Letters

November 17 1980

Letters

November 17 1980

Letters

Give us today our daily constitutional

An Exercise in Failure (Cover, Sept. 22) reveals Trudeau and Davis as strange bedfellows, sharing, as they do, the same old bunk.

ALTON R. DAHLSTROM, ROSSLAND, B.C.

After listening to the bickering provincial premiers at the constitutional conference, one would get the impression that their aim was to splinter our central government into as many fragments as possible. Out here in B.C., I am almost regarded as a traitor because I want a strong central government. But if a real crisis descended upon us, regional schemes would suddenly be forgotten and everyone would scurry for shelter under the strong arm of federalism. The tragedy is that we may all realize it too late.

WILMA MOATS, KELOWNA, B.C.

The recent constitutional conference demonstrated why there must remain in Canada one senior level of government. This becomes obvious when the poor performances of the majority of the 10 provincial premiers are considered. Their general attitude was to gang up on Trudeau and try and gain more provincial power regardless of whether or not such power would benefit Canada as a whole. I am convinced that, if anything, the power of the provinces should be decreased and the federal government’s increased. This letter may not please the premiers, but their attitude didn’t please Canadians.

G.M. PRICE, MONCTON, N.B.

In the discussion of off-shore resources in your issue dealing with the constitution, I wish to make the following points: I’m not aware that Mr. Trudeau offered what he said would be oil revenues equivalent to Alberta’s. What the federal government has “offered” is that “off-shore resources” would be owned by the federal government and the province would get “significant revenues,” much less than we would receive if the provinces owned their off-shore oil and gas in the same way as Alberta owns its oil and gas. There is no provincial power as it relates to “control” of the rate and kind of development in the federal proposal. A substantial rural

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fishing society must have power in this vital area, otherwise its delicate social fabric could be destroyed. Finally, the federal government has indicated that somehow, when and if (don’t hold your breath) we in Newfoundland become “have,” we will be treated differently (different federal-provincial revenuesharing—less for the province) than other “have” provinces are treated. I feel your article did not do justice to Newfoundland’s position.

A. BRIAN PECKFORD, PREMIER, NFLD.

Not written in cement

We were surprised to see included in the article Occupational Death (Health, May 19) a photograph, presumably taken in a cement manufacturing plant, captioned “dust-filled cement plant: daily danger.” We refute the assertion that dust exposures in cement manufacturing plants represent “daily danger.” Information about health and safety has been provided to the Portland Ce-

ment Association, during its 64 years of existence, by its member companies in both Canada and the United States; and we are not aware of any evidence that indicates that cement plant workers are exposed to “daily danger” due to dusts in this work environment. We believe that the editor’s cutline reference to “daily danger” in cement plants is unfounded and misleading.

LANCE C. DECORY, PRESIDENT, CANADIAN PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION, TORONTO

Hear ye, hear ye ...

In your article Festival of Festivals (People, Sept. 22), I am incorrectly quoted as saying that “jobs at any cost are all the province is interested in, not in helping Canadians get a major share of the movies made with Canadian money.” This quote was not only lifted from Sid Adilman’s column in the Toronto Star, but wrongly attributed to me instead of to a “festival organizer.”

DUNCAN M. ALLAN, ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER, INDUSTRY AND TOURISM, TORONTO

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Crossed channels

I feel obligated to correct misinformation in your article Ethnic TV Alters Its Accent (Media, Oct. 6). For example: MTV Channel 47 increased its programming this season by 56 hours weekly. The $1.2 million that the article said we “ploughed” exclusively into our new All-Night Show in fact was the increase in our over-all programming budget. Of the 56 additional hours, 28 hours are in our daytime schedule and devoted in part to programming in six new languages. On any given day, MTV Channel 47 deals with more social issues of concern to immigrants than all other outlets combined. We even feature dramatized situations that teach viewers how to cope with true-to-life experiences while learning English at the same time. Ours is truly community programming, without precedence anywhere.

GEORGE GARLOCK, PROMOTION AND PUBLICITY MANAGER, MULTILINGUAL TELEVISION, TORONTO

A way with words

Barbara Amiel, in her column Banning the Word ‘Stewardess' Will Not Win Women Equality (Sept. 8), states that the CBC “has been captured by feminists bent on wiping out all distinctions between men and women.” Quotes she gives of a recent CBC policy guidance include “substitute neutral words and phrases for ‘man-words.’ ” I wonder how the CBC proposes to deal with workmanship, manslaughter, mandate, man-the-boats, mastermind and so on?

H.H. WATSON, NEPEAN, ONT.

Oh dear, oh dear. What can one say about Barbara Amiel? I understand her appeal. There are always people who will support their own degradation and they will always be popular with those who are doing the degrading, but this cannot in any way be termed ‘artistic integrity.’ Artists have a responsibility to point the way to new and better things, not to celebrate old and worse ones.

FIONA C. SIM, TORONTO

Barbara Amiel goes out of her way to try to make the CBC’s new policy guidelines on the portrayal of women seem like the work of a lunatic pressure group when I’m sure she must be aware that they are aimed at such all-too-common occurrences as the male candidates for office being referred to as “the distinguished U of T graduate and former alderman,” while the female candidate beside him is called “the petite, attractive mother of five.” Wake up, Barbara; join the 20th century.

ANNA SCOTT, WILLIAMSFORD, ONT.