Letters

November 3 1980

Letters

November 3 1980

Letters

In a class of their own

I really enjoyed your article on the Edmonton Eskimos (Football Dynasty on the March, Cover, Sept. 8). They are truly in a class of their own. The part on Dave Cutler was superb. I especially liked the photo of him kicking with Wilkie holding.

ESMOND SHONG, VICTORIA, B.C.

I read with interest your article on Canadian football. My friends and I gained a lot of insight into the world of your CFL. We have often queried the differences between professional football in the United States and Canada. I can see why so many of our American football players have heeded the cry, “Come north young man.”

LEN BATTAGLIA, CHICAGO, ILL.

Dare to stand together

Congratulations and best wishes to Maclean's for reaching its 75th birthday. Your magazine has been a regular visitor to my home for more than 50 years and is a great help in keeping up with the Canadian scene. One of the best articles yet is Ed Finn’s Let 's Take Tripartism Out of the Closet (Podium, Sept. 29). He deserves our thanks for his solid, straightforward treatment of the senseless battle between management and labor.

A. MACPHERSON, PORT CREDIT, ONT.

It was certainly refreshing to read Ed Finn’s article in which he advocated labor-management-government co-operation (tripartism) as a means of replacing the adversary system in collective

bargaining. It must have taken considerable courage to have publicly promoted such a stance. However, until government treats labor with the same respect and consideration as it does big business, that goal will be very difficult to realize.

WILFRED HARRIGAN, LACHINE, QUE.

Your recent article written by Ed Finn seems to this uninformed reader the most enlightening single page he has ever encountered on that subject.

WILLIAM E. TAYLOR JR., OTTAWA

Setting the record straight

No one could fail to be moved by the tragic circumstances surrounding the recent passing of Lillian Hess. Contrary to what your article The Case of the

Woman Who Was Too Rich to Die (Canada, July 21) tended to suggest, however, self-neglect has nothing whatever to do with Christian Science. Miss Hess’s withdrawal from regular attendance at a Christian Science church, and from most of her earlier church acquaintances, had begun a number of years before her death. All aid offered by these friends was rejected. She seemed either unable or unwilling to accept help from any source, either medical aid or the help of a Christian Science practitioner.

J. DON FULTON, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATION FOR ONTARIO, TORONTO

Only in Russia, you say?

Every article that I read about life in the Soviet Union contains the same message of individual frustration and impotence in the face of a harsh, overpowering and totally impersonal bureaucracy which seems concerned only with its own self-perpetuation (Anatomy of a Soviet Defection, Q & A, Sept. 8). The really terrifying thing is how much stories such as these remind me of one’s daily existence within the confines of the federal civil service.

JOHN MUIRHEAD, MEDICINE HAT, ALTA.

On July 2, 1979, this magazine, in an editorial by Peter C. Newman, published certain comments on the Smallwood era in Newfoundland. In the article, Mr. Newman intimated that Mr. Smallwood informed him some years ago that a highway contractor had given him his swimming pool on Roache’s Line and also that he, Mr. Smallwood, had during the 1965 federal election, through “his cronies,” contravened the Election Act by adding the names of long-dead relatives to voters lists. Mr. Newman and Maclean's have been made aware that Mr. Smallwood vehemently denies such allegations. We regret any embarrassment caused Mr. Smallwood by what was obviously intended to be a lighthearted and amusing political commentary.

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply their full name and address, and mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, 1+81 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M5W1A7.

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All talk, no action

Your article on peace researcher Norman Alcock shows Canadians are like people everywhere (The Search for Peace in a World of War, Profile, Sept. 15). We talk peace but don’t support it with money and action. Instead of squabbling over our wealth, let’s set our sights on becoming No. 1 in the search for peace and justice throughout the world. ROSS SMYTH, MONTREAL

In the know

What a delight it was to read your article A Voice Out of Time (Books, Sept. 22) on Professor Hugh MacLennan, his ideals and achievements. To me he is one of the few Canadian men or women who, like John Fisher, know all about Canada. DR. CRAWFORD ROSE,

AURORA, ONT.

Ignorance is bliss

It is nice of Maclean's to have printed Russell Doern’s article Stereotypes Aren 't for Real (Podium, Oct. 6). Only pity is, it won’t help. I consider it as rather simpleminded, useless, boring and just another stereotyping, so to speak, to again try to enumerate harassments suffered by Canadians of German descent, to point out once more that not all Germans were Nazis, and then give a long list of names of great Germans plus their contributions to the culture of the world. Intelligent, educated people know all that—and the others won’t give a damn—and those are the discriminating ones. Of course, these endless discriminations are annoying, but the wise attitude is to simply take them as what they are: stupidity. After all, one should know who one is and be above such silly attitudes rather than stoop down to be offended.

J.K. BACHER, ST. LAMBERT, QUE.

Mr. Doern protests too much and gives himself away in his first sentence. Any third-generation resident of this country still calling himself a something Canadian deserves all the stereotyping he gets. J.B. KELLY, OTTAWA

I would like to express my congratulations to Russell Doern. As a Germanborn Canadian I am much exposed to the almost daily subtle harassment bred by long and frequent exposure to Hollywood’s version of Germans and Germany. However, I must say, and not without pride, that most of my Canadian fellow citizens have more common sense than to adopt a view portrayed through third-class literature and motion pictures.

HORST W. PFAUS, NEPEAN, ONT.