Letters

A capital offence

February 18 1980
Letters

A capital offence

February 18 1980

A capital offence

Letters

Please be informed of the gross error made in your article Brezhnev's Gamble (Jan. 21). Vilnius, not Kaliningrad, is the capital of Lithuania. Kaliningrad (Königsberg) is a city in East Prussia and has never been the capital of Lithuania.

RAMONA GRIGALIUNAS,

THE TORONTO LITHUANIAN

HOUSE YOUTH ORGANIZATION, TORONTO ¿

I wish to congratulate Maclean's on your exceptionally fine cover story on Brezhnev. It was written with great insight and with a prophetic quality for the future.

E. KONOPACKI, OTTAWA

The game of the name

I was delighted to see myself quoted in your article A Chill Wind Blows No Trust (Jan. 21). However, having briefly achieved such heights of national prominence, I was disappointed to see that my name was misspelled.

ROBERT MCMURRICH, HAMILTON, ONT.

Paved with good intentions

Accolades to Anita Latner for her article Medics for the Fitness Generation (Jan. 14). Speaking as a physiotherapist interested in the growing field of sports medicine, I cannot emphasize enough how important sports medicine centres and their role in preventive medicine can be. An incredible mass of people are jumping on the fitness bandwagon only to drop off because of injuries sustained through ignorance of proper conditioning and training techniques. Joggers are especially prone to various “overuse

syndromes” which many physicians are not trained to recognize or treat.

SUSAN JACOBSEN, WINNIPEG

Doctor’s orders

In his article ‘Science' Should Start With an R (Jan. 21), Dr. David Suzuki said how keen he is to jettison “illiterate” cargo from the futureship of scientific knowledge. But why does he then continue to misappropriate such an arbitrary and offensive a tag as “mongolism” when referring to the medically termed Down’s Syndrome?

HIROKO FUDEMOTO, OTTAWA

Breath of a salesman

I thought Val Ross’s article on smoking was very enjoyable (Manners Going Up in Smoke, Jan. 21). I read it in Ben’s delicatessen with my after-lunch cigarette. Unfortunately Val Ross left out one very important point about nonsmokers, which was made by a Montreal sports columnist: nonsmokers have bad breath.

GEOFFREY MOORE, MONTREAL

On an airplane, for instance, I would rather sit beside a smoker than: a bore; a drunk; Gordon Lightfoot’s guitar; a screaming kid; a weak bladder in the inside seat; a nose picker; anyone who checks for the barf bag before he even buckles his seat belt; a terrorist... just to name a few.

PETER TAYLOR, TORONTO

I read with great interest your article on smoking habits. I personally feel that the government does not discourage smoking enough. I feel their first priority should be with our schoolchildren, by using vigorous anti-smoking campaigns in the classroom.

R. HUCL, OTTAWA

The fame of the lord

Congratulations to Anthony Whittingham for the article Lord of the Globe (Jan. 21) concerning the take-over of The Globe and Mail and its fellow FP newspapers by the Thomson chain. It is the first honest evaluation I have seen and, having recently moved from Charlottetown, we can attest to what happens when the only local newspapers to be had are Thomson ones: circulation of out-of-town newspapers rises considerably. Your statement that the Thomson group “has a persistent, if perhaps unfair, reputation for sluggish, lacklustre newspaper quality” is too kind in its criticism. We feel that such newspaper coverage of many national and international events leads to the intellectual atrophy of the area it serves and the inhabitants there. Heaven help the Canadian intellect if this Thomson mentality permeates its new acquisitions.

DR. AND MRS. DANIEL STEVELMAN, LONDON, ONT.

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply their full name and address, and mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, 1+81 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M5W1A7.

Subscribers’ Moving Notice

Send correspondence to: Maclean s, Box 1600, Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W 2B8

ATTACH OLD ADDRESS LABEL HERE AND MAIL IMMEDIATELY!

I also subscribe to ( ) Chatelaine and/or ( ) FLARE and enclose old address labels from those magazines as well.

To your health ...

Congratulations on your article by Sidney Katz, Health in the ’80s (Jan. 7). However, I suspect that the 90 per cent of people suffering the common complaints listed are largely suffering from simple malnutrition brought on by our modern chemicalized, refined, sterilized, devitalized synthetic-and-sugarladen food. I also suspect that when all professionals in the health field are required to take advanced classes in nutrition (which are not sponsored by the chemical companies) and when the first thing a doctor asks of his patients is a rundown of their regular diet, then the astronomically rising health-care costs will begin to drop correspondingly.

JOSEPHINE KEHOE, NIPAWIN, SASK.

What a pity that Sidney Katz’s article, Health in the 80s, was a rehash of the arguments of the “doctor bashers.” The article presented, in my opinion, halftruths, unproven hypotheses and blatant distortions as if they were Holy Grail. For instance, Katz implied that surgeons make $500 every time they operate. The vast majority of operations carry a fee a long way below this figure. He does not tell us how the “new doctor” is going to rid the patient of his or her abusive spouse, dictatorial boss and money worries. Any treatment of stress will only have temporary benefits without removal of the cause. With all the exciting developments possible in the ’80s the readers of Maclean’s deserved something better than political diatribe.

C.F. WALLACE, M.B., B.S., CALLANDER, ONT.

In his analysis of the health-care needs of the ’80s Sidney Katz omitted the solution that is available now but being underused—occupational therapy. Occupational therapists are now equipped to help people to analyse the causes of stress or decreased function in their life and to help them plan and carry out active programs to enable them to solve such problems, ideally before serious illness results. Unfortunately services of occupational therapists are frequently unavailable or restricted to traditional health-care facilities where their clients are those who have already succumbed to accident or disease. I would like to argue that wider use of occupational therapists’ services would reduce the impact of stress and lifestyle-related disease and trauma and subsequently reduce health-care costs.

BARBARA J. O’SHEA, KINGSTON, ONT.