People

Marsha Boulton November 24 1980

People

Marsha Boulton November 24 1980

People

"Ising anything left of punk rock. That's what my bag is and, besides, I don’t like purple hair,” says Vancouver’s Susan Jacks, whose latest album, Ghosts, is so middle of the road that you can practically hear the white line. Jacks found early fame with former husband, Terry Jacks, and together formed The Poppy Family, sweeping the airwaves in the early ’70s with such classics as Which Way You Goin', Billy and Where Evil Grows. Today both Jacks have remarried, and former B.C. Lion and Saskatchewan Roughrider football star Ted Dushinski finds himself managing his wife’s career, while ex-husband Jacks produces her records. “He knows what he can get out of her,” says the 13-year gridiron veteran. “I don’t necessarily agree. But let’s face it, after football I thought my career was in sporting goods.”

The word “possession” runs like a leitmotiv in the short but tumultuous life of Linda Blair. Since chilling the hearts of millions with her portrayal of a demonized child in The Exorcist, she graduated to characters who succumbed to drugs and men. Her personal life often imitated the roles she played: she is currently on a three-year probation for conspiring to possess cocaine and admits to having lived on and off with various musicians since the age of 15. Most recently, Blair possesses the hopes of a group of Washington, D.C., businessmen who are staking $1 million to put Blair’s Gothic talents to work in a new horror movie—Hell Night. With a confident giggle, Blair says that the film—which pits her against a monster in a haunted house—“will scare everyone to death.” Although she was chosen for the role because of her “vulnerability” and her past successes as a first-class victim, Blair is, in fact, anything but. “I have done just about everything in my life,” she admits. “I feel more like 35 than 21. I’m hardly the girl next door, you know.”

Police insist it was only a common burglary, but the quiet of Edmonton’s ritzy Ravine Drive was shattered last week as patrol cars and media swarmed around the home of Premier Peter Lougheed. Returning home from a downtown party policy meeting, the man holding the key to the $6.4-billion Heritage Fund found the back door of his house had been forced open and culprits had made off with a small amount of Jeanne Lougheed’s jewelry and the family silverware.

been called Citizen of the Year, Telephone City’s Goodwill Ambassador, Admiral of the Creek and Dean of the Council. If they want to make me Chief Ribbon-Cutter, I have no objections,” announced re-elected Brantford, Ont., Alderman Charlie Ward, 89, whose service on city council spans 28 years, which is a record in Canada. Now Ward’s services have been requested for the rubber chicken and satin-snipping circuit by Mayor-elect Dave Neumann, who says he will be too busy in council to attend most functions. Ward, whose qualifications include a 1956 garden party at Buckingham Palace, feels confident that he will be able to fulfil the new mayor’s request. Two weeks ago council finally approved funds for his pet project—the cleaning up of a polluted creek that annually threatened the basements of his electorate during spring flooding. “You know what the word ‘Ward’ meant in ancient times, don’t you?” asks the town’s new ceremonial chief. “‘Ward’ stands for Defender of the Weak, and that’s what I’m here for.”

maximization of long-term profits is why God hath put man on earth,” quoth Toronto actor John Jarvis II, but the words are only part of his characterization of Canadian business crown prince Conrad Black. Jarvis, 25, portrays Black in a Theatre Passe Muraille send-up of the Upper Canada College tie set, Torontonians, which opened last week. “Black fascinates me. He’s a kind of Napoleonic hero—the prince of business who is despised and admired at once,” says Jarvis, who himself hails from the “establishment” as the greatgreat-great grandnephew of Samuel Peters Jarvis, who lends his name to the infamous street. “My father wanted me out of town, but in the scheme of things I should have attended Upper Canada College,” admits Jarvis, who attended Prince Andrew’s alma mater, Lakefield College School near Peterborough, Ont. Despite Jarvis’ family ties and his admiration of Black’s “moxie,” the man from Argus Corporation Ltd. declined an invitation to attend the openingnight performance.

íflthink a writer is out of touch if Iwhat he writes does not bring abuse,” says American epic author James Michener, preparing himself for the critics’ response to his 896-page South African novel, The Covenant. Although reviewers panned his previous mammoth work, Chesapeake, as much for its length as its content—“Don’t read it and don’t drop it on your foot,” cautioned one—Michener, at 73, has no doubts about his ability. “I’m very good,” he immodestly admits. The longwinded introductions to his books, he explains, are written on purpose “to weed out the amateur readers.” The millions who read on, devouring such best sellers as Hawaii and Centennial, send Michener a steady stream of letters complaining of just one thing: “Your book was so short.”

Scarcely a week after giving birth to The Winnipeg Sun and providing unemployed Tribune journalists with a new home, businessman-publisher Tom Denton, 46, has created a home of another kind. Billing it “the home of the stars,” Denton has opened the Stage West Dinner Theatre modelled on similar operations in Edmonton and Regina.

For $20, customers get a gourmet buffet and 2V2 hours of Nebraska-whine from Sandy Dennis, starring in Bernard Slade’s hit Same Time, Next Year opposite Canadian actor Ted Follows. Entrepreneur Denton—who worked on the student newspaper at Acadia University and acted the part of Henry IV there 25 years ago—is delighted with the response to both his new ventures, though somewhat exhausted. “What with putting a paper to bed three nights a week and starting a dinner theatre at the same time, my learning curve is a vertical line right now.”

When First Lady-elect Nancy Reagan arrives in Washington, the White House will be in for a major change in style. The folksy little tea parties Rosalynn Carter held for “ordinary folks” from around the country will be out. Elegant parties, gala dinners and cocktail receptions will be in. “The White House should be put up on a hill, in people’s minds, in a philosophical sense,” she said last week. But one person the fashion-conscious Reagan—Adolfo is her favorite designer—may not have around the White House very much is Barbara Bush, wife of Vice-Presidentelect George Bush. Fifty-five-year-old Bush has a great garland of white hair and a heavily lined weather-beaten face. She looks much older than her years and freely admits that during the campaign she was often mistaken for her husband’s mother. “I know that I look older than Nancy even though I’m really two years younger,” she says. Well, Bush is in for a shock. Last week, The Washington Post reported that Nancy Reagan has been lying about her age for more than 30 years. Though she insists that she was born on July 6,1923, the Post checked with Reagan’s alma mater, Smith College, and found their records show her birth date as July 6, 1921.

At 46, actress-singer-dancer Shirley MacLaine appears to be putting no brakes on her career. So far this year she has been seen in the mixed ménage film Loving Couples and next month she is teamed up with Bo Derek in Change of Seasons. Both films concern married women who wander outside of their conjugal arrangements. “I can relate to those women. At least they weren’t as hard as all the hookers I’ve done,” says MacLaine, who won an Academy Award nomination for her streetwalking role in Irma La Douce 17 years ago. In fact, MacLaine seems to be able to relate to anything that has to do with herself. “I think I have a very cute, mobile face. I much prefer watching me on screen than any of the other actors. When I’m not there, I can’t wait for me to come back on screen. When I’m not there, I’m bored.” Edited by Marsha Boulton