People

People

Jane O’Hara February 26 1979
People

People

Jane O’Hara February 26 1979

People

Eighteen months ago, it would have been hard to convince Toronto actress Sarah Torgov that her rising star could be brought down by anything including gravity. At 22, shewon an Etrog best-actress nomination for her performance in the CBC-TV drama Drying Up the Streets (to be aired Feb. 28) and although she didn’t win (Chapelle Jaffee took it for One Night Stand), Torgov was positive her career had been “launched.” Wishful thinking. Apart from shooting a small role in Ivan Reitman’s (Animal House) movie Summer Camp last year, Torgov has been earning her pay by the tray these days, waitressing in a downtown restaurant. In fact, times are so tough that Torgov couldn’t even win a part in a CBC play scripted from her father Morley Torgov’s book A Good Place to Come From. “I auditioned for it,” said Sarah, “but Hollis McLaren (Outrageous) got the part.”

ööfjt’s an anachronism,” said Richard Ü Adams, 58, author of Waterskip Down, a Lord of the Rings with rabbits. “The Canadian seal hunt is like sending little boys up chimneys, stuffing hummingbirds for ladies’ hats and baiting badgers.” As vice-president of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Adams added his weighty two-pence worth last week to the debate over the annual harp seal hunt, which begins next month off the north coast of Newfoundland. Not since Brigitte Bardot jetted onto the ice to pose with a baby seal have the animals had such an ally. Having just completed a North American tour in opposition to the hunt, Adams is contemplating a visit to the ice himself in order to write a novella about the seals’ plight. “I’m not sentimental about animals and I don’t anthropomorphize them except in my books,” said Adams, who then confessed: “If I saw a rabbit eating plants in my garden, I wouldn’t hesitate to shoot it.”

H n his seasonal job as tight end for the H Ottawa Rough Riders of the CFL, Tony Gabriel gets paid for completing assignments, which means running patterns, catching footballs and scoring touchdowns. But since November, Gabriel has been tackling assignments off the gridiron and, so far, he has put more than six points on the board for doing so. In fact, Gabriel has scored two marks of 88 while taking the Canadian Securities Institute correspondence z course which, if all goes according to ^ game plan, will make him a registered | stockbroker with Dominion Securities j Corp. Ltd. by April. Although he has g

three years remaining on his contract with Ottawa, 30-year-old Gabriel isn’t quite so bullish on football anymore and is looking forward to retiring to the money game. “If Ottawa had won the Grey Cup last year, I would have retired then,” said Gabriel, winner of the CFL’s 1978 outstanding player and outstanding Canadian awards. “I’m really looking forward to a career as a broker. Money’s my game.”

gomewhere along the line, actress Kate Nelligan got the idea that life was a niche waiting to be filled—by herself. As a child, growing up in London, Ontario, she wanted to be a tennis player. As a student at Toronto’s York University, she contemplated an academic’s life, “as a mysterious worldly lecturer with simple black dresses and an interesting past.” And now that 27year-old Nelligan is the toast of London’s West End and recent winner of The Evening Standard award as Brit-

ain’s leading actress for her performance in David Hare’s Plenty, she’s ready to move again. Off the boards and onto the silver screen. Nelligan is now filming her first major motion picture role as Lucy Seward in Dracula, alongside Broadway’s Dracula Frank Langella, Laurence Olivier and Donald Pleasence. Following that she plans to take four weeks off and “do the rounds” in Hollywood. “If I want to crack it in films, that’s the way to go,” said Nelligan, in her studied British accent. “I’m no longer interested in spending 20 years in long dresses and becoming an English stage actress.”

n [Ising the political ploy of turning the kHJ monotonous into the momentous, president of the treasury board Judd Buchanan has found a way to make even jogging an enriching experience. Buchanan, 49, runs 20 miles a week on an indoor Ottawa track—that’s 240 laps— with one ear plugged into a tiny tape recorder. What is he listening to? French lessons. Apart from jogging to help fight the battle of the bulge, Buchanan also feels he’s winning the battle for bilingualism. “I’m told,” he said wryly, “that, in French, I’m better speaking off-the-cuff than from a text—just like English.”

lot wanting to wear out his welcome, French architect Roger Taillibert packed up his troubles and made a quick exit from Montreal last week, hours after guiding his leader, Prime

Minister Raymond Barre, around Olympic Park, where his concrete creations graze like a herd of white elephants. Without so much as a by-your-leave, Taillibert managed to skip town and elude the long arm of the Quebec Olympics inquiry chairman, Mr. Justice Albert Malouf, who was waiting to grill the monument builder on his $6.8-million fee for the still unfinished Games stadium. Although Malouf had ordered a subpoena tacked to Taillibert’s hotel room door, the architect flew back to Paris where another embarrassment awaited him. It seems that, due to unusually cold weather in the capital, a set of beams in Taillibert’s Parc des Princes stadium had collapsed, crushing 30 unoccupied seats below. Meanwhile, the temperature was -28°C and Mayor Jean Drapeau was holding his breath.

fj [I gandan President Idi Amin has been viiJ featured and U.S. President Jimmy Carter was last pictured with The Hulk, but Marvel Comics Group has now branched north making Prime Minister

Pierre Trudeau the latest international head of state to make a cameo appearance with the super-heroes. In the April issue of The Uncanny X-Men, subtitled “Chaos in Canada,” Trudeau commands Major Maple Leaf, team leader of the Canadian super-heroes, to retrieve the Canadian-trained agent Wolverine from the grips of the American X-Men. A classic case of the brawn drain. Major Maple Leaf and his band, including Sasquatch and Northstar, pursue Wolverine to Calgary and the chase continues into the May issue, entitled “Shoot-out at the Stampede.” Be advised: this is one time the Canadian super-heroes don’t get their man. Wolverine escapes to the States. “We could develop the Canadian super-heroes into a regular feature, if there’s a great demand,” said Jim Shooter, Marvel’s editor-in-chief. “Apart from that they’ll just pop up occasionally to support our established heroes.” So far, Shooter has attracted at least one interested government party, Norm Cafik, the minister of multiculturalism. “He was worried about it,” admitted Shooter. “He asked for a copy to see what we’d done.”

Jane O’Hara