PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON December 15 1980
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON December 15 1980

PEOPLE

Both Carrie and The Fury were horror films, but I didn’t make a conscious effort to make my debut with them. I’m not a horror fan at all,” says Amy Irving, 27, who transcended being grabbed by Carrie’s earth-covered hand to portray a deaf teacher in Voices and a Willie Nelson groupie in Honeysuckle Rose. This month, Irving can be seen in a truly mould-breaking role as a concert pianist fighting for centre keyboard with Richard Dreyfuss in The Competition. In her next role, however, Irving may rejoin the ranks of such “virgins of menace” as Jamie Lee Curtis and Nancy Allen. In Canada, she has been talking to producer Jon Slan about a project. The working title is Tiptoes and it’s about midgets and dwarfs.

This year’s Academy Awards are shaping up to be a Canadian affair. So far, Jack Lemmon’s tour de force performance in the Canadian-made film version of St. Catharines, Ont.-born Bernard Slade’s Tribute is being highly touted for the Best Actor Oscar, with five or six other nominations expected. The biggest Canadian coup, however, is that award-winning director Norman Jewison has agreed to produce the ceremonies, following in the footsteps of Jack Haley Jr. and William Friedkin. “It’s like driving a car off a cliff, because anything can happen,” explains Jewison, who will not be paid for his efforts. The last live television show Jewison directed was a Judy Garland special in 1959, and he is looking forward to the action. “After all, the only other TV show that’s this ‘live’ is the Super Bowl.”

I still say I’m the best salesman I know,” claims former Conservative and former Liberal cabinet minister Jack Horner. Having failed twice to sell himself to Tory Albertan voters, after 21 years in Parliament the Pollockville rancher has taken to selling his political memoirs, My Own Brand, and telling stories that didn’t make it between the covers. “They say there are three things which can get a politician: poker, booze and women,” he says, “but boredom is the worst. I was so frustrated in the early ’70s that I started to sell suits in my office.” With catalogues from a Montreal dealer and his own measuring tape, he would peddle the threads on Parliament Hill. “I think I sold about 17, but I didn’t make any money.”

Ihave never forgotten the voice of the man I heard singing to his child in the hospital 15 years ago,” says Ottawa singer and children’s storyteller Suzanne Pinel. Much later she discovered the voice belonged to present Transport Minister Jean-Luc Pepin, who makes his singing debut on Pinel’s sec-

ond album, Une girafe à l’école. Pepin, 56, sings a grandfather’s lullaby in a tale about a rocking chair that starts to talk. “We had to tell him to make his voice more shaky,” explains Pinel. “He has such a young-sounding voice.”

After Ernest Borgnine, 63, won an

Oscar for Marty, his first leading role where he played an ugly butcher, he became one of the least likely leading actors on record. With his ferocious frown and chilling teeth he played sloblike heavies in westerns and Sergeant Fatso in From Here to Eternity. But Borgnine’s career began in the theatre and, after 30 years in movies, he is returning to it in a one-man show slated for Broadway, Mafioso. “It’s a comedydrama dissertation on life in the United States,” explains Borgnine. “I play a fictional Mafia character, Salvatore Bontempo, as well as the roles of Bontempo’s son and father.” To help him memorize his lines, Borgnine will have a doctor hypnotize him—a first for him. “You know,” reflects the actor, “it’s proven that we use only one-eighth of our brain. Maybe the good doctor will help me to use at least one-half of mine.”

Congress is a world of thirsts that can’t be quenched. The drug habits, the drinking problems, the mistresses, the boy-friends, the broken homes attest to that,” says Rita Jenrette, a 30-year-old former model who gained some insights into the congressional pitfalls as the wife of South Carolina Congressman John Jenrette. In a Washington Post magazimstory titled The Diary of a Mad Congresswife, Jenrette conducts a personal exposé of the difficulties that accompany political office. “Every congressional wife learns there is something about a congressman that brings women out of the woodwork. If he’s young, handsome and flirtatious, trained attack dogs won’t be able to keep them away. I know, I tried.” Jenrette says she “knew the honeymoon was over” when her husband failed to ruffle the sheets one night and she found him “drunk, undressed and lying on the floor in the arms of a woman who I knew was old enough to be his mother.” These revelations may be of small solace to Jenrette’s husband, who is currently appealing a bribery and conspiracy conviction in the Abscam scandal, and was found guilty of violating the House of Representatives’ code of ethics last week. However, Washington insiders speculate that the congresswife’s article, and a potential picture spread for Playboy, may be part of a valiant attempt to raise the money to pay for her husband’s appeal.

The band played Hold That Tiger, but the mood was more Get That Lyon, last weekend when Manitoba’s Liberal party filled a 31-month-old leadership void with United Church minister Doug Lauchlan. The party, which holds only one seat provincially, had been leaderless since Charles Huband quit and became a Manitoba Court of Appeal judge. As he accepted the $36,500-a-year job before such Liberal worthies as Employment Minister Lloyd Axworthy, Izzie Asper, Senator Gil Molgat and MP Bob Bockstael, Lauchlan attacked Premier Sterling Lyon’s obeisance to Alberta, suggesting the Manitoba symbol be changed from a buffalo to a trade mark similar to RCA Victor’s, “with Sterling listening to the Peterphone” instead of a Victrola. Fighting

words, perhaps, but Lauchlan will have to find himself a seat in the legislature before he can enter the foray meaningfully. His home is in Wolseley, the constituency held by turfed Tory MLA Bob Wilson, who was recently sentenced to seven years in jail for conspiring to import marijuana. While Wilson awaits his appeal, Liberal sages are searching the rules to see whether a member can simultaneously hold office and serve time.

It’s the caterpillar and butterfly syndrome. I had gone as far as I could as the caterpillar Andy Kim, and something new, like a butterfly, had to evolve,” says the new Baron Longfellow, who, as singer Kim, rocked the charts a few years ago with Sugar, Sugar and Rock Me Gently. Then at the peak of his

career, he stopped performing and went into a cocoon in his L.A. apartment until emerging this year with a new name and a second-debut album. The name was the suggestion of agent Gordon

Mills, the man credited with christening Tom Jones and Engelbert Humperdinck.

“I even looked in one of those babynames books and found out that it was all right to call someone Baron,” says Longfellow. “Of course, my mother in Montreal will always call me Andre.”

On the set of Swedish siren-turneddirector Mai Zetterling’s offering in the Canadian women’s anthology film Love, the most often-asked question may well have been: “Is it a man? Is it a woman? Or is it Superfly?” In fact, the creature most resembling Richard

Pryor in party gear was otherwise blonde and white Joni Mitchell, who donned black face and stovepipe pants to capture the persona of her character—a Halloween pimp. “They wanted me to write the music, but I had this screenplay idea going,” says Mitchell, who wrote the 15-minute segment after she selected the music, an odd combination of cool Miles Davis and kinky Devo. In the future, Mitchell says she plans to direct, rather than act. More traditional fans can view her jazz-bent singing on a CBC special in February in which she performs as herself, live and in concert. MARSHA BOULTON