Letters

If it’s Tuesday this is Kansas

March 10 1980
Letters

If it’s Tuesday this is Kansas

March 10 1980

If it’s Tuesday this is Kansas

Letters

While you were reporting on Ralph Nader’s criticisms of the Law School Admissions Test and other tests {Multiple-Choice Anxiety ,Feb. 4), you might well have considered whether Canadians don’t have even more reason for suspicion of them than Americans do. Why do Canadian universities pay any attention to a test so narrowly designed for United States use that, for example, test monitors presiding over my LSAT in 1978 were explicitly forbidden to tell test-takers what to put in the line labelled “state and zip code” on the test’s identification form—even if those testtakers happen to live in a province instead of a state and there’s nowhere to write in the word “Canada?”

CHRIS REDMOND, WATERLOO, ONT.

Our man in Grenada

I hasten to register my protest against William Lowther’s article An Eye for Cuban Arms (Dec. 31). Everyone is entitled to their own prejudices, especially where socialism is involved, but beyond that I think he is unfair and untrue. I am a United Church minister from Alberta working in Grenada. As such, I drive around the island every week, picking up passengers and learning from them their attitudes toward the government. The coup was very popular as an end to a corrupt and brutal regime, and the nation would love to have [former prime minister Sir EricjGairy back to face trial. There have since been disappointments and changes of attitude, and there are concerns about the future. But the revolution is still strong

and has the support of the church, especially the Roman Catholics. The social problems are enormous and will not change quickly under anyone’s direction. This is a friendly and beautiful nation and a highly important sample of struggle for development. Canada should be close to it, making wise and useful investments and gifts and contributing our own best insights into the rebuilding of this nation.

GERALD M. HUTCHINSON, GRENADA, WEST INDIES

Gamesmanship

As Peter C. Newman said in his editorial Let's Hold the Olympics— But in Some Other Ball Park (Feb. 4), “for Canada to carry the Olympic banner into the Soviet Union at this time would be hypocrisy.” But what is the alternative except to boycott them? I think we should boycott them and deflate the Politburo’s pride and ego and leave it up to the Soviet public to ask why or where are the U.S.A., Canada and other countries.

COLIN H. DONALDSON, VANCOUVER

May I commend Peter C. Newman on his fine editorial. Of everything Pve read relating to the Soviets’ behavior in Afghanistan, his defence of the proposition that the Olympics should be moved to another venue in 1980 is the most cogent and clearly reasoned proposition to date. I trust that his views so forthrightly expressed will gain the wide attention of the Canadian community and have a telling effect upon the final policy of the Canadian government in this matter.

DOUG MOFFAT, VANCOUVER

Boycotting the Olympics will only develop a fortress mentality in the Soviet

Union. Some 300,000 foreign visitors in Moscow making personal contacts with Russian citizens would have more effect on Soviet policies, I should think. Or does the West prefer the arms race?

ROSS SMYTH, MONTREAL

The rapes of wrath

Having just finished Bill MacVicar’s review of the movie A Scream From Silence {The Hostile Tribes of Men and Women, Feb. 11), we are forced to wonder where Maclean's digs up its film reviewers. To call Lina Wertmiiller’s work “high-minded trash” displays, in our minds, the most arrogant sort of

artistic ignorance. His analysis of Anne Claire Poirier’s film is both archaic and chauvinistic. How can turning rape into a “unique and burdening sorrow known only to womankind” be romanticizing and glorifying? Does he suppose that the director’s purpose was to illustrate how fortunate females are in their capacity to be violated? In his attempt to appear knowledgeable and insightful, Bill MacVicar comes across only as shallow and pretentious.

ADAM CARUSO, SALLY COCKBURN, ONNO OERLEMANS, KINGSTON, ONT.

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Emetic surgery

I read with shock and a growing sense of sickness Peter C. Newman’s editorial We Can Cloak-and-Dagger With the Best of Them (Feb. 11). Are Canadians all such insecure, beaten people that we must ride on the coattails of Kenneth Taylor and company in order to “walk tall basking in the borrowed glory?” I cannot believe that we have such a naïve, knee-jerk reaction to such incidents. Certainly, the Canadian diplomats in Iran acted with humanity, compassion and courage; but in fact they

had little choice. Consider the repercussions if Taylor and his people had turned over the six Americans to the Iranians?

TIMOTHY DEAN, VANCOUVER

The sins of the father...

The Grand Manan Ferry Service referred to in your article The Acquired Taste of Island Life (Jan. 28) is operated by Coastal Transport Limited of Saint John, N.B., not CN. Coastal Transport Limited is a subsidiary of CN Marine, which operates the Grand Manan Ser-

vice at whatever rate and frequency levels are set by the province of New Brunswick. The province determines the service levels because it also pays the difference between the actual cost of providing the service and revenue from passengers, freight customers and federal contributions.

G. L. GRAHAM, MANAGER, COASTAL TRANSPORT LIMITED, SAINT JOHN, N.B.

Early risers

In your article on CUSO/SUCO: All's Quiet on the Overseas Front (Feb. 11), you mentioned a resolution passed by CUSO’s francophone sister organization, SUCO, about political prisoners in Quebec. In fact, the “resolution” was passed in the fall of 1978, not January, 1980. It was passed at SUCO’s annual general meeting, which is made up of volunteer workers from around the province of Quebec, and did not represent the views of the board of directors of CUSO/SUCO, nor its staff. CUSO/SUCO’s continuing work in over 50 Third World countries, our project support and the 850 Canadians working in our programs are testimony to the continuing strength and maturity of the organization.

IAN SMILLIE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CUSO/SUCO, OTTAWA

Observation gallery

I must compliment Lawrence O’Toole on his article More Than Just a Gigolo (Feb. 4). I read his review of American Gigolo the day after I saw the movie and it confirmed what reams of his reviews have been leading me to believe: his criticism can be taken seriously. He does not give voice to his ego, he does not give away the story and he does not shroud his opinion in Fotheringham superfluousness. His social comment and intelligent observation are a refreshing change from the usual critics’ drivel.

LAURA WERSHLER, CALGARY

The patience of Job

In your article Not All Roads Lead to Rome (Feb. 4), Hubert de Santana shows, as usual, his anti-Catholic bias by not pointing out that the church is mainly seeking to prevent Hans Kiing from teaching in an official capacity and in the name of the church, his own theology. I, like many millions of Catholics, have been outraged by Kiing’s actions in doing this for over four years. No one questions his right to his own beliefs but his refusal to go to Rome to explain, as a teaching theologian, his position smacks of either cowardice or ignorance. How much patience is the church expected to have?

H. R. CARVALHO, RICHMOND, B.C.