LETTERS

Settling in Canada

August 8 1988
LETTERS

Settling in Canada

August 8 1988

Settling in Canada

LETTERS

Your piece “The Nation-Makers" (Canada/Special Report, July 11) establishes the advantage of the immigrant-selection process of the 1940s and 1950s when the immigrants you featured arrived. It was successful until the introduction of the present legislation in 1978. Under the present act, we have increased the opportunities for entry of family members without merit being a consideration and have reduced opportunities for those with skills and talents. And although the statute requires that there be the ability to settle in Canada, after allowing for the emigration brain drain, 60 per cent of the net gain at the border are people who are functionally illiterate.—CHARLES CAMPBELL,

West Vancouver

No beer for Flying Phil

I read with interest your reference to my record as highways minister in British Columbia (“The lasting legacy of Amor DeCosmos,” Canada/Special Report, July 18). I wish to make it perfectly clear that while I did indeed have several air-conditioned cars at my disposal in various parts of the province—planes, after all, only get you from airport to airport—I never carried beer in any of them or used the air conditioning to cool beer for highway workers. Of course, those cars were government vehicles, and I cannot account for what other users or drivers may have done with them.

-PHILIP (FLYING PHIL) GAGLARDI,

Kamloops, B.C.

Defining stress

If Jennifer Dobson (“The race for a space,” Behavior, July 11) can afford to go off to Europe for six weeks this summer before going on to the University of British Columbia, she does not have a hard time financially—unlike many deserving students, who, on top of having financial difficulties, also have to obtain the required magic averages. Those are the students with real stress.

-FRANK MERCER, Wolfville, N.S.

Defending canine honor

For half a year now, our Amnesty International group has been sending letters to U.S. Ambassador Thomas Niles voicing our opposition to the death penalty in the United States— particularly the execution of Willie Darden in Florida. I know of no response. Perhaps the key to receiving a reply lies in insulting Niles’s dog. Maclean’s did so and received a prompt letter of rebuke (“Letters,” July 18), complete with color photo. It’s certainly nice to know where the ambassador’s priorities lie. —DAVID MILLER,

Toronto

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply name, address and telephone number. Mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, Maclean Hunter Bldg., 777 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. M5W 1A7.