LETTERS

Car trouble

August 22 1988
LETTERS

Car trouble

August 22 1988

Car trouble

LETTERS

I found that your cover package “Car wars” (Aug. 1) glossed over some important points in its hurry to glamorize the North American car industry. It mentions that “by 1991, the industry will be producing five million more cars and trucks than there are buyers for them.” Car manufacturers are raping the land in their quest for raw materials, car graveyards are filled to the brim with yesterday’s hot item and the price of gasoline continues to climb while its long-term availability is questionable. Yet, the industry, in its chase after the almighty dollar, is going to create a five-million-car glut? Think about it.

-GORDON WILLIAMSON, Calgary

An inequitable situation

Your article on Bill C-72, which amended the Official Languages Act (“Mulroney takes charge,” Canada, July 18), provided no explanation about why nine members of Parliament voted against the bill. Francophones are exclusively being hired and promoted in the public service, while English-speaking Canadians are denied career opportunities and are therefore being discriminated against. No action, however, has been taken to correct this inequitable situation.

-DAN McKENZIE, Member of Parliament, Ottawa

Charting political waters

The House of Commons loves to bash the Senate any time the upper chamber speaks up, and MPs accuse the Senate of

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sleeping when it is silent (“John Turner’s Senate gamble,” Canada/Special Report, Aug. 1). On both free trade and Meech Lake, it is the Senate, not the Commons, which attempts to let the people speak. There is something to be said for an upper house that does not have to chart its paths for political gain.

-DONALD L. HEALY, Melbourne, Que.

Great idea, John. Let’s have an election on free trade. And after that, how about an election on abortion and then maybe one on immigration or national defence, all important issues “the people should decide.” And don’t forget Meech Lake. Speaking of which, do you suppose it’s too late to have an election on Trudeau’s Constitution? I waited in vain for the Liberals to take that one to the people.

-KENNETH WILSON, Nelson, B.C.

Rekindling resentment

The diminishing fires of western Canadian resentment toward Ontario will surely be refuelled by Allan Fotheringham’s virulent column “From poverty to decadence” (Column, July 18). His sneering remark that Alberta “has gone from poverty to decadence without passing through civilization” not only reveals his lack of research into the history of the province but is followed by an incredible number of viciously opinionated allusions that drop to the level of racial slurs, including the reference to Edmontonians as “Edmonchuks.” What has soured an otherwise interesting writer? -MADELINE TAUCHMAN,

Ajax, Ont.

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply name, address and telephone number. Mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, Maclean Hunter Bldg., 777 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. M5W 1A7.