People

People

Marsha Boulton August 13 1979
People

People

Marsha Boulton August 13 1979

People

When he was in Montreal for a week in July, Ottawa-born crooner Paul Anka packed Place des Arts every night and partied like a true celebrity at the ever-so-elegant Régine’s disco. In Toronto last week, he gave a repeat performance. On opening night, after rendering two hours of sterling showmanship during which he ran through oldies such as Puppy Love and Diana, compositions he has done for Frank Sinatra (My Way) and Tom Jones (She’s a Lady) and lush new material from his album Headlines, Anka was whisked off to a party at a star-grazing disco called

Heaven. There he was feted by 100 old friends and associated hangers-on who presented him with a two-by-three-foot birthday cake which the 38-year-old millionaire took half an hour to carve into chunks. Then it was off to the dance floor where the energetic father of five boogied with Aquitaine Records President Eleanor Sniderman until the wee hours. “It’s so nice to be back in Canada,” he huffed between hustles.

If and when Johnny Carson steps down from his talk-show throne, the most promising heir apparent is another clean-cut Midwesterner named David Letterman, who will be hosting the show eight times this summer. Insiders feel there are only two other potential hosts with a good chance—George Carlin, whose counterculture humor is widely considered “too drug-oriented,” and Martin Mull, whose off-the-wall humor has been branded “too-off-the-wall.” At six-foot-two and 170 pounds, 32-yearold Letterman is a front-runner because his venue is satire, something Carson’s bedtime following has learned to chuckle at between yawns and commercials. As a regular on last year’s Mary Tyler Moore Show Letterman got to show off his talents as a singer, dancer and actor. “I have no desire to repeat

the experience,” he says of his variety excursion and he modestly hedges on the topic of the Tonight Show’s impending vacancy, suggesting that maestro Carson may not vacate the fabled chair. If Letterman does take over the job it will bring Canada into the late-night limelight, since one of his specialties is “vicious denouncements of Canada, its people, its weather and its bacon.” Letterman claims he’s just kidding. He really loves our bacon.

Nicaraguan-born Barbara Carrera, 28, speaks five languages and enjoys box-office clout in London, Paris, Rome, Berlin and Tokyo thanks to pseudo sci-fi movies such as Embryo and The Island of Doctor Moreau. Recently she finished filming in Hawaii on an Irwin Allen doomsday flick, The Day the World Ended. Facing Judgment Day with her is an all-star cast headed up by Towering Inferno survivor Paul Newman and Jacqueline Bisset, veteran of several unintentional disaster movies. The picture should do extremely well in Japan where Carrera’s leg-power is legendary. “The people would say ‘Legs, please, Barbara-san,’ ” she said after a recent visit. “I had to tear all my dresses up the side so they could photograph them.”

Most of French-Canadian gamine Geneviève Bujold’s films have either been restricted to adults or subject to “parental guidance.” But Bujold, 37, won’t suffer from censorial interference when her latest film, The Last Flight of

Noah's Ark, appears next summer. In the honest-to-Disney epic, Bujold plays a prim missionary transporting an agricultural menagerie to an island in the South Seas. Piloting Bujold’s flesh-andfeather-laden B-29 “ark” is another unlikely candidate for kiddies’ matinees, Elliott Gould, who is an only slightly disreputable, definitely paunchy, high-living gambler with a licence to fly—primarily away from bad debts. Of course, the mercy flight runs into complications, the aircraft is forced to land on a deserted isle, Ricky Schroder and Tammy Lauren are discovered stowed away amid the five sheep, six pigs, 20 chickens, two goats, five ducks, two cows and a bull—and then two Japanese soldiers emerge from the jungle thinking that the Second World War is still happening. “This business is, you know, crazy,” sighs Bujold.

You’d think 34-year-old Lilja Kaiser would be content after winning a record-setting $3,000 a month in main-

tenance allowance payments from her estranged husband, Edgar (King Coal) Kaiser Jr., 37, head of Kaiser Resources Ltd. in Vancouver. “There won’t be enough money left over to get even my dresses cleaned,” complained the ashblonde former stewardess who has become accustomed to a lifestyle that Provincial Court Judge Harry Boyle termed “beyond the experience, perhaps even beyond the imagination of the average person.” The judge justified the award by stating that under B.C.’s new Family Relations Act, “the wife is entitled to a familiar standard of living” which, according to Mrs. Kaiser’s petition, meant “living expenses” totalling tens of thou-

sands of dollars and world travel in the corporate jet or one of three family yachts all decorated in the family color-turquoise. Next winter Mrs. Kaiser will try for a permanent divorce settlement of one-third of Kaiser’s shareholdings in the company which are now worth about $25 million. She claims that the work she did with her husband during their five-year union “was harder in a sense than my years as a stewardess.”

In 1974, the song that was inside everyone’s eardrums was a poignant ditty called Seasons in the Sun performed by Vancouver’s Terry Jacks. Though Jacks, 35, retired from the music business in 1976, apparently he thought there was more than three minutes worth of story in the song—a farewell saga from an optimistic dying boy. Transferring his talents from music to film, the tall, curly-haired golden

boy has expanded the backward Love Story-lyric into a 90-minute, made-forTV movie which he is producing and in which he stars. “It’s partly the song’s story, part my own life and part fiction,” says Jacks, who picked former Vogue model Kathy Witt to play the romantic interest. Filming began a few weeks ago in the Queen Charlotte Islands and so far there hasn’t been much of the “joy and fun” Jacks sang into the song. First, the crew was whipped by heavy winds, then one of the boats from which they were filming hit a dolphin and another blew an engine. By the time the weather cleared and the boats were seaworthy, Jacks had to dash into Vancouver for a haircut because in the interim his curls had grown and “the scenes weren’t matching.”

Joe Bottoms wants to become a Canadian citizen. After less than a month in the wilderness of the Ottawa Valley, where he is starring in the movie version of Margaret Atwood’s 1972 novel, Surfacing, the 25-year-old veteran of TV’s Holocaust is hooked: “I was lured to Canada because I wanted a new frontier. In my mind Canada is a new frontier,” says Bottoms, who was born and raised in California but finds Canadian topography more suited to his passion for swimming, canoeing and fishing. On the film set he has become a fixture in the Madawaska River where he fishes for bass before shooting begins and after it finishes. The tousle-haired angler has a way with a rod and fries up his daily catch in his housekeeping cabin, which has made him a popular man with co-stars Kathleen Beller, R.H. Thomson and Margaret Dragu. When the lensing ends, Bottoms may find his adopted country to be less than the outdoors paradise he has envisaged. He plans to settle in Toronto, where sport fishing consists largely of pursuing the elusive High-Liner in supermarket freezers.

Marsha Boulton