Letters

The diplomatic niceties

March 3 1980
Letters

The diplomatic niceties

March 3 1980

The diplomatic niceties

Letters

I’m writing to your magazine in order to thank any Canadian who may read this for the brave rescue of the six American diplomats from Tehran (The Great Escape, Feb. 11). I feel that not only the United States but the world owes Canada a debt of honor and gratitude: in these sad times, we need all the examples we can get.

JOHN D. ERICKSON, SEATTLE, WASH.

I wish to thank the people of Canada and your government for the help they gave in freeing six Americans from our embassy in Tehran. While many Americans feel the whole Iranian affair has been overexposed, your actions were doubly appreciated. Not only for the act but for the goodwill shown. We needed it.

EUGENE HUBBARD, HUDSONVILLE, MICH.

Tragic flaws

I find it ironic for a magazine such as yours to ask Where Have All the Leaders Gone? (Jan. 28) when in reality the news media have ridiculed and crucified all our past leaders who have shown many, if not all, the virtues outlined in your editorial. This apparent flaw whereby broadcasters and reporters see fit to interpret rather than report the news has resulted in potentially good leaders becoming mediocre and prospective heavies from entering leadership races.

C.K. BURLINGHAM, SASKATOON

Brotherly love

I would like to comment on your article Reclaiming the Rank and File (Jan. 14). I appreciate the fact that you recognized the significance of this development and gave it publicity. However, I want to state clearly for the record that we will have a continuing relationship with the international union; we will be proud to do so and we have been proud of our past association. We have worked very well together and have helped each other immensely. I also want to make it abundantly clear that nothing we did in Canada was with an idea of revenge. The Canadian and U.S. membership recognize that we live in two countries which share a continent. We simply want to build a more effective labor movement.

C. NEIL REIMER, NATIONAL DIRECTOR, OIL, CHEMICAL AND ATOMIC WORKERS INTERNATIONAL UNION, EDMONTON

Ups and downs

It is certainly a sad comment on our values when Maclean ’s can devote approximately 37 column inches (The Falling

sional hockey team (which, to my mind, should have been carried in the next section under Business) and less than one-quarter of that to Ken Read’s magnificent success in World Cup downhill racing. Who was the last Canadian male to achieve the same success? BEVERLY A. MILLAR, GWYNNE, ALTA.

Ladies’ aid

Congratualtions to Doris Anderson on

her article The 51-Per-Cent Minority (Jan. 28). She has articulated the real problem in terms even most men can understand. J.M. SOULIERE, REGINA

Congratulations on the excellent selec-

tion for your Podium section. Doris Anderson has written a bright and disturbing opinion piece which has no doubt shocked the sensibilities not only of men but of women. As director of the Women’s Conference Institute, I would like to add that nothing will be “offered” to women, just as it is not “offered” to any other interest group. Women themselves must recognize that their participation in the economy and in government is critical to any further considerations. EDITA KOWALSKI, DIRECTOR, WOMEN’S

CONFERENCE INSTITUTE, TORONTO I agree with Doris Anderson that

women would have clout at the polling booth. I agree completely that women are a disadvantaged majority in Canadian society. Thus I found it surprising and dismaying to discover that the Letters are edited and may be condensed.

Writers should supply their full name and address, and mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, 1&1 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M5ÍV1A7. Subscribers’ Moving Notice

Send correspondence to: Maclean's, Box 1600, Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W 2B8

Name.

New Address.

City.

My moving date is

My old address label

is attached. My new address is

on this coupon I I I wish to subscribe

to Maclean's. Send me 52 issues for only $19.50 (in Canada only). Elsewhere $30.00 except U.S., $26.00 I I Bill me

; | I enclose$_

ATTACH OLD ADDRESS LABEL HERE

AND MAIL IMMEDIATELY! I also subscribe to ( ) Chatelaine and/or ( ) FLARE and

enclose old address labels from those magazines as well. TERRY HANCEY

president of such a high-profile group as the Advisory Council on the Status of Women is unaware of the NDP’s actions and positions regarding women that we have made such a priority in our campaigns and in the House of Commons.

JUDY WASYLYCIA-LEIS, FEDERAL WOMEN’S ORGANIZER, NDP, OTTAWA

Thank you for printing Doris Anderson’s article. Hopefully it will sensitize many readers to women’s realities. I would like to point out, however, that she is mistaken in her assumption that general economic issues are of no relevance to women voters—or the even worse implication that women are not capable of grasping the importance of general economic issues in their lives. Ms. Anderson must also be taken to task for her inclusion of the NDP in her generalization about the major parties ignoring women voters. I feel the cause of feminism is only hampered by failure to give credit where it is due.

JO EVANS, PRESIDENT, ALBERTA STATUS OF WOMEN ACTION COMMITTEE, EDMONTON

This is a democratic country with neither military nor political repression, so whose fault is it that 51 per cent of the population has no influence—the politicians? Women have the vote. They have the necessary tool with which to

insist on a better life, but they don’t use it. Politicians are right. Women, on the whole, tend to vote the same as their husbands. So why bother with a group of people who have such a childlike approach to such an adult situation? Power belongs to her who takes it, and as soon as politicians sense a body of people wielding power they will gladly promise them anything they want. That’s the name of the game.

Essential services

Morris Shumiatcher’s article If They Hit, Can They Score? (Feb. 4) was superb, the message being the essence of all that motivates the “true” Canadian when he or she as a privileged voter casts the ballot to elect a responsible candidate.

KATHLEEN M. WORTHINGTON-LAKE, VICTORIA, B.C.

Arms and the man

After reading the account of Private (first class) Bobby Garwood in your article Survival of the Unjittest (Jan. 7), I would have been moved to tears if it were not for anger. War, its misery, greed and blind destruction disgusts and infuriates me, and at least I, upon reading about yet another victim of its

atrocities, can take pen in hand and vent my frustration. Private Garwood, who allegedly went “over the hill,” was not so fortunate. May the almighty courts have mercy on him.

MARILYN HEUCHAN, OTTAWA

Internal evidence

My colleagues Harold Clarke, Jane Jenson, Jon Pammett and I were pleased that in his article on Canada’s political leaders Roy MacGregor made use of some of the findings regarding political behavior and elections reported in our book Political Choice in Canada. However, his statement that issues “mean next to zilch” in elections is not supported by our work or by any responsible studies that have been done by professional political scientists on this topic in recent years. Part of our reason for writing our book was to challenge some of these simplistic assumptions about Canadian politics that are too often accepted uncritically by journalists as well as by the public. However, we have clearly not succeeded in Mr. MacGregor’s case. In our opinion his selective use of our evidence to support his own poorly founded preconceptions is thoroughly irresponsible.

LAWRENCE LEDUC, PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, WINDSOR, ONT.