PEOPLE

PEOPLE

October 6 1986
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

October 6 1986

PEOPLE

Last year Madonna Louise Ciccone

sang about feeling “like a virgin.” Now, the actress-singer who described losing her own virginity as “a career move” is under fire from Planned Parenthood groups. They say that her latest hit, “Papa Don’t Preach,” promotes teenage pregnancy. Decipherable lyrics include: ‘'I’ve been losing sleep/But I made up my mind/I'm keeping my baby. ” Madonna, 27, says the song is “a celebration of life.” Supporting her is Tipper Gore, a founder of the Washington-based Parents Music Resource Center, who cites “sensitivity in both the lyrics and Madonna’s rendition.” Undaunted, Planned Parenthood is asking Warner Bros. Records to donate at least 25 per cent of the song’s earnings to programs dealing with responsible sexual behavior.

Encouraged by a profitable first season as artistic director of Ontario’s Stratford Festival, John Neville says that he is “frantically busy” planning next year’s productions, in which he promises to act “in something.” This week in Toron-

to he is onstage as his friend Sir Noël Coward in the musical An Evening of Noël Coward. Recalled Neville: “Noël was a consummate theatregoer and used to visit actors backstage, usually with words of encouragement.” Neville himself is receiving encouragement from lofty theatrical quarters. Last month Sir Laurence Olivier sent him a letter of congratulations on the Stratford season. “Awfully nice of Larry,” said Neville, “but then I am the godfather of one of his children.”

The hottest ticket in Ottawa these days is for the $150-a-plate roast of Transport Minister John Crosbie to raise funds for wheelchair athlete Rick Hansen. Organizers of the Oct. 26 dinner will be hard pressed to hold the roasters, who

include Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, Liberal Leader John Turner, NDP Leader Ed Broadbent and

former Newfoundland premier Frank Moores, to

their four-minute time limits. Said Moores of his fellow Newfoundlander: “Crosbie is the perfect antithesis to Hansen. Rick Hansen is a consummate athlete and Crosbie has trouble getting out of his limousine.”

When the Toronto Arts Awards Foundation presented its inaugural prizes last week, only one of the recipients was born in the city—multidimensional artist Michael Snow.

However, author Margaret Atwood, architect Barton Myers, actor Eric Peterson, citizen-activist Jane Jacobs, literary doyen Robertson Davies, former film festival director Wayne Clarkson and musician Phil Nimmons have all contributed significantly to the cultural life of the city. Junowinning clarinetist Nimmons, 63, said that although he heard about the award last June he has not decided what to do with the $5,000 prize. Said Nimmons:

“I’ll leave it to spontaneity, or my family.”

In the world of high fashion, the pinnacle is the designs of Yves St. Laurent. Last week 100 YSL originals insured for approximately $3 million were modelled at fund-raising events in Montreal and Toronto. It was the first time the collection had been shown in Canada and only the third time it has left France. Krystyn Griffen, who spent 18 months organizing the $500,000 spectacle, shared a table with Pierre Trudeau at the black-tie dinner in support of Montreal’s Museum of Fine Arts. “When the models started,” said Griffin, “and they came from everywhere—Somalia, Togo, New YorkPierre said it reminded him of the United Nations, but much more pleasant.” The former prime minister did not have a date for the evening, but a Kenyan model wearing a St. Laurent Boyd with fiancé,

bridal gown tossed him her bouquet.

n their first date three years ago, guitarist Liona Boyd, 35, and thenCanada Development Investment Corp. (CDIC) president Joel Bell went bike riding in Vancouver. It took Bell two months to arrange a second date, but his persistence paid off, and last week the couple announced their engagement. Bell, 45, was closely linked to the Liberals and was fired from his $157,500 CDIC post in 1984 by the Tories. Now a private businessman, Bell said: “I have had my share of publicity. But this is a happy occasion and one I’m very comfortable to be public about.”

MARSHA BOULTON