PEOPLE

PEOPLE

October 2 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

October 2 1989

PEOPLE

EVERYONE LOVES A CIRCUS

Montreal producer Hélène Dufresne says that winning an Emmy Award last week for her TV special on the Cirque du Soleil, the acclaimed Montreal-based acrobatic troupe, will be the "break" she needs to sell the TV show worldwide. Later, Hollywood celebrities showed their support for the circus by flocking to the big top for the troupe's third run in California. Harold Ramis, who stars in the 1989 movie Ghostbusters //, was among the many entertainers applauding the show. Said Ramis: "I'd like to join the troupe—even as the guy who cleans the tent."

Love at work

For celebrity photographer Douglas Kirkland, falling in love is one of the joys of his job. Kirkland, who since 1961 has photographed such screen seductresses as Marilyn Monroe, Kathleen Turner and Elizabeth Taylor, says that usually he is unable to resist his female subjects. “Very often, at the end of a session, I find myself throwing my arms around my subjects and kissing them,” added the 55-yearold Fort Erie, Ont., native. Kirkland, whose recently released book of portraits, Light Years, includes 128 revealing pictures of many of the world’s most sought-after celebrities, said that he likes to ereate a “high sense of emotion” be-

tween himself and his subjects.

The Los Angeles-based photographer added that one of his most electrically charged sessions was with Hollywood actress Kelly McGillis. Said Kirkland: “She is a very hot woman—the sexuality coming from her was so strong that she was steaming.”

VERY FUMY U.S. PERCEPTIONS

While working in the United States, Canadian David Foley says, he discovered that Americans have a new stereotype of their northern neighbors—they think "we are naturally funny." Foley is part of the five-man, Torontobased comedy troupe The Kids in the Hall, which is winning rave reviews in America and now is broadcast on CBC-TV and on U.S. pay TV. Said Foley: "It used to be Americans believed we were boring, but now, when they want a good party, they just set up a punch bowl and invite over some Canadians."

BACKYARD PRIDE

Toronto socialite Hilary Weston says that "frustration" and "anger" led her and a friend, Nicole Eaton, to prowl through hundreds of gardens across Canada to produce their newly released book, In a Canadian Garden. Weston, 47, added that she and Eaton, 44, wanted to prove that Canadian gardens rank with the more celebrated backyards of England—where she has a 59-acre estate called Fort Belvedere. Said Weston, twice named to the international Best-Dressed List: "There's a lot of sophistication in Canada, but Canadians are so self-effacing."

Thanks for the memories

They first performed together in the 1920s, when George Burns, now 93, was already a vaudeville star and Bob Hope, now 86, was still an unknown comedian. This week, for the first time since those early days, the two friends are in the same live show, headlining a variety night in New York City’s Madison Square Gardens. But Hope said that the two comedians, who have often appeared together on TV, were not inspired to do the show just for the memories. Instead, said the multimillionaire, “Somebody mentioned ‘money.’ ”