino, Trigger (who passed away in 1965 at the age of 33), stuffed and mounted in the bedroom he shares with wife, Dale Evans, 67.* “I hope Dale doesn’t go before Roy does,” John said with a whinny.

When old hockey players retire, they rarely hang up their skates, they just wait for the opportunity to play with their contemporaries. Last Friday, 25 NHL Oldtimers and 30 Oldtimers from Leaside, Ontario, formed battle lines in a display of geriatric puck-passing. Gently body-checking for the NHL were Norm Ullman, Harry Howell and Brian McFarlane, who battled Leaside (and NHL) veterans Cal Gardner, George Armstrong, Brit Selby and Frank Mahovlich. The final score was 11-8 in favor of the NHL Oldtimers, and all of the proceeds went to help pay for a new roof for the community sports centre. The biggest surprise of the evening came when 73-year-old Peter Mahovlich Sr. was presented with an award honoring his service. For 22 years, he has been the arena’s official skate sharpener.

The townsfolk of Inuvik have every right to think that “southern” filmmakers are crazy. This fall a whole crew arrived in the community to start

*In fact, Trigger, Dale's buckskin gelding, Buttermilk (who died in 1976 at 30), and the Rogers'faithful German shepherd, Bullet (1970 aetat 15), are preserved in the Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum at Victorville, California.

filming the first of seven made-for-TV shows based on the stories of Jack London. And they brought their own snow—Styrofoam flakes which had to be fluffed constantly by hovering helicopters while actors Doug McGrath and Richard Fitzpatrick tried to look frostbitten at the height of Arctic Indian summer.

When Spanish dictator Francisco Franco lay on his deathbed he pronounced the situation “atado y bien atado. ” He meant that he was leaving his country’s affairs neatly tied up. But four years later the package is coming apart at its conjugal seams. Before he

died, Franco tried to inject some of Europe’s bluest blood into the family tree and the result was the wedding of his granddaughter Maria del Carmen, the duchess of Cadiz, to Alfonso de Bourbon, a grandson of Spain’s King Alfonso XIII. But recently the 28-year-old duchess has been keeping company with an“older man”—Jean Maria Rossi—and de Bourbon, 42, has been disco cruising with Parisian blondes. The only solution is an embarrassing annulment, since divorce is illegal in Spain, and the court of King Juan Carlos is in a tizzy. “It’s amazing it lasted so long,” says a friend of the duchess. “She has absolutely nothing in common with dull old Alfonso. Her grandfather pushed her into marriage.”

Child star Ricky Schroder, 9, who stole hearts as Jon Voight’s sidekick in The Champ, is on his way to winning veteran actor William Holden’s affection—on and off screen. Schroder has taken to calling Holden “Billy Willy” between takes on the set of The Earthliny, which is being filmed in the outback 200 miles northwest of Sydney, Australia, with a full complement of wild kangaroos and emus serving as extras. The crew has never seen such good-natured kibitzing, as playful Schroder and granite-faced Holden play private jokes on each other and come out hugging. “The kid has the best instincts of anyone I’ve worked with,” says Holden, 61, who credits Schroder’s parents for “screwing his head on right.”

Edited by Marsha Boulton