PEOPLE

SHONA MCKAY May 28 1984

PEOPLE

SHONA MCKAY May 28 1984

PEOPLE

With its notorious blocks of streetwalkers—young, old, male, female and some in between—downtown Vancouver is an ideal location for Trick Eyes, the movie that director William Graham is shooting about the pitfalls of prostitution. But his choice of Cybill Shepherd as the leading call girl seemed oddly inappropriate. Blond, aloof and untouchable, the 34-year-old former model made her acting debut in The Last Picture Show. That, and her subsequent roles in Daisy Miller and The Heartbreak Kid, earned her the reputation as the Grace Kelly of the 1970s. Now, with a neckline that plumbs new depths, Shepherd has laid her WASP princess image to rest. Before she travelled north to make the film, in which she stars opposite Canadian-born actor William Shatner, Shepherd spent a day cruising the streets of Los Angeles with members of the police department’s vice squad. Noted Shepherd: “Researching this part was sometimes a frightening experience. Prostitution is a totally depressing business.”

When the Montreal Expos fired pitcher Bill (Spaceman) Lee in 1982 for conduct unbecoming to a major-league player because he had spent the first eight innings of a game drinking in a nearby tavern, many fans lamented the fate of one of baseball’s most colorful figures. After pitching

last winter for the Laguaria Tiberones in Venezuela, Lee, 37, joined the New Brunswick senior baseball league’s Moncton Mets last week. Although he is keeping himself occupied as pitcher, first baseman, little league coach and character-in-residence, he has found time to chronicle his career in an autobiography. The title? Said Lee: “If John Glenn’s successful space career means he has ‘the right stuff,’ then I must have ‘the wrong stuff.’ So that is what I called the book.” Lee says he would like to return to the majors but has had no offers. And he readily admits that with The Wrong Stuff released last week, with its candid and unrepentant confessions, “there will be no chance at all.” When the top-selling Canadian rock band The I Parachute Club played at I Sheridan College of Applied « Arts and Technology in Oakville, Ont., last week, it was far than just another

opening, another show for singer-guitarist Lorraine Segato. Says Segato, who dropped out of film stories at the college in 1976: “I remember saying on the first day of classes, ‘If I can’t make it in film, I’m going to do it in music.’ ” She has done so in spades. Since agent Gerry Young discovered Segato and fellow band members Lauri Conger and Billy Bryans in an after-hours club in Toronto in 1982, the group’s rise has been phenomenal. Its album, The Parachute Club, appeared in 1983 and has since sold 62,000 copies in Canada. The huge

success of the upbeat single Rise Up helped the band to sweep four top prizes at the fifth annual Black Music Awards in Toronto last month. The Club uses its danceable Caribbean-influenced tunes to deliver political messages, a practice particularly evident in its latest video, Boys Club, where generals jiggle globes and cardinals throw dice. Said Segato: "It is gorilla warfare. These people are the power brokers of the world today. This is what they look like— and act like.”

SHONA MCKAY