PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON January 19 1981
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON January 19 1981

PEOPLE

Toronto’s Steve Podborski picked up where he left off last month by winning the first World Cup downhill race of the year last Saturday at Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany, vaulting the 23-year-old racer into first place in the over-all standings. But the good news was mixed with bad. Calgary’s Ken Read, favored to win the race after posting the fastest training times, fell when a binding locked near the bottom of the 3,320-metre Kandahar course. Read suffered ligament damage in his left knee and is not expected to race again this season.

I think Carl Sagan is going to be real surprised—intellect is in,” says Suzy Mallery, president of Man Watchers Inc., who rates the bestselling author and scientist as one of “the 12 most watchable men in the world.” With a Pulitzer Prize and several degrees under his belt, Sagan’s rise to celebrity status began with regular appearances as “cosmic explainer” to Johnny Carson. His bold and distinctly un-stuffy approach to science has since made him the darling of the lecture circuit, while ruffling a few feathers in the elitist scientific community with his characteristic epithets such as describing science as “paranoid thinking applied to nature.” Sagan, 45, is now writing his first novel, but he will continue to be a most watchable man—his hit TV series Cosmos, which goes into reruns this year, has already been seen by an estimated three per cent of the planet’s population.

When newly elected Belleville, Ont., mayor George Zegouras

received a complaint last month about pornographic magazines being displayed where children could reach them, he called the police. “I thought the lady was talking about the kind of magazines that cost $15 and are wrapped in cellophane,” says Zegouras.

But to his surprise police followed up the complaint by raiding several city stores, including the grocery store Zegouras operates with his brother, Peter, seizing copies of Elite, Swank, Hustler, Stag and Sensual Women. “These magazines are sold everywhere,” says the confused mayor. “But I can’t complain—as mayor, I’m on the police commission.”

0 Canada never looked so good to hockey fans who are now seeing the occasional Hockey Night in Canada telecast from Edmonton’s Northlands

Coliseum. Brightening up the Oilers’ centre ice, with an obvious edge over the scratchy tapes and dulcet tones of brawny Roger Doucet, is beauty Sharon Braun. Braun, 28, a classically trained singer from St. Albert, Alta., has found herself singing locally in clubs with the Edmonton Opera Company and opening for the Edmonton Drillers soccer club, but she teaches to keep a roof over her head. “Music and hockey have always been my main inspirations,” she says. “When I was a kid, Saturday night meant watching the hockey game, then Juliette and off to bed.”

Too bad Kenneth Thomson couldn’t pull a few strings for his editors at The Globe and Mail who recently paid $3,000 to criticize Pierre Trudeau in a sharply worded editorial reprinted in The Times of London. The message, about patriation of the constitution, warned Trudeau not to “ask for British help in clobbering the provinces.” Said Brian Slaight, executive vice-president of Thomson Newspapers Ltd.: “They must have thought their message was quite important.” Slaight wasn’t aware that the November editorial was displayed in Thomson’s London paper. Said Globe publisher A. Roy Megarry: “I doubt that it’s going to be sufficient to fight the federal government’s $6-million advertising program.”

After years of “love” this and “love” that, Toronto Star columnist of gooey romance and author of Lovers and Others, Once More With Love and All Men Are Not Alike Joan Sutton has finally done it. “I have fallen in love with a married man, and until he gets his divorce I am living with him,” announced Sutton at year’s end. The married man in question is New Yorker Oscar Straus, the 66-year-old son of Gladys Guggenheim, who achieves some promi-

nence in Who's Who as a business executive and member of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron, among other things. Yet the romance that has Sutton all aglow may prove her social nemesis. Mona Campbell, 61, the first woman elected to the board of the Toronto Dominion Bank, is believed to have introduced Sutton to Straus and now appears to be dismayed by the pairing, since the wife in question, Marion Miller Straus, is a close Campbell friend. Wrote Sutton: “When she found out that the man had left his wife, she was outraged. She threatened us with social ostracism— ‘All doors will be closed to you’—which is pretty funny when you consider how big Toronto is today.” The breeze from the slamming doors will be hardpressed to find Sutton, however. She plans to spend two weeks out of every month with her sweetie in New York.

I’ve been training so long that my body feels like it’s falling apart,” explained premier Canadian high jumper Debbie Brill last week at a news conference in which she announced a temporary lowering of her heights due to pregnancy. Brill, 27, is currently the third highest female leaper in the world, having eased her way over 1.97 metres last July. This July, however, she plans to have her baby, and hopes to be back in competition at indoor games early in 1982. “It’s not unusual in this sport for people to take time out for a baby,” said Brill, who also feels the rest will be good for her troubled knees. Though the announcement was made to assure the public that she would not be ground-bound forever, Brill also ended up making a personal statement about her attitude toward matrimony. “I don’t plan to ever get married,” said Brill, who has lived with musician-composer Greg Ray for eight years. “I believe a relationship is much, much more than a piece of paper.”

t’s a lot of fun—in one episode I’m mermaid and get to splash around in the ocean,” says Montreal dancer Margie Gillis of her role in the new children’s TV series Je Sovjffle. The French-language show is the brainchild of Radio Canada producer Guy Comeau, who borrowed a bit of theory from psychoanalyst Carl Jung in creating a series about children and symbols. However, Gillis, 27, keeps her splashing strictly to dry ground, giving a one-minute dance interpretation in each of the 15-minute episodes. “The symbols are very basic— the kind found in folklore,” says Gillis. Recalling the 1945 movie Anchors Away, she added, “But this is a long way from Gene Kelly dancing with Jerry the mouse.”

I wish you would go away,” Elizabeth II snapped at photographers standing outside the gates of her country estate at Sandringham. The British press, hoping for a wedding announcement between Prince Charles and any eligible from Lady Diana Spencer to his cousin Baroness Alexandra Maria von Holzhausen, swarmed Sandringham during the Royal vacation searching for a squib of insight. Prince Charles, himself, clashed grandly by wishing the editors of Fleet Street “a particularly nasty” New Year. But this was topped by the pellet-peppering of the car of reporter Shan Lancaster, who was warned away from a Royal shooting party by Prince Philip moments before the shot, which landed a pheasant nearby. The Spectator’s wag Auberon Waugh captured the public’s sympathetic mood: “This royal prerogative of shooting the press may turn out to be the most popular thing any member of the Royal Family has done since the Restoration.”

Though Pope John Paul Il’s worldwide jaunts have earned him the moniker “the jet-set Pope,” he paused last week to praise something more earthbound—the automobile. “A car, to work well, should be looked after with constant and loving care just like our soul, immortal and redeemed by Christ along the road to salvation,” said the Pope to the 40 drivers employed at the Holy See. Speaking in the Vatican garage, the Pope told the assembly, “Your profession as chauffeurs should remind you continually that we are all on the road, heading at high speed toward eternity.”

MARSHA BOULTON