PEOPLE

PEOPLE

YVONNE COX July 4 1988
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

YVONNE COX July 4 1988

PEOPLE

Living up to the words of his hit song, rock superstar Bruce Springsteen is romantically “on fire” these days. As his 12-city, five-week European tour generates praise from critics and fans alike, The Boss is drawing even more attention over the breakup of his three-year marriage to actress Julianne Phillips, 28, and his fling with his band’s backup singer, Patti Scialfa, 31. Scialfa, who has been with the band since 1984, is, like the 38year-old Springsteen, a native of Asbury Park, N.J. While in Rome last month, the pair were frequently spotted holding hands and sharing candlelit dinners. At 3:30 one morning, they stunned passers-by by singing The River and I’m on Fire. Said Paolo Zefferi, an entertainment writer with the Milan newspaper Corriere della sera who witnessed the impromptu concert: “You only had to see them to know that they were in love.”

Writer Ben Bradlee Jr. says that he was drawn Springsteen, to the Oliver North story because he found the charismatic former U.S. marine a compelling American figure. In Guts and Glory, a just-published 559-page unauthorized biography of North—who faces criminal charges in connection with his role in funding Nicaraguan rebels from clandestine arms sales to Iran—Bradlee examines the “01liemania” of last summer’s televised Iran-contra hearings. Said the 39-yearold political reporter with The Boston Globe: “People loved the way the guy looked—he was sort of Saturday Evening Post nostalgia, Norman Rockwell, country fairs and lemonade stands. He was a rebel with a cause, and people admire passion, even misguided passion.”

The child-actress of an acclaimed 1985 Canadian movie has graduated to a more adult role. Now 17, Vancouver native Margaret Langrick — who won a Genie Award for playing a 12year-old in My American Cousin—even plays a partially nude scene in Cold Comfort, a psychological drama to be released next year. In the movie, a reclusive mechanic rescues a travelling salesman

from a prairie blizzard and presents him to his precocious daughter, played by Langrick, as a 16th-birthday present. As for removing some of her clothing for the camera, Langrick said: “It made me very nervous at first. I’m going to feel funny when I see that scene, but it was tastefully done.”

w hen they got married in ▼ f 1973, 1 they were clearly an odd couple: Jane Fonda, the glamorous Hollywood movie star, and Tom Hayden, a scruffy, long-haired leader of 1960s protest movements. “I was a famous radical who was morally and political-

ly skeptical about fame; Bardot: she was an actress whose career itself depended on public acclaim. We must have appeared like a remake of Beauty and the Beast,” writes Hayden in Reunion, his justpublished memoirs. Of his marriage to the 50year-old Fonda, Hayden, 48, now a Democratic representative in the California state as-

sembly, writes: “For one who never counted on a stable future, I have been a lucky man these past 15 years.”

pera singer Paul Frey has come a long way from being a high-school dropout who sang along with Elvis Presley on the radio as a truck driver. The 47year-old tenor from Heidelberg, Ont., who began his opera career at 29, was a hit last summer singing the demanding title role in Lohengrin at the celebrated annual Richard Wagner festival in Bayreuth, West Germany. And last week, Frey scored another Lohengrin triumph—this time making his London Royal Opera House debut in Covent Garden in a performance originally slated for superstar Placido Domingo and then another singer who became ill. Frey drew an enthusiastic review from critic Edward Greenfield of The Guardian, who wrote, “Here is nothing of the usual German bark, but a consistently pure ringing tone that focuses cleanly in the middle.”

ince she retired from acting 15 years ago, French sex symbol Brigitte Bardot, 53, has restricted her public appearances to promoting animal welfare. “You can only have genuine communication with animals,” says Bardot, who has been married three times and now lives on her own with 14 dogs and 20 cats near fashionable St. Tropez on the French Riviera. Her latest cause: the plight of an estimated 200,000 pets

abandoned annually on roadsides or in forests by French summer vacationers. During a rare appearance on French TV to discuss the problem, a barefoot Bardot, wearing a peasant skirt and apron, even treated viewers to a tour of her farm near her secluded villa where she keeps even more animals. Said Bardot: “I prefer to hear a dog bark than to listen to stupidity repeated by a human being.”

YVONNE COX