COVER

A LINEUP OF STARS

Many of the stars to watch at the 15th Olympic Winter Games in Calgary next February are the medallists at this year’s world championships in the skiing, skating and sledding sports. The tally:

March 23 1987
COVER

A LINEUP OF STARS

Many of the stars to watch at the 15th Olympic Winter Games in Calgary next February are the medallists at this year’s world championships in the skiing, skating and sledding sports. The tally:

March 23 1987

A LINEUP OF STARS

Many of the stars to watch at the 15th Olympic Winter Games in Calgary next February are the medallists at this year’s world championships in the skiing, skating and sledding sports. The tally:

Alpine Skiing

Swiss skiers command winter’s glamor sport a year before the Olympics. Led by Pirmin Zurbriggen, 24, and Maria Walliser, 23, the

Swiss won seven of the eight world championship events held from Jan. 27 to Feb. 8 in Crans/Montana, Switzerland. The host team missed medal spots only in the men’s special slalom—the shortest of the three slaloms—won by West Germany’s Frank Wörndl. But with victories measured by hundredths of a second, home ground may help the Canadian Olympic challenge led by Laurie Graham, 26, and Rob Boyd, 21, who each finished fifth in the championship downhill races.

Men’s Downhill

1. Peter Müller SUI

2. Pirmin Zurbriggen SUI

3. Karl Alpiger SUI

Men’s Special Slalom

1. Frank Wörndl FRG

2. Guenther Mader AUT

3. Armin Bittner FRG

Men’s Giant Slalom

1. Pirmin Zurbriggen SUI

2. Marc Girardelli LUX

3. Alberto Tomba ITA

Men’s Super Giant Slalom

1. Pirmin Zurbriggen SUI

2. Marc Girardelli LUX

3. Markus Wasmeier FRG

Women’s Downhill

1. Maria Walliser SUI

2. Michela Figini SUI

3. R. Mösenlechner FRG

Women’s Special Slalom

1. Erika Hess SUI

2. Roswitha Steiner SUI

3. Mateja Svet YUG

Women’s Giant Slalom

1. Vreni Schneider SUI

2. Mateja Svet YUG

3. Maria Walliser SUI

2:07.80

2:08.13

2:08.20

1:54.63

1:54.82

1:55.03

2:32.38

2:32.45

2:33.13

1:19.93

1:20.80

1:21.08

1:43.80

1:44.11

1:44.86

1:33.30

1:33.55

1.34.39

2:21.22

2:21.78

2:23.51

Women’s Super Giant Slalom

1. Maria Walliser SUI 1:19.17

2. Michela Figini SUI 1:20.18

3. Mateja Svet YUG 1:20.23

Ski Jumping

test, hurtle win it for a is ski not 70 jumping enough or 90 metres conto down a manmade chute, sail farther through thin

air than any competitor, then land intact on a snow slope below. Jumpers also are judged for style—keeping skis and arms from wobbling. Graceful daredevils from Czechoslovakia, Austria and Finland dominated the 1987 world skijump championships in Oberstdorf, West Germany, Feb. 11 to 22, and are the men to beat in the 1988 Olympics.

70 m Jump

1. Jiri Parma 2. Matti Nykänen 3. Vegard Opaas 90 m Jump 1. Andreas Felder 2. Vegard Opaas 3. Ernst Vettori Team Jumping 1. Finland 2. Norway 3. Austria

TCH 224.4 pts FIN 216.5 pts NOR 215.8 pts

AUT 216.0 pts NOR 208.3 pts AUT 207.0 pts

634.1 pts 598.0 pts 587.5 pts

Biathlon

Sprinting on skis around a cross-country circuit with a .22-calibre rifle slung over the shoulder is no easy test. The challenge is compound-

skier must stop and fire accurately enough at a target to avoid penalty laps. East German ski marksmen are the world’s best, sweeping the Biathlon world championships in February at Lake Placid, N.Y.

ed when

Men’s 10 km

1. F.P. Rötsch GDR

2. Matthias Jacob GDR

3. Andre Sehmisch GDR

Men’s 20 km

1. F.P. Rötsch GDR

2. Josh Thompson USA

3. Jan Matous TCH

Men’s 4 x 7.5 km Relay

1. East Germany

2. Soviet Union

3. West Germany

29:49.6

30:38.8

30:55.4

1.00:00

1.00:51

1.01:15

1.25:02

1.27:12

1.27:21

Cross-Country Skiing

Sweden’s cross-country ski team is poised as the power to beat at the Calgary Olympics. Not only did the team win the majority of

medals at February’s World Nordic Ski Championships in Oberstdorf, West Germany, but its successes were distributed between men and women and between two newly instituted racing categories, the classic and the free technique—a fast new step that resembles skating.

Men’s 15 km (Classic)

1. Marco Albarello ITA

2. Thomas Wassberg SWE

3. Mikhail Deviatiarov URS

Men’s 30 km (Classic)

1. Thomas Wassberg SWE

2. Aki Karvonen FIN

3. Christer Majback SWE

Men’s 50 km (Free)

1. Maurilio De Zolt ITA

2. Thomas Wassberg SWE

3. Torgny Mogren SWE

Men’s 4 x 10 km Relay (Free)

1. Sweden

2. Soviet Union

3. Norway

Women’s 5 km (Classic)

1. Marjo Matikainen FIN

2. Anfissa Reztsova URS

3. Evi Kratzer SUI

43:01.8

43:08.6

43:09.6

1.24:30

1.26:24

1:26.55

2.11:27

2.11:49

2.09.14

1.38:04

1.38:30

1.38:48

14:45.7

14.49.3

14:52.5

Women’s 10 km (Classic)

1. Anne Jahren NOR 31:49.5

2. Marjo Matikainen FIN 31:50.3

3. Brit Pettersen NOR 32:09.2

Women’s 20 km (Free)

1. Marie Helene Westin SWE 57:20.5

2. Anfisa Retzova URS 57:47.6

3. Larissa Ptitsyna URS 58:28.7

Women’s 4 x 5 km Relay (Free)

1. Soviet Union 58:08.8

2. Norway 58:46.1

3. Sweden 59:41.0

Nordic Combined

Northern Europe’s perennial dominance of combined skiing contests, in which skiers compete in both ski jumping and cross-country racing on successive days, is rarely challenged. But at the

world Nordic championships in February, veteran U.S. skier Kerry Lynch, 29, surprised the powerful Norwegian skiers by winning the individual silver medal. Lynch is likely to be the sole North American challenger at Calgary next year.

Individual Event

1. Torbjorn Lokken

2. Kerry Lynch

3. Trond Bredesen Men’s Team Event

1. West Germany

2. Norway

3. Soviet Union

NOR 423.80 pts USA 422.75 pts NOR 422.48 pts

1,261 pts

1,244 pts 1,236 pts

Ice Hockey

Canada’s Olympic hockey team, though lacking any assurance of reinforcement by the NHL’s best, will hold a major advan-

tage against Europe’s top players— home ice and home fans. As well, Calgary-based Team Canada performed respectably in the most representative recent round-robin competition, Moscow’s Izvestia Tournament in December. Canada finished ahead of Sweden, Czechoslovakia and Finland.

At the 1986 Izvestia Tournament

1. Soviet Union

2. Canada

3. Sweden

Figure Skating

Canada’s Brian Orser, who won the world title in men’s figure skating last week, is the host country’s only champion entry

in the 1988 winter Olympics. Soviet skaters dominated the pairs and ice

dancing competitions at the figure skating championships in Cincinnati. Canada’s Elizabeth Manley, in the singles, and ice dancers Tracy Wilson and Robert McCall are also in the running for medals in Calgary—although the stiff competition from Europe and the United States is bound to make figure skating one of the most exciting events at the Games.

Men’s Singles

1. Brian Orser CDN

2. Brian Boitano USA

3. Alexander Fadeev URS

Ladies Singles

1. Katarina Witt GDR

2. Debi Thomas USA

3. Caryn Kadavy USA

Pairs

1. Gordeeva/Grinkov URS

2. Valova/Vasiliev URS

3. Watson/Oppegard USA

Ice Dancing

1. Bestemianova/Sukin URS

2. Klimova/Ponomarenko URS

3. T. Wilson/R. McCall CDN

Speed Skating

In the sport of skating against the clock around an oval of ice, the length of the race often divides sprinters from all-

rounders who combine speed and stamina. Indeed, in the world speed skating championships in February, the sprinters competed at Ste-Foy, Que., and the all-rounders elsewhere—the women at West Allis, Wis., the men in Heerenveen, Netherlands. Despite the divided activity, the East German women’s team collected 11 of the 15 medals over distances from 500 to 5,000 m. Karin Kania, Andrea Ehrig and Christa Rothenburger seem certain to be stars of Calgary’s oval.

Men’s 500 m

1. Sergei Fokichev

2. Akira Kuroiwa

3. Yukihiro Mitani Men’s 1,000 m

1. Yukihiro Mitani

2. Akira Kuroiwa

3. Igor Zhelezovski Men’s 1,500 m

1. Nikolai Gulyaev

2. Viktor Shasherin

3. Oleg Bozyev Men’s 5,000 m

1. Leo Visser

2. Nikolai Gulyaev

3. Geir Karlstad Men’s 10,000 m

1. Geir Karlstad

2. Leo Visser

3. Michael Hadschieff

URS

JPN

JPN

JPN

JPN

URS

URS

URS

URS

37.82

37.90

37.93

1:16.71

1:16.89

1:17.10

1:52.70

1:53.10

1:53.52

NED 6:47.01 URS 6:51.28 NOR 6:52.86

NOR 14:03.92 NED 14:11.63 AUT 14:12.66

Women’s 500 m

1. Bonnie Blair USA 40.50

2. Christa Rothenburger GDR 41.18

3. Karin Kania GDR 41.26

Women’s 1,000 m

1. Karin Kania GDR 1:22.25

2. Christa Rothenburger GDR 1:23.45

3. Andrea Ehrig GDR 1:24.27

Women’s 1,500 m

1. Karin Kania GDR 2:08.90

2. Andrea Ehrig GDR 2:10.61

3. Yvonne van Gennip NED 2:11.81

Women’s 3,000 m

1. Andrea Ehrig GDR 4:30.10

2. Karin Kania GDR 4:32.16

3. Yvonne van Gennip NED 4:37.33

Women’s 5,000 m

1. Andrea Ehrig GDR 7:46.96

2. Karin Kania GDR 7:50.15

3. Yvonne van Gennip NED 7:53.27

Bobsleigh

East German crews are claimed to have the slickest bobsleigh designs in the world, but the Swiss proved to be the sharpest

sledders at the January world championships. Except for a pair of Soviet bronze medallists, few others were able to seriously test the major two powers in the high-tech, high-speed contest on Switzerland’s St. Moritz run.

Men’s 2-Man

1. Pichler/Poltera

2. Hiltebrand/Kiser Hoppe/Schauerhammer

3. Kipurs/Alexandrov Men’s 4-Man

1. Hiltebrand (driver)

2. Hoppe (driver)

3. Pichler (driver)

SUI

SUI

GDR

URS

SUI

GDR

SUI

■TIE

Luge

The trio of East German women who overwhelmed opponents at the luge world championships in January at Innsbruck, Austria, are

expected to dominate their races at the Calgary Olympics. The fiercest competition is expected among the men who compete in the event, in which racers roar down an icy chute lying face up on a sled.

Men’s Singles

1. Markus Prock AUT 2:32.99

2. Jens Müller GDR 2:33.12

3. Sergei Danilin URS 2:33.27

Men’s Doubles

1. Hoffmann/Pietsch GDR 1:22.91

2. Islanker/Hackl FRG 1:23.41

3. Schwab/Staudinger FRG 1:23.69

Women’s Singles

1. Cerstin Schmidt GDR 2:05.87

2. Gabriele Kohlisch GDR 2.06.23

3. Ute Oberhoffner GDR 2:06.24