People

People

Marsha Boulton December 17 1979
People

People

Marsha Boulton December 17 1979

People

It began as a real Hollywood fairy tale for Yvette Mimieux. At 17 she was “discovered” by a talent scout and whisked off to the sound stages of MGM studios. Her first film was the 1960 version of H.G. Wells’s The Time Machine and 20 years later she’s back in another sci-fi adventure The Black Hole. Mimieux spent 5V2 months working on the film, but the pace wasn’t excessively gruelling. “Besides, I was the only woman,”

she laughs. Now 40, Mimieux is tired of being typecast as a “wounded fawn” character. “I want meaty, dramatic roles with great directors,” she says. In fact, her favorite director is husband Stanley Donen, whose credits include Singin' in the Rain and Charade. Their next project will be a romantic comedy, and after that Mimieux says she would like to work with Ingmar Bergman, “in black and white.”

Alan Alda and Robert Redford make a striking couple in support of the Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S. But Burt Reynolds proves that not all Hollywood mouthpieces are without chauvinism. “If I’m gonna take a run at a girl, I always tell her: ‘Lady, I’m gonna take a run at you,’ ” Reynolds has said, showing all the poise of a rutting line-

backer. Reynolds also finds it unfortunate that some women “have to arm wrestle to get their own way.” He believes that “an attractive lady doesn’t have to fight for rights.”

In the box-office best seller 10, Bo Derek played top number to Dudley Moore and all the time Sam Jones loomed in the background as her bridegroom. Even in numerical shadows, Jones is an 11. A former health-club instructor, truck driver and semipro football player, Jones is six-foot-three and 200 pounds of solid hunk. Last November he appeared as a contestant on the TV romance game show The Dating Game. He lost the girl, but he won the heart of a Monte Carlo matron who happened to be watching and immediately spotted Jones’s wet T-shirt look as the stuff stars are made of. The matron called her son-in-law who happened to

be Dino De Laurentiis, producer of such film epics as The Bible and King Kong. Such mother-in-law clout got Jones his first starring role as the lead in De Laurentiis’ version of Flash Gordon. Belated and just deserts for an actor who claims to have spent his first four months in Hollywood “living on a steady diet of saltine crackers and water.”

íílguess I was a dull Canadian, but lhaving lived in Nassau and travelled the world, I nowhope I’m not quite as dull as I used to be,” says expatriate Montrealer Frank Mills, who headed south last spring when the success of his song Music Box Dancer created an untenable tax situation. In March, 1978, an impecunious Mills took out a taxidriver’s licence in Toronto, but his al-

bum The Poet & I sold 1.5 million copies before he could turn on the meter. Now a millionaire, 37-year-old Mills has learned to manage his own finances quite well and thinks it’s about time the Canadian government shaped up. “The country should be run like a large corporation,” he says. “No government agency should exist unless it’s making a profit.”

It’s no secret that U.S. presidential candidates need cash to finance the long stump to the White House. Toward that end, singer Linda Ronstadt recently feted 60 faithful followers of her Spaceship Earth candidate-boy-friend Governor Jerry Brown. The Brown 60 assembled at Ronstadt’s Malibu beach house and each paid $500 for the privilege. Not to be outdone, Ethel Kennedy has scheduled a pre-Christmas fundraiser for her brother-in-law Senator Edward Kennedy. The gala affair will be held at “Hickory Hill,” a family homestead just outside of Washington. For $1,000 each, 500 guests will enjoy three hours of cocktails and buffet. It’s only 500, says Ethel—that’s all the house can hold. Ronstadt is now thinking about a New Year’s party. The political drum beat goes on.

No one can accuse the Canadian book promotion machine of slowing down for the Christmas season. To promote their weighty biography of former liberal “minister of everything” C. D. Howe, authors William Kilbourn and Robert Bothwell are mounting a campaign to have the late politician nominated and elected in the wake of Pierre Trudeau’s resignation. Armed with placards and pamphlets, the normally reticent pair are taking to the streets to convince the public that the dead politician is the solution to Canada’s problems. “He was a good parliamentarian and he always believed in Canada,” explains Bothwell. According to Kilbourn, Howe would be favored by Liberal prince John Turner and his mother Phyllis Turner, who served as the most senior woman on Howe’s Wartime Prices and Trade Board. “There is support for Howe in all three parties,” says Bothwell, with his tongue firmly in cheek. Bothwell also expects the necro-political campaign to receive support from beyond the grave. “We would expect that Howe will have Mackenzie King to support him.”

Royal husbands are usually caught in a royal bind when it comes to things like commercial endorsements and TV appearances, but that doesn’t seem to hold true for Princess Anne’s spouse,

Mark Phillips. He began his career by lending visual support to British Leyland automobiles in return for $150,000 sponsorship for his stable of six showjumpers through the British Equestrian Association. This spring he will be mass-viewed as a competitor in such “games” as swimming, canoeing and tenpin bowling for a British TV network, which has promised to turn over the proceeds to help send the British equestrian team to the Moscow Olympics. Says organizer Brian Venner: “I had to

go to the palace a couple of times to assure him that he would not be made to look an idiot on television.”

Many of Franco Maria Ricci’s books are worth more than the coffee tables they sit on. Ricci, 42, is Italy’s top designer with clients such as Fiat, Olivetti and Alitalia Airlines, but his true passion is publishing exquisite limitededition books. The latest in his “lost or forgotten” art series is a $150 tribute to free-spirit dancer Isadora Duncan, and Ricci thinks the book is worth every penny. “People don’t criticize an Andy Warhol silk-screen print that costs $10,000,” he says, “but they criticize a book that took a year to produce and costs $150. In Italy, $150 buys a doorknob.”

Canada’s answer to Wayne Newton is 37-year-old Glenn Smith, a blue-eyed charmer from Scarborough, Ontario, who has regularly paired up with Newton in Las Vegas for evenings of “total entertainment.” Smith got his start in the business when the lead singer of a “totally insane” group called Joe King and the Zaniacs heard him sing and guided his career to the neon palaces of Vegas. Since then he has shared billing with the likes of Juliet Prowse and Don Rickies, but Smith himself has yet to make it as a headliner. A record, album in the works could be the break Smith has been looking for and Gladys Knight (without the Pips) has already expressed interest in some of the songs Smith writes. One of the problems that have always plagued Smith is the lack of glitter in his name. “Smith’s a sort of peasant name,” he says. “I should have changed it to something like Lance Sterling.”

Marsha Boulton